documentary film

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Stephen Most is both a published author and a documentary filmmaker. 

So it figures that at some point he'd write a book about documentaries. 

That book is Stories Make the World: Reflections on Storytelling and the Art of the Documentary.

It's more than setting up a camera, he explains... it's an artistic process to portray life. 

"Orphan Films" Come Home To Oregon

Nov 12, 2015
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Maybe you're old enough to remember those starchy educational films that played on 16mm projectors in elementary school; subjects included trustworthiness and hygiene, among many others. 

And the film usually fluttered and often broke in the projector. 

The state of Oregon used to have quite a pile of those old films, and not just for youngsters. 

Titles like "Fumigating Strawberry Fields" and "Dungeness Crab Meat Extraction" may not have packed movie houses, but they served their purposes. 

For reasons we'll explore, more than 12,000 such films from Oregon are now housed at Indiana University.  A few of these so-called "orphan films" will be screened in Oregon starting this weekend. 

LNG Opposition Takes To the Screen

Jul 9, 2015
36 Inches The Movie

Environmental issues frequently make news in our region.  But few issues can stir up passions with just three letters: LNG.

The proposal for a liquefied natural gas export terminal at North Bend and a 230-plus mile pipeline too is like nails on a blackboard to many people.

Including the ones who made a mini-documentary film about the pipeline: "36 Inches."

A film produced in the 1940's, titled “Redwood Saga,” tells the story of how loggers chopped down California coastal redwood trees in the 1940's.  The producer, Guy Haselton, filmed the 10-minute, black-and-white movie in 1946.  It demonstrates how the redwoods, “now the object of awe and protection, were then regarded simply as commercial assets.”  Home builders around the world sought the redwood lumber because of its beauty and resistance to termites and disease.