media

News from around the world in an instant.  New movies for fall.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

News from around the world in an instant.  Summer movies.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

News from around the world in an instant.  Summer movies.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

Gage Skidmore, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=56560359

"Facts are facts."  "You can argue about the meaning, but not about the facts."  Insert your favorite phrase on facts and reality here. 

Telling the truth seems to be taking a beating in today's world. 

Brooke Gladstone gets to watch the process in her role as co-host of "On The Media," heard on JPR. 

She gives us some off-air thoughts in her small book The Trouble With Reality: A Rumination on Moral Panic in Our Time

Arturo Pardavila III, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49782715

One giant TV chain wants to buy another giant TV chain. 

Stephen Colbert's presidential insults draw the attention of the FCC chair. 

Social media "influencers" played a role in the recent Fyre Festival fiasco. 

Yep, always SOMETHING to talk about in the media, and we gather up some highlights for our monthly chat "Signals & Noise" with Southern Oregon University Communications faculty Precious Yamaguchi and Andrew Gay. 

All you need is a phone that reaches the Internet.  And with that in your hand, your media options are limitless.  In this media age, it can be hard to separate the signals from the noise. 

Which is why we take time each month for a media perusal, called "Signals & Noise," with members of the communications faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

This month we visit with Andrew Gay and Christopher Lucas about Pulitzer Prize winners, crowdfunding for documentary films, and other issues on the media horizon. 

Bidgee, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7437952

There's never a dull moment in media lately.  President Trump has gone from talking about "fake news" to declaring members of the news media "enemies of the people." 

And on the lighter side, who handed Warren Beatty that wrong envelope at the Oscars? 

We track the changes in the world of information in a segment called Signals & Noise.  Our partners: the Communications department at Southern Oregon University. 

Information Today: Signals & Noise

Feb 8, 2017
Stefan Kühn, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=105738

It's a weird time in the history of information.  On one hand, the Internet makes so much information available so quickly, it's easy to stay informed. 

On the other hand, people fight about facts and truth far more than they used to, and the president himself even referred to a news organization as "fake news" shortly before he took office. 

We track the changes in the world of information in a new segment called Signals & Noise, starting today. 

Our partners: the Communications department at Southern Oregon University. 

Media Literacy In An Age Of Media Profusion

Nov 30, 2016
Wikimedia

The election season of 2016 served up surprises by the truckload. 

One of them was the realization that mass media is not so mass anymore... each of us has our own choices in media, and the choices often give plenty of opinion with facts. 

Which brings up another point: how do you KNOW when you're getting facts?  Bogus news stories on pop-up media gained traction in an already fragmented media world. 

These are issues that come up in the teaching of Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi at Southern Oregon University, where Ebbi "Mohammad" Zamani is a student. 

The Bumpy Early History Of Broadcasting

Jun 10, 2016
HarperCollins

It's one of the sadder stories in broadcasting history: the first FM radios were rendered completely useless when the federal government MOVED the entire FM band to a different range of frequencies. 

First and most obvious question: why?  The surprising answer and the personalities involved are revealed in Scott Woolley's book The Network

Money, power, egos... all figured in the development of the industry we know and love. 

A Library Of Basic Stuff (But Deep)

Jan 22, 2016
Bloomsbury Publishing

"Object lessons" when we were kids were generally life's lessons learned the hard way.

But the Object Lessons book series is truly about objects: the stuff of everyday life; banal, mundane, and in this treatment, fascinating. 

Seriously, when was the last time you stopped to think about things like hoods on sweatshirts, or glass, and how we came to use them? 

VENTSday: Holiday Shopping + Tax Inversions

Dec 1, 2015

Holiday shopping season is here; do you get in line early or hide someplace?  Let's get your take on the seasonal crush in this week's VENTSday.

The alternate topic: your thoughts on American companies merging with or buying foreign companies, so they can declare their headquarters offshore and get a tax break.

You've got opinions on events in the news, and our VENTSday segment is designed to let the world hear them.

We plop a pair of topics on the table--frequently unrelated--and let YOU deliver your passionate (and polite) views on them.

mailtribune.com

Maybe the police chases and house fires get the headlines and the big pictures, but it's another corner of the Medford Mail Tribune that garners a lot of the eyeballs. 

The paper has been running a question-and-answer column for many years now called "Since You Asked."

And it's become a highly popular feature, with many questions submitted. 

Best of all for the writers, it's delivered in a fairly wry and snarky voice. 

Oregon Public Broadcasting, based in Portland, commissioned a survey on Oregonian attitudes toward the media. OPB presented the findings in Medford on Wednesday, October 2nd on its talk show "Think Out Loud." JPR's Geoffrey Riley joined the panel discussion, and JPR aired the program live on the News and Information Service, Wednesday at Noon. Follow the link to listen to the recording.

New Owners For Mail Tribune, Daily Tidings

Sep 12, 2013
Ed Schipul

The days of sharing an owner with Fox News just came to an end for the Mail Tribune of Medford and the Daily Tidings of Ashland.

The branch of News Corporation that owned those and other newspapers was just sold to Fortress Investment Group, which will manage the papers through a subsidiary called GateHouse Media.