The Jefferson Exchange

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JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook.

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Hachette Book Group

In a world where pens are still mightier than swords, (or guns), Kimberley Strassel is no stranger to battle.

The Oregon-born political commentator writes Potomac Watch, a regular column in the the Wall Street Journal.

Her latest material appears in book-form: Intimidation Game: How The Left Is Silencing Free Speech.

The author makes the case for politicized, colluding bureaucracy, zooming in on the IRS's treatment of conservative non-profits.

NASA

Whether self-interest is enlightened or not, it's not good for the planet.

That's the general thrust of Bob Doppelt's work.  We met Bob a few years ago to talk about his book From Me To We

He continues his work on climate change and sustainability through The Resource Innovation Group (TRIG) in the Willamette Valley, teaching at both Willamette University and the University of Oregon. 

How to make the me-to-we shift and how to implement changes get an airing at a meeting of Southern Oregon Climate Action Now (SOCAN). 

Access Adventure

The National Park system celebrates its first century this year, with ceremonies across the system.

It's a chance to observe the spectacular places we've protected; places that all too often were inaccessible to people with disabilities. 

The great John Muir was an advocate for conservation, but wheelchairs were not foremost on his mind.  His grandson, Michael Muir, is the founder and executive director of Access Adventure, bringing people with disabilities and horses together for outdoor recreation. 

Leehspride/wikimedia

Even when school is out for the summer, debates about education continue. 

And teachers and their work are always right in the middle of those debates. 

Oregon's largest teacher's union, the Oregon Education Association, sends members to Washington, DC early next month for big meetings of the National Education Association, the parent group.  OEA President Hanna Vaandering is preparing to travel to the gathering. 

Harvard University Press

Whether Hillary Clinton wins the White House or not, she is NOT the first woman to try, not by a long shot.

The first woman to seek the presidency did so before women even had the right to vote in America; does the name Victoria Woodhull ring a bell?  Woodhull and the later seekers are profiled in Ellen Fitzpatrick's book The Highest Glass Ceiling

Fitzpatrick dazzled us a few years back with Letters to Jackie

Anmol Waychal/wikimedia

It's a moment that sticks with us on The Exchange... we asked Ken Goddard from the National Forensics Laboratory in Ashland if elephants were going to make it.  His answer: "it's not looking good, is it?" 

By one count, the world loses 96 elephants a day, mostly to poachers who only want the ivory tusks. 

Researcher Caitlin O'Connell is determined to help elephants survive; she is featured in a new National Geographic WILD special on elephants and their plight. 

Christiaan Briggs/Wikimedia

The children's advocacy center concept has helped authorities investigate child sex abuse cases; advocacy centers are quiet, comfortable places for interviewing and treating victims.

But who oversees them?  Accreditation comes from the National Children's Alliance, which oversees the centers in Jackson and Josephine Counties and nearly 800 others. 

NCA Executive Director Teresa Huizar will visit the CAC in Medford next week while in town for a child abuse symposium. 

W.W. Norton Books

Remember the town hall meetings with Congress members in 2009 where people screamed their opposition to Obamacare?  A year later, Republicans wiped out Democrats in the mid-term elections at all levels of government. 

The impact was especially profound in state legislatures, and GOP control of many of those gave the party the ability to control the process of re-drawing district lines after the 2010 census. 

In a book with a title we can't say on the air--Ratf**ked--Salon Editor-in-chief David Daley writes of the convergence of political players and dark money that made redistricting an enduring Republican victory. 

Wctmcollegegurgaon/Wikimedia

If a student comes up with an invention as part of a college class, who owns the rights to the invention, student?  University?  Both? 

It's a sticky subject that has already come up several times, because there's potentially a lot of money on the line. 

The tension led to the creation of Students For Intellectual Property, which advocates for the student rights to the things they create for college work. 

Kentaro Iemoto/Wikimedia

Eugene city leaders demonstrated on several occasions a commitment to lessening carbon emissions. 

Their reward was a trip to one of the worst-emitting cities on the planet: Beijing. 

Mayor Kitty Piercy recently returned from a low-carbon cities summit in China's capital, one of just a handful of American cities represented, all of them much bigger than Eugene. 

christopherphillips.com

We can totally relate to Christopher Phillips' approach to life: ask LOTS of questions. 

Phillips follows in the footsteps of Socrates in his work as author and speaker; the Socratic method is all about the questions. 

In his latest book, The Philosophy of Childing, Phillips urges us to be more childlike in our approach to the world.  Well, beyond just asking "why" over and over. 

NOAA

If you're looking for rainfall comparisons between this year and last year, try this one: Redding got 15 more inches rain of since October 1st than in the previous year.  FIFTEEN inches. 

But many a meteorologist points out that the El Niño rains were not evenly distributed: much of Southern California is still experiencing drought conditions. 

Even so, some drought restrictions are being lifted.  The Bay Institute takes major exception to actions by the state Water Resources Control Board and other entities. 

guernicamag.org

One word sums up the biggest news story of the moment: Orlando. 

On this week's VENTSday, we ask for your input on what the mass shooting says about America and its people. 

Our other topic deals specifically with our end of the country: does increased rainfall mean drought restrictions should be lifted? 

VENTSday removes the guests and puts listener comments front and center on The Exchange.  Once a week, it's all about you... we plop a pair of topics on the table, post a survey on our Facebook page, and open the phone lines and email box for live comments. 

The topics can range from presidential politics to how you spend your days off.  Got an observation or opinion?  Share it with the State of Jefferson on VENTSday. 

Penguin Random House

It was what the world wanted: the end of the Soviet Union, the "evil empire," the Communist stronghold.  And the USSR did, in fact, dissolve. 

So why is the world generally unhappy with what followed?  Because the Russia we got, with the autocratic Vladimir Putin in command, is a far cry from the democratic republic we hoped for. 

Russian native Arkady Ostrovsky goes back to the Cold War to explain how we got here, in his book The Invention of Russia

Wikimedia

 If you happen to meet Adam Davis, ask him what he does for a living. 

He'd probably get a chuckle out of it.  Davis is the Executive Director of Oregon Humanities--you know, "O. Hm."--and he leads the Conversation Project offering called "What Do You Do?"

It's a VERY common question upon meeting fellow Americans; small wonder, since we work longer hours than people in many other developed countries. 

Wikimedia

 A culture like ours that values youth and vitality does not talk easily about death. 

Which might make death all the more surprising and hard to deal with when it arrives. 

The concept of the "death café" gives people a chance to gather in a relaxing setting to just talk about death. 

Ashland Death Café meets several times a year to provide that opportunity. 

Perseus Books

 It's no accident that Native Americans revere the coyote as a trickster, and Warner Brothers named a cartoon character Wile E. Coyote.  It's just observation. 

This most clever of animals (okay, maybe not the cartoon one) has constantly confounded the efforts of humans to fence it in, knock it down, and wipe it out.  Not only do coyotes survive in their traditional habitats, they have migrated into new surroundings, including Central Park in New York, among many places. 

Dan Flores traces the battle between human and dog-like creature in Coyote America

Horsetown Clear Creek Preserve

The sign says BLM, but the Horsetown Clear Creek Preserve near Redding includes 27 acres of land owned by a private non-profit group. 

The group, which bears the name of the preserve--call it HCCP--just won an award from the Bureau of Land Management for two decades of solid work. 

HCCP volunteers perform preservation work, provide educational programs to help young people better understand nature and our relationship to it, and other duties that maximize the use and enjoyment of the preserve. 

Wikimedia

Not a corner of the country is untouched by the massacre in Orlando. 

The mixture of rage and sadness and bewilderment at the killing of 50 people will be expressed in many ways.

Southern Oregon Pride (SOPride) joins forces with other groups in a vigil on the Ashland Plaza Monday evening at 6:30.  A second vigil is planned for "the bricks," the courtyard at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, at 8:30.

HarperCollins

It's one of the sadder stories in broadcasting history: the first FM radios were rendered completely useless when the federal government MOVED the entire FM band to a different range of frequencies. 

First and most obvious question: why?  The surprising answer and the personalities involved are revealed in Scott Woolley's book The Network

Money, power, egos... all figured in the development of the industry we know and love. 

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