medicine

commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=662527

Cass Ingram is a believer in marijuana as a healing agent. 

But there's room in his heart and in his osteopathic practice for other herbs, as well. 

Dr. Ingram wrote a book called "The Cannabis Cure," but recognizes its legal limitations.  So he also suggests the use of various herbs as remedies for various afflictions, things from hops to cinnamon. 

Understanding Ayurvedic Healing

Feb 28, 2017
http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/obf_images/42/ea/021e3cc426d33baac73528f44039.jpgGallery: http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/V0045682.html, CC BY 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=36661881

The world wasn't created yesterday.  And over the years, human beings have learned a few things about how the body works and thrives. 

Some of the things learned are very old, including the ancient Indian healing wisdom of Ayurveda. 

Acharya Shunya is a practitioner, and offers up advice in her book Ayurveda Lifestyle Wisdom: A Complete Prescription to Optimize Your Health, Prevent Disease, and Live with Vitality and Joy

SSgt Alesia Goosic/U.S. Navy/Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22686562

The doctor arrives in the exam room after you've waited a while. 

And it's great that she's finally here, but is she really present? 

Doctors are thoroughly trained, but they also have to work like the rest of us to make sure they're present in the moment. 

Ronald Epstein, a doctor himself, writes about mindfulness in medicine in his book Attending. It includes examples of doctors who have (and have not) stepped up when the moment demanded.

Ashland Company Boosts "Cancer Moonshot"

Aug 17, 2016
NASA/Public Domain

President Kennedy talked about putting humans on the moon by the end of the 1960s.  The job got done, but it took a lot of people, money, and work. 

Now President Obama wants the same kind of effort in finding a cure for cancer.  The head of an Ashland-based company is excited.  Michael Stadnisky is the CEO of FlowJo, which works with human cells. 

One aim: helping the body's immune system fight cancer. 

OHSU Researcher Sees Diet Effect On MS

Jun 22, 2016
Wikimedia

Multiple sclerosis, MS, has no cure... and over time, MS patients generally see a decline in neurological and other functions as the disease advances. 

There are treatments, to be sure, but recent research suggests that diet can play a big part in maintaining health through MS. 

Vijayshree Yadav, an assistant professor of neurology at Oregon Health & Science University, studies diet and lifestyle effects on MS, and finds that diets with whole foods and lower saturated fats can slow the advance of MS. 

Why Doctors Can't Guarantee Success

Mar 28, 2016
Basic Books

We're often cautioned not to think of doctors as something like gods.  But they do hold the power of life and death over us in extreme cases. 

And one member of the fraternity points out just how much can go wrong, in the book Snowball in a Blizzard

Dr. Steven Hatch says admitting the murkiness in both diagnosis and prognosis can go a long way to improving health decisions by doctor and patient. 

Getting Your Doctor To Listen

Feb 2, 2016
Oxford University Press

It's not the stethoscope, it's the ears.  Doctors have a lot to listen to when a patient arrives complaining about a health matter. 

But the patient's story tops the list. 

Medical schools stress the importance of taking a patient history and keeping the story straight, a process underscored in the book Listening For What Matters

Kelly Piet Photography

Getting politicians to agree on HOW to reform health care can be a chore, since they don't even agree on a RIGHT to health care. 

Naturopathic doctors Sarah Sue Myers and McClane Duncan of Siskiyou Vital Medicine agree there is such a right, and they agree on plenty more. 

They claim their Medford practice is the first naturopathic direct primary care (DPC) clinic in Oregon. 

We get the goods on their services and plans, including $100 a month for unlimited doctor visits in a single year. 

Getting Familiar With Medicinal Herbs

Oct 23, 2015
Storey Publishing

"Medicine" in most of the country means pills or capsules or vials, all carefully packaged, sterile, and bearing little resemblance to items found in nature. 

But there are healing properties in many forests and gardens, and Rosemary Gladstar introduces us to them in her book Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner's Guide.

Ciders, potions, teas, and tinctures and more are laid out in the book. 

Avery Books

Even people who have never had surgery have an idea (from TV shows) how it's done: clean gowns, face masks, sterile tools.  NONE of those things were part of surgery in the early 19th century. 

One American doctor led the way: Thomas Dent Mütter. 

His surgical breakthroughs--including little details like anesthesia--are catalogued in the book Dr. Mütter’s Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine, now in paperback. 

U of O Prof Gets Patent For Fractal Use

Aug 11, 2015
University of Oregon

Fractals, those mathematical patterns, are fun to look at. 

And they may also help people with the ABILITY to look. 

University of Oregon physicist Richard Taylor was just awarded a patent for a fractal-based implant designed to help blind people see. 

U.S. Navy/Public Domain

It turns out living in paradise has its drawbacks.

Residents of Christmas Island in the Pacific are prone to a "surfer's disease," caused by exposure to abundant dust, wind, and sunlight. 

Two doctors from Medford's Medical Eye Center noticed the situation on a fishing trip years ago. 

Now they return on a regular basis to treat eye patients with techniques otherwise unknown to the area. 

Wikimedia

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus--HIV--is no longer the death sentence it once was. 

But modern drugs still can't shrink distances, so treatment can be difficult for HIV patients in rural areas. 

The HIV Alliance, based in Eugene, is ramping up a "telehealth" program to provide services to HIV patients in rural Southern and Eastern Oregon. 

Riding Beyond Cancer

Jul 16, 2014

Horseback riding is not for everybody, but it's good for a lot of people. 

Horses, like therapy dogs, can be helpful companions for people with a variety of health challenges. 

The organization Riding Beyond pairs up horses with women dealing with breast cancer treatments... with some encouraging results. 

The Doctor Will See You Now...

Jul 11, 2014
Public Domain

The next time you wait just a little too long for the doctor, consider the fate of our Victorian ancestors. 

Maybe the waits were shorter, but what was the quality of their care? 

That question, and others, are answered by a "Victorian Medical Practices" tour offered at the Beekman House in Jacksonville. 

Tuberculosis In History: "The Remedy"

May 23, 2014
Penguin Books

More than a century ago, a diagnosis of tuberculosis meant almost certain death for the patient. 

Medical science desperately searched for a cure. 

Then physician Robert Koch announced success: he could stop TB.

Another physician, Arthur Conan Doyle, took great interest. 

Reforming Health Care, Continued

May 7, 2014
NIH/Public Domain

The national debate about reforming the health care system tends to veer automatically into politics. 

But there are important realms left behind when that happens: medicine and economics.

"Fourteen Stories" From The Hospital

Apr 24, 2014
U.S. Navy/Public Domain

You can bet that anyone who works in an emergency room comes away from the experience with a few stories to tell. 

But in the interest of patient confidentiality, many of those stories go untold. 

Dr. Jay Baruch works in the ER and teaches medicine at Brown University. 

Theresa Chan/Project Hope

The modern world is taken for granted in our region.

But it has barely penetrated into remote areas in other parts of the world. 

Excuse Me, Doctor...

Jan 29, 2014
Xlibris

Even before anybody uttered the phrase "Obamacare," we were peppered with advice about how to navigate the health care system. 

The advice included directions on how to take more control of our health care--not just our insurance.  That bit of advice is still being given, even by the MDs themselves. 

Pages