fish

visityurokcountry.com

The Yurok Tribe will host its annual Klamath Salmon Festival on schedule on Saturday.  But for the first time in the half-century history of the festival, no salmon will be served. 

Tribal leaders say there just are not enough fish to feed all the festival visitors. 

Not with any sense of environmental responsibility, anyway. 

Edward J. O'Neill/National Fish and Wildlife Service

Upper Klamath Lake is full of food for fish. 

So it's a bit of a mystery why big fish like redband trout leave the lake and head into its tributaries, where there's less food. 

Oregon Fish and Wildlife has a new tool in potentially solving the mystery: radio tags in the fish.  The tags will help ODFW track fish movements in and around the lake. 

Ken Morrish/Wild Salmon Center

The fishing is world-class along the North Umpqua River. 

And it might be even better, if Congress acts to create the Frank Moore Wild Steelhead Sanctuary.  Moore was the longtime operator of the Steamboat Inn along the river, and a member of the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission. 

A bill to create the sanctuary in his name is working its way ever so slowly through Congress. 

C.J. Samson/Wikimedia

  It sounds almost too good to be true: we can fish the oceans AND feed the earth's growing population, sustainably. 

That is the finding of several scientists, including Christopher Costello at the University of California, Santa Barbara. 

The scientists' report says "business as usual" would have to change, but that the Earth's fisheries could rebound in a decade. 

The suggested approach is "rights-based," rebuilding protected local fisheries. 

USDA Forest Service

It's a regular rhythm of the seasons: fish return to rivers at certain times of the year.

And laws change on January 1st of nearly every year. 

2016 is no different, and laws and regulations affecting fishing take effect in Oregon when the calendar changes. 

The Native Fish Society provided a good deal of input to the new rules, favoring some and opposing others. 

Fishpeople

Overfishing has greatly impacted food supplies we draw from the ocean.  But we still need and like seafood.

Portland-based Fishpeople keeps an eye on both situations. 

The company is in the business of selling seafood, but also limits what it sells to what the ocean can continue to produce, sustainably. 

John R. McMillan/NOAA Fisheries

Fish can take a beating in drought years in Western rivers. 

But water management can make the effects of drought worse for fish, in the eyes of the Yurok Tribe. 

The tribe runs its own fisheries department, and recently released an analysis of water flows in the Scott River, a major Klamath River tributary. 

The tribe's concerns about the Klamath are well-known; the Yurok pulled out of the Klamath Agreements seeking dam removal a few months ago. 

  JeffX 7/7 @ 8:30: The efforts to improve living conditions for fish tend to focus on big dams, like the four proposed for removal on the Klamath River.  But changes to existing small dams can help as well.  

  The federal Bureau of Reclamation will upgrade the fish ladder at a small irrigation dam in Ashland this summer.  The project is part of a broader effort to make life better for fish throughout the Rogue River Basin.  BOR's Doug DeFlitch joins us. 

Expanding The Zone of "Watchable Wildlife"

Dec 19, 2014
Wikimedia

How did a guy who worked as a wildlife biologist manage to leave millions of dollars for enhancing "watchable wildlife?"

By being a savvy buyer and seller of real estate.

The late Bob Mace worked for Oregon Fish and Wildlife for years, retiring in the early 80s.

And he left money and property behind when he died, so more people over time would be able to enjoy watchable wildlife.

Suing To Help The Bull Trout

Jul 22, 2014
U.S. Fish & Wildlife/Public Domain

Environmental groups are keeping their own and government lawyers busy. 

Cascadia Wildlands and other groups recently announced an intention to sue the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management over the bull trout. 

The groups say the land agencies need a "timeout" to consider how projects on the lands they manage would affect the threatened trout. 

From Renewables To Fish Restoration

Jun 12, 2014
Public Domain

Using renewable energy in Oregon provides a double benefit. 

First, there's the obvious benefit of using wind or solar or geothermal power instead of burning fossil fuels. 

Second, money from Pacific Power's Blue Sky program goes to help restore fish habitat in key streams around the region. 

The streams include tributaries of the Rogue and Illinois rivers, among others. 

Why The Oregon Chub Is A De-Listing Candidate

Feb 11, 2014
Oregon Fish & Wildlife

Not every species that enters the endangered species list stays there for decades. 

The bald eagle recovered enough to get de-listed, and so did several other animals.  But no fish ever came off the list… until now. 

Dungeness Crab Prices Set

Dec 13, 2013
Jon Sullivan

Dungeness crab fishers will begin setting their pots today after reaching a price agreement with seafood processors.

With the Oregon Department of Agriculture supervising negotiations, the sides agreed to a minimum price of $2.65 per pound, a 35-cent increase from a year ago, and the highest price ever agreed upon for an opening.

Lawsuit Over McKenzie River Hatchery

Dec 9, 2013
Oregon Fish & Wildlife

When disputes over timber and water arise, fish are often at the center of concern.

They are sensitive to changes in streams and the forests that give birth to the streams.  Now a pair of environmental groups are taking the the federal government to court over fish. 

California Crab Fishers Want Higher Prices

Dec 4, 2013

Crab fishers on California's north coast are keeping their boats tied to the dock in an effort to get a higher price from wholesalers.

The Santa Rosa Democrat reports boat captains want more than the $2.50 a pound being offered, saying $3 a pound is being paid to crabbers working fisheries farther south.

Skippers who fish off Mendocino, Humboldt, and Del Norte counties say crabs are expected to be smaller than average this year, so they want a higher price.