With Brexit Triggered, Uncertainty Continues Over What's To Come

Today the United Kingdom formally told the European Union it is leaving, after decades of membership in the 28-nation political alliance and trading bloc. The move triggers an estimated two-year divorce process that will involve many months of tough negotiations and will launch Britain on a new, uncertain path. Addressing the House of Commons in London, Prime Minister Theresa May said Brexit is an opportunity for her country to chart a new course, unencumbered by the bureaucracy of the...

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In U.S. Restaurants, Bars And Food Trucks, 'Modern Slavery' Persists

They come from places like Vietnam, China, Mexico and Guatemala, lured by promises of better-paying jobs and legal immigration. Instead, they're smuggled into the U.S., forced to work around the clock as bussers, wait staff and cooks, and housed in cramped living quarters. For this, they must pay exorbitant fees that become an insurmountable debt, even as their pay is often withheld, stolen or unfairly docked. In restaurants, bars and food trucks across America, many workers are entrapped in...

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Understanding Immigration: One Person's Story

The interest in immigration is acute at the moment, but it's always there. Daniel Connolly spent more than a decade reporting on immigration, specifically Mexican immigration, legal and not. He dug a bit deeper with a focus on one young man considering his options in a country where his parents reside illegally. The Book of Isaias tells the story of the young man.

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Where Levees Fail In California, Nature Can Step In To Nurture Rivers

After millions of dollars of flood damage and mass evacuations this year, California is grappling with how to update its aging flood infrastructure. Some say a natural approach might be part of the answer. All the water that poured down spillways at the Oroville Dam in northern California did a lot of damage to the area — and for miles down the river. "It looks like a bomb's gone off," says John Carlon of River Partners , a nonprofit that does river restoration. "That's what it looks like."...

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EPA Decides Not To Ban A Pesticide, Despite Its Own Evidence Of Risk

Update 7:06 P.M. Eastern: The EPA says it's reversing course and keeping this pesticide on the market. That's despite the agency's earlier conclusion, reached during the Obama administration, that chlorpyrifos could pose risks to consumers. It's a signal that toxic chemicals will face less restrictive regulation by the Trump Administration. In its decision , the EPA didn't exactly repudiate its earlier scientific findings. But it did say that there's still a lot of scientific uncertainty...

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On March 16th, the Trump administration released its FY2018 budget outline which includes a provision to eliminate annual grants to public radio and television stations through the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB).  Ultimately, Congress will make the final decision on continuing the annual federal investment that supports JPR and other public radio and television stations across the country. This support totals $1.35 per citizen per year for all public radio and television stations, and just 30 cents per citizen annually for radio stations alone.

Mayor Steinberg addresses a crowd during the unity rally before a forum hosted by Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones with Acting Director of U.S. Immigrations and Custom Enforcement, Thomas Homan, on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 in Sacramento.
Vanessa S. Nelson / Capital Public Radio

The Trump administration's immigration enforcement chief could have gone anywhere in the nation to take public questions for the first time.

He chose Sacramento — the California capital, where legislative Democrats want to bar state and local authorities from working with federal agents and effectively create a "sanctuary state."

It started peacefully, with dozens of protesters gathered outside the Sacramento County gymnasium before U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement Chief Thomas Homan spoke.

The 82,500-acre Elliott State Forest in southwestern Oregon may be staying in public hands after all.

Treasurer Tobias Read — who cast a crucial vote last month to proceed with the sale — announced Tuesday that he sees a "path forward" for keeping the forest in public hands.

Read said in an interview that it is too early to proclaim certainty that the forest would remain public, but he added, "I would not be making this statement if I did not think that I had a reasonable degree of confidence that this is achievable."

Wikimedia

Are we nostalgic for the Civil War?  People in several states have talked about secession in recent years, from Texans frustrated with Barack Obama to Californians frustrated with Donald Trump. 

Actually, some of the agitation for an independent California pre-dates the Trump administration. 

Yes California is the organization most vocal about splitting the state from the union. 

Marcus Ruiz-Evans is a co-founder, Clare Hedin is the Bay Area representative. 

Public Domain

Even people who can afford homes are aware of how tight the rental market is. 

From Eugene to Redding, vacancy rates hover around one or two percent.  Which makes rental housing hard to find AND expensive.  The situation contributes to homelessness as well. 

In the city of Redding, the Community Revitalization and Development Corporation works to bring up the numbers of affordable housing units. 

Officials in New York, California and elsewhere say they'll fight Attorney General Jeff Sessions' move to cut off billions in federal grant money to cities that don't share the Trump administration's strict approach to enforcing immigration laws.

"The Trump Administration is pushing an unrealistic and mean spirited executive order," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted Monday night. "If they want a fight, we'll see them in court."

Spanish version (versión en español): ACLU Oregon: Joven DACA Es Detenido Por Agentes De ICE En El Sureste De Portland

The ACLU of Oregon says Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents detained a man at his Southeast Portland home Sunday morning.

Francisco Rodriguez Dominguez, 25, has been part of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program – or DACA – since 2013.

Former Oregon Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins is taking over the chairmanship of the state's Democratic Party.

Atkins was chosen by the party's state central committee Sunday in an election held in Salem. She replaces retired Portland lawyer Frank Dixon, who did not seek re-election.

On a vote of 84-67, Atkins defeated longtime party official Larry Taylor of Astoria. He backed Bernie Sanders' presidential candidacy last year and had strong support from many other Sanders followers critical of the party establishment.

A bill restricting the use of a certain class of insecticide will have a formal hearing Monday afternoon in the Oregon legislature.  KLCC’s Brian Bull has more.  

The chief of Eugene’s police department is retiring.  After more than three decades of service, Pete Kerns says he’ll officially step down in the next month or two.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports. 

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