The Jefferson Exchange

News & Info: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook.  Find the News & Information station list here.

Or suggest a guest for The Exchange.

NPR

A lot of what we know about the world got locked up a long time ago. What if we're just plain wrong?

The NPR podcast "Invisibilia" explores the forces that shape our world and influence our behavior.

We give the second hour of the Exchange time slot over to "Invisibilia" for this and the next four Fridays. Enjoy the stories and the science that make the show unique. 

This week: We are naturally drawn to finding solutions. But are there ever problems we shouldn’t try to solve? Invisibilia co-host Lulu Miller visits a town in Belgium with a completely different approach to dealing with mental illness.

visityurokcountry.com

The Yurok Tribe will host its annual Klamath Salmon Festival on schedule on Saturday.  But for the first time in the half-century history of the festival, no salmon will be served. 

Tribal leaders say there just are not enough fish to feed all the festival visitors. 

Not with any sense of environmental responsibility, anyway. 

NASA/Public Domain

President Kennedy talked about putting humans on the moon by the end of the 1960s.  The job got done, but it took a lot of people, money, and work. 

Now President Obama wants the same kind of effort in finding a cure for cancer.  The head of an Ashland-based company is excited.  Michael Stadnisky is the CEO of FlowJo, which works with human cells. 

One aim: helping the body's immune system fight cancer. 

OSU Press

Marie Equi may be the most amazing woman you never heard of. 

She was born when child labor was still legal, got out of textile work, and fled New England for the West Coast. 

Equi attended medical school at a time when few women did so, fought for women's suffrage and other rights, and was perhaps the first well-known lesbian in Oregon. 

Equi is the focus of the new book Marie Equi: Radical Politics and Outlaw Passions, from Oregon State University Press. 

Wikimedia

Maybe if you live to be 100, you'll get a lot of birthday parties with new music.  The National Park Service centennial has been observed with new music in Washington and at Crater Lake. 

Now it's time for a similar celebration at Whiskeytown National Recreation Area. 

"Symphony on the Beach" on Saturday night (August 20) features the Shasta Symphony performing a new work for the occasion by Redding composer Dan Pinkston called "In This Great Expanse." 

The piece celebrates Northern California's natural beauty. 

Wikimedia

Controversy seems to follow water bottling operations wherever they indicate an interest in setting up shop. 

An entire Oregon county voted in May's election to block the Nestlé company--and any other bottler--from setting up shop in the county. 

But the city that would host such a plant, Cascade Locks, voted in favor, by a wide margin.  So the city council directed staff to keep working with Nestlé on getting a plant set up. 

Wikimedia

Half the states in the country legalized marijuana for either medical or personal use.  But within the past week, the federal government refused to budge, keeping pot as a "Schedule 1" narcotic: no medical value. 

So that's topic we serve up, fresh and hot, for this week's VENTSday: what's the value of marijuana to you or society? 

VENTSday removes the guests and puts listener comments front and center on The Exchange. Once a week, it's all about you... we plop a topic on the table, post a survey on our Facebook page, and open the phone lines and email box for live comments.

The topics can range from presidential politics to how you spend your days off. Got an observation or opinion? Share it with the State of Jefferson on VENTSday.

Wikimedia

J.D. Vance's memoir Hillbilly Elegy is well-timed for an election year focused on the rage of working-class white people. 

Because that's the family background that spawned him, before going on to the Marines, college, and Yale Law School. 

His family moved from Appalachia to the industrial Midwest... in the days before people called that "the Rust Belt."  Vance is honest and probing and frequently very funny in writing about his birth family and culture. 

Discussions of reproductive rights for women in America often quickly devolve and divide into "pro-choice" and "pro-life" sides. 

The concept of "reproductive justice" is meant to be much bigger than abortion, focusing on a whole range of issues facing women, minorities, and otherwise marginalized people. 

Loretta Ross and Toni M. Bond Leonard were present to create the term Reproductive Justice.  Ross is co-founder of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective

Leonard is Past Board President of SisterSong, also Co-founder/former President-CEO of Black Women for Reproductive Justice.

They arrive in Ashland this week for a Friday session at the Shakespeare Festival, discussing and explaining the many concepts wrapped up in the term. 

Wikimedia

All things bee are celebrated on Saturday, August 20th, at the Oregon Honey Festival in Ashland. 

Our appreciation of pollination has grown in recent years, as bee numbers have continued to decline. 

Entomologist Dr. Lynn Royce has studied bee population declines, and her nonprofit Tree Hive Bees aims to put bees where they naturally belong: in trees. 

Even people and programs that celebrate history can make a bit of history themselves. 

So it is with "As It Was," the two-minute regional history program that airs weekdays on JPR (and immediately following the second hour of the Exchange). 

The current series of "As It Was" airs its 3,000th installment next week.  And the people involved still like doing it. 

Racism Happens Here

Aug 12, 2016
Geoffrey Riley/JPR

Ugly incidents in any small town can produce an instant reaction: "that can't happen here." 

  But it did: an African-American employee of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival was the target of ugly racial talk in a brief encounter this summer. 

Christiana Clark posted a video shortly after the event; she joins us for a discussion of what she experienced then and on other occasions.  It's part of our continuing effort to explore racial attitudes, from the perspective of people who are often victims of racism. 

Edward J. O'Neill/National Fish and Wildlife Service

Upper Klamath Lake is full of food for fish. 

So it's a bit of a mystery why big fish like redband trout leave the lake and head into its tributaries, where there's less food. 

Oregon Fish and Wildlife has a new tool in potentially solving the mystery: radio tags in the fish.  The tags will help ODFW track fish movements in and around the lake. 

Wikimedia

The plight of bees in recent years produced a swelling of concern about pollinators. 

Bees are not the only pollinators, and the others have problems, too. 

Take the monarch butterfly, for example.  A report published last month by the Xerces Society in Portland shows a huge drop in monarchs gathering at winter sites in California, down 74% in two decades. 

Simon & Schuster

He was a 19-year-old sailor ashore in Japan.  She was a 31-year-old Japanese woman. 

It sounds like the beginning to a song, but it's a true story for Paul Brinkley-Rogers, former sailor and Pulitzer-winning journalist. 

It's a love story too big to fit in a web caption... but fits well in Brinkley-Rogers' memoir Please Enjoy Your Happiness

Willamettans Family Nudist Resort

On those hot sticky days, some of us wonder why we wear clothes at all.  Then there are the people who stopped wondering years ago. 

Nudists gather in Springfield this week for the annual convention of the American Association for Nude Recreation

As the name implies, members spend plenty of time in the nude--they hasten to add, in appropriate places. 

MatthewDiffee.com

There are cartoonists, and then there are New Yorker cartoonists. 

Getting a cartoon into the famous magazine is a mark of success, one Matthew Diffee has received many times over.  He is also the winner of a Reuben Award, something like a cartoonist's Oscar. 

Matt Diffee and his new book Hand Drawn Jokes for Smart Attractive People show up together at the Eugene Library on Saturday at 2 PM. 

NPR

A lot of what we know about the world got locked up a long time ago.  What if we're just plain wrong? 

The NPR podcast "Invisibilia" explores the forces that shape our world and influence our behavior.  We give the second hour of the Exchange time slot over to "Invisibilia" for seven straight Fridays, ending in September. 

Enjoy the stories and the science that make the show unique. 

This week: Most of us believe our personalities, and those of our loved ones, are predictable and constant over time.  But what if they aren’t? 

Jami Dwyer/Wikimedia

When and where to cut trees is a constant topic of debate in our part of the world. 

In other areas, it's less a debate than a mourning process, as vast areas that were once forest become agricultural land... minus the trees. 

Researchers Yann le Polain de Waroux (Stanford) and Rachael Garrett (Boston U.) studied the process in parts of Latin America. 

Wikimedia

One of the more spectacular movies of the silent era is largely a product of Oregon. 

"The General," Buster Keaton's film commemorating a famous railroad chase during the Civil War, was shot on a now-abandoned railroad east of Cottage Grove. 

Now the film is coming home, so to speak, on a tour of Oregon with spanking-new score by Portland composer Mark Orton.  "Score" in this sense means performed LIVE while the film plays on the screen.

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