disabilities

Public Domain/Wikimedia

Any public building erected in recent years includes ramps and other devices to get people in wheelchairs inside with minimal effort. 

So we've adjusted our physical spaces, but how about our literature?  The depictions of people with disabilities are changing there as well, and University of Oregon Associate Professor Betsy Wheeler is observing and assisting the changes. 

Wheeler's work includes studies of disabilities in literature, but also postwar (WWII) literature and culture, including comic books. 

She is our guest in this month's edition of cUriOus: Research Meets Radio. 

MANCC

Andromeda and Venus sound like great characters to build a dance around.  Now add wheelchairs. 

That is exactly what the art/architecture/social justice group Kinetic Light is doing with its work "DESCENT." 

The piece will have its West Coast debut at the Britt Festivals on Friday (September 29), after Kinetic Light spends five days in residence at Crater Renaissance Academy in Central Point. 

Saddle Up For Access

Jun 17, 2016
Access Adventure

The National Park system celebrates its first century this year, with ceremonies across the system.

It's a chance to observe the spectacular places we've protected; places that all too often were inaccessible to people with disabilities. 

The great John Muir was an advocate for conservation, but wheelchairs were not foremost on his mind.  His grandson, Michael Muir, is the founder and executive director of Access Adventure, bringing people with disabilities and horses together for outdoor recreation. 

Learning About Life With A Disability

Feb 3, 2016
U.S. Army/Public Domain

In our time, kids have gotten used to the idea of sharing classrooms with kids with disabilities; children in wheelchairs are not segregated from the student population like they once were. 

But there's still room for all students to understand what life is like with a disability of some kind. 

That's why the Medford School District is running an "Ability Awareness Campaign" through the end of February. 

Fourth graders will get to experience short periods without sight or without speech, or with some other disability. 

Getting People To Talk About Disabilities

Jan 18, 2016
Wikimedia

We used to be rather unkind to people with disabilities in our society.  It wasn't so long ago the term "cripple" was still socially acceptable.

Times change, and so have attitudes about disabilities and the people who bear them. 

Oregon Humanities' "Conversation Project" brings the issue to communities around the state, led by Jill Crawford Hurt, who inherited a family neuropathy.