Underground History

Underground History is a regular segment of The Jefferson Exchange where we dust off the history right under our noses, and our feet, with Mark Tveskov and Chelsea Rose of the Southern Oregon University Anthropology Lab.

 

Underground History is one of The Jefferson Exchange's most popular segments.

But why just listen on the radio? We're bringing Underground History above ground with Underground History Live!

Join Jefferson Exchange host Geoffrey Riley and Chelsea Rose from SOU's Anthropology Lab at The Bella Union in Jacksonville for our next Underground History Live. It happens Monday, August 6 from 6:00 - 8:00 pm.

© 2003 Samvado Gunnar Kossatz

The Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and his followers are gone from Oregon, but absolutely not forgotten.  The religious leader set up camp on a ranch in Wasco County in the early 80s, and captured attention and headlines and law enforcement scrutiny. 

What began as a "free love" movement turned darker, including attempts to kill key officials and members of the public. 

This month's edition of Underground History, our regular soiree with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology, covers the after-the-fact investigation of Rajneeshpuram. 

Matthew Cowan of the Oregon Historical Society played a part in the creation of the recent Netflix documentary about the Rajneeshees. 

Dennis Griffin is the state archaelogist who did some work on the ranch. 

BLM/Public Domain

Few people had heard of fairy shrimp when they showed up in Jackson County 20 years ago.  Before that, the little critters were thought to be no closer than Mount Shasta. 

But they live in vernal pools, seasonal pools of water, in the Agate Desert around White City.  And they are listed as threatened, requiring some effort to protect them. 

This month's edition of Underground History, with our partners at the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology, considers the shrimp... archaeologists have done some work exploring the areas where they live. 

Underground History: Balloon Bombs Remembered

Apr 25, 2018
Michael (a.k.a. moik) McCullough, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=58371763

The fears of a Japanese attack on the mainland United States actually came true during the second World War.  But no one knew it at the time. 

The discovery of a balloon bomb near Bly, Oregon in the spring of 1945 resulted in the deaths of six people. 

That case and others were kept under wraps by government censors at the time. 

Our Underground History segment with the archaeologists of the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology (SOULA) focuses on the balloon bombings this month. 

The Waldo-Bogle family were early African-American residents of Oregon.
Oregon Historical Society

Underground History is one of The Jefferson Exchange's most popular segments.

But why just listen on the radio? We're bringing Underground History above ground with Underground History Live!

Join Jefferson Exchange host Geoffrey Riley and Chelsea Rose from SOU's Anthropology Lab at The Black Sheep Pub and Restaurant on the plaza in Ashland for our next Underground History Live. It happens Monday, April 30 from 6:00 - 8:00 pm.

bbcrc.org

Anybody who knows a thing or two about railroads in our region knows the significant of Black Butte. 

It's the junction south of Weed where the Siskiyou Line of the former Southern Pacific, the old main line, meets its successor, the Cascade route: the current main line. 

Seems like a good place for some kind of celebration of railroad history.  And it is, through the efforts of the Black Butte Center for Railroad Culture

It is not strictly a railroad museum, because it incorporates railroad literature and music and other aspects of railroad culture.  And it is the focus of this month's edition of Underground History, our regular confab with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology, SOULA. 

Oregon State Archives

Oregon remains one of the whitest states in the union, a legacy of the state's exclusion of all people of color upon entering the Union. 

But African-Americans have made significant contributions to the state throughout its history.  And those contributions are recognized in the first-ever Black History Month observance at the Oregon State Archives. 

"Black in Oregon, 1840-1870" is now on display, and it is the subject of this month's edition of Underground History. 

Underground History: The Modoc War In Photos

Jan 24, 2018
Eadward Muybridge/California Historical Society

The Modoc War of the 1870s gets lots of attention from historians, archaeologists, and just folks.  It was a major episode in the defeat of Native Americans at the hands of the federal government, resulting in their movement to reservations. 

And it is the focus of this month's edition of Underground History, our regular visit with Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology (SOULA)

Chelsea Rose and Mark Tveskov bring in Eric Gleason, who's been doing research on the Modoc War. 

WCCasey/Wikimedia

The prevailing theory until lately was that humans arrived in North America on foot... across the Bering Land Bridge, before polar ice melted and covered it with the Bering Strait. 

But that's a VERY long walk, and boats might have worked just as well.  And probably did, as new evidence shows. 

Our monthly underground history segment pairs us up with the researchers at the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology (SOULA)

And this month we hear about Matthew Des Lauriers' work at Cedros Island in Baja California, finding artifacts from 13,000 years ago. 

Underground History: Yreka's Old Chinatown

Nov 29, 2017
Southern Oregon University

There's a good chance that if you set a shovel to the ground in a place where people have lived for a long time, you'll find SOME kind of artifact.  This is what keeps archaeologists busy and provides content for our monthly Underground History segment. 

This month: the excavation of Yreka's old Chinatown, dug up when Interstate Five was built.  There's a good collection of artifacts, but the documentation and interpretation were never completed. 

Sarah Heffner is working to update the information about the collection. 

She is our guest, along with regulars Chelsea Rose and Mark Tveskov of the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology

Oregon Encyclopedia

When Charles Applegate moved into his house in Yoncalla, he probably was not thinking much about the year 2017.  Because Applegate moved in in 1852, and that makes his house the oldest one in Oregon continuously owned by the same family. 

As you could probably tell by the many places named Applegate, the family has been an influential one in the state's history. 

That's why a team from the Museum of Natural and Cultural History at the University of Oregon spent some time there recently, digging for artifacts. 

That's the topic of this month's edition of Underground History, co-hosted by our friends at the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology

University of Washington Field Methods in Indigenous Archaeology

When we talk about "unearthing history," it's quite literal for archaeologists. 

And while the professionals supervise the work, there's room for amateurs to dig in the ground for clues to the lives of the people who preceded us. 

In this month's installment of "Underground History," our partners at the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology introduce us to the Oregon Archaeological Society

OAS provides volunteers for digs around the state, and provides those volunteers with training. 

SOULA Facebook page

Untrained eyes will only see a wooded hillside.  But the people of the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology--SOULA--travel with trained eyes. 

And they used those eyes, plus metal detectors and other tools, to further investigate the site of the Battle of Big Bend, the last skirmish in the "Rogue Indian War" of the 19th century. 

This month's installment of Underground History brings details of the dig to the forefront. 

nagagroup.org

Lumps of beeswax were offered by Native Americans in trade with white explorers along the Oregon Coast centuries ago. 

The explorers wondered where the beeswax came from, and the answer appears to be from the wreck of a Spanish cargo ship in the Manila-Aculpulco trade.  Possibly before 1700! 

The wax still turns up from time to time, but the ship's remains have eluded discovery thus far. 

This month's installment of "Underground History" brings Southern Oregon University Laborary of Anthropology experts Mark Tveskov and Chelsea Rose back to the studio. 

University of Oregon

We have mixed feelings in our country about refugees who arrive on our shores seeking a safe place far from wars. 

But we forget that human beings in our own region felt the same impulse in the middle of the 19th century.  That's when the series of battles and skirmishes collectively known as the Rogue Indian War disrupted life in the region. 

One site of particular interest to archaeologists is the Harris Cabin, near Merlin in Josephine County.  The Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology has studied the site for years now. 

It is the focus of this month's edition of "Underground History." 

You think of archaeology, you think of shovels... digging in the ground is what recovers artifacts. 

But technology helps in covering broader areas, like the ancient burial mounds of the Prairie Island Indian Community in Minnesota.  Most of the mounds have been disturbed, but LIDAR technology has allowed the mapping of the remaining mounds. 

And further investigation shows a propensity for lightning strikes at the mounds.  That's the focus of this month's "Underground History" with Mark Tveskov of the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology

The idea of an American West that is timeless and unchanging stands in sharp contrast to the social reality.

Over the past two centuries, drastic changes have taken place in the societies that occupy the west, and changes--especially economic ones--continue to this day. 

This is the subject matter for the book Historical Archaeology Through a Western Lens, by Margie Purser of Sonoma State University and Mark Warner of the University of Idaho. 

They are the guests in this month's edition of "Underground History," co-hosted by Mark Tveskov and Chelsea Rose of the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology

publicceo.com

The State of Jefferson gets some recognition from the Oregon Historical Society in its latest publication. 

The Oregon Historical Quarterly's latest issue focuses on historical events and research in our corners of Oregon and California. 

The issue itself bears the one-time-only title of "Jefferson Historical Quarterly."  So we talk about some of the work to explore the region in this month's edition of "Underground History." 

In-house archaeologist Chelsea Rose from the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology returns. 

jacksonvilleoregon.com

It is only appropriate that Southern Oregon's largest observance of Chinese New Year takes place in Jacksonville. 

The historic city was home to a significant Chinese population, back in the days when Jacksonville was a mining center and the county seat. 

Our in-house archaeologists from the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology have explored that period in history through digs in Jacksonville. 

And Mark Tveskov and Chelsea Rose return with another installment of "Underground History," with guest David Lei.  He is a featured speaker in Chinese New Year ceremonies this weekend (February 18). 

BLM

Thank goodness for the dry environment in the vicinity of Paisley, Oregon. 

The conditions have helped preserve evidence of possible human habitation thousands of years ago... long before the usual theories about the first humans in North America. 

Dennis Jenkins at the University of Oregon has supervised many digs at the Paisley Caves, and now he reports on the finding of very old horse bones found there.  Dr. Jenkins shares the microphone in this month's edition of "Underground History." 

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