The Jefferson Exchange

News & Information: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook and Twitter.  Find the News & Information station list here.

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A special edition of our "Curious" segment is geared to the celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr's birthday. 

University of Oregon associate professor Curtis Austin has researched the civil rights and black power movements extensively. 

He tracks the rise of the movements and the responses to them... from the public, the government, and police, among others. 

Dr. Austin visits with some insights into the history of the struggle for equality in America. 

bellhardware.com

The official name is still "Bell Hardware," but it's not the kind of business where you go buy a screwdriver. 

This third-generation business is now focused primarily on doors and frames and other components of getting people into commercial buildings... or keeping them out. 

John Bell is the grandson of the company founder, and Bell Hardware, still based in Klamath Falls, has outlets from Portland to Redding. 

Andreas Praefcke/Wikimedia

Can you imagine spending a day in the White House, with all the important people and egos and pressing business? 

Yet it is from the White House, in a sense, that we get advice on Treating People Well in a new book by Lea Berman and Jeremy Bernard. 

They were social secretaries: Berman worked in the Bush White House, Bernard with the Obamas. 

And they learned a thing or two about maintaining civility in high-pressure situations. 

socompasshouse.org

Mental illness is not good for anyone.  It can endanger the life of the ill person, often by their own decision.  Suicide is a constant challenge for mental health professionals and the people they serve. 

At Compass House in Medford, several club members have stories to tell about considering or attempting suicide. 

We meet one of them, Mary C., in this month's edition of Compass Radio. 

M.O. Stevens/Wikimedia

Restoring some of the famed fish runs of the West will take some time. 

And it often appears that recovery happens a stream at a time. 

Trout Unlimited in Oregon recently touted a pair of projects designed to improve conditions for fish, in streams in Deschutes and Klamath County. 

ESO/B. Tafreshi (twanight.org), CC BY 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=21595070

The decades-long slide in church attendance prompts some people to think that we're not as moral as we once were. 

Michael Shermer, professional skeptic, begs to differ.  He says we're living in the most moral period in human history... and it's guided by science and reason, not religion. 

Shermer makes the case in his book The Moral Arc: How Science and Reason Lead Humanity toward Truth, Justice, and Freedom

There's plenty to think about when you're homeless.  Where you'll find shelter and food, how you'll stay healthy... and many more basic concerns about life itself. 

And then there's the fact that many people avoid, distrust, fear, and even hate homeless people. 

Our series of interviews on homelessness, "Out in the Cold," explores issues and offered solutions for homeless people in the region. 

Our attention turns to Shasta County, with Larry Olmstead from United Way of Northern California and Jonathan Anderson of the Good News Rescue Mission

Szánthó Zoltán, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49501159

Trump and The Book.  Those four words make an impactful statement at the moment, as the White House deals with the revelations in Michael Wolfe's book "Fire and Fury."  

That's one of several major stories simmering on the media stove at the moment. 

Others: Oprah at the Golden Globes, net neutrality gets a vote in Congress, and more. 

There's always something new to digest and discuss in Signals & Noise, our monthly conclave with members of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

Michael Richardson/Wikimedia

Chris Bratt is all about the trees.  He has plenty of experience using wood products from his days as a carpenter and contractor. 

And he's perfectly happy to leave the trees alone to grow, in his role as an environmental activist and forest protector. 

Chris Bratt's story is the latest to be archived in the Stories of Southern Oregon collection at the Southern Oregon Digital Archives at Southern Oregon University's Hannon Library. 

Chris visits the studio to talk about his rich and varied life in the Applegate Valley. 

Library of Congress/Wikimedia

2018 is a milestone, and not a happy one, in remembering the life of Martin Luther King, Jr.  It was 50 years ago that an assassin's bullet killed the civil rights leader in Memphis. 

But Monday January 15th is not for mourning, it is for celebrating the birthday and life of Dr. King. 

Ashland hosts one of the larger celebrations, often playing to overflow crowds. 

Cassie Fetty is the director and curator of the event, one of several planned for the region. 

Austin Jenkins/Northwest News Network

Josephine County Commissioners upset a lot of marijuana farmers when they passed a new ordinance in December. 

It bans commercial cannabis farming on rural residential lots five acres or smaller and creates other new regulations. 

In the eyes of the farmers who use such lands, the county "stole their business."  Attorney Ross Day represents cannabis growers. 

Wikimedia/Public Domain

The work of Chinese superstar artist and dissident Ai Weiwei is currently part of the collection at the University of Oregon's Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

The display features the 12 figures of the Chinese Zodiac, cast in bronze. 

They can be enjoyed on several levels: as art, as animal heads, and as a statement about looting and repatriation.  The Zodiac heads are recreations of figures that once stood in Beijing and were looted by British and French troops in the 19th century. 

If you've only been paying attention to marijuana laws for a couple of decades, it can look like pot is on a bit of a high of its own. 

State after state, including California and Oregon, has legalized marijuana for medical or personal use or both.  This moment looked like a sure thing a couple of generations ago. 

But then a backlash began against marijuana and other drugs. 

Emily Dufton tracks the trajectory in Grass Roots: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Marijuana in America

Wikimedia

There's general agreement that opioid abuse has reached epidemic levels in our country. 

People from coast to coast started taking prescription drugs designed to counter pain, and now they can't stop. 

A teacher at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in Portland says primary care physicians should be the key players in curbing opioid addictions, but they lack the support they need.  She outlines the issue in a recent essay in the journal Health Affairs

Being homeless in the winter is a reality facing hundreds, possibly thousands, of people in the region.  Public and private agencies are set up to assist people, but there are still more people who need help. 

Our series of interviews on local homelessness, "Out in the Cold," continues with a look at the situation and responses in Humboldt County. 

Affordable Homeless Housing Alternatives, or AHHA, and Eureka Rescue Mission provide help to homeless people. 

subberculture, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=38492191

Do you see shapes in the clouds, or a face formed by the bathtub valves and spout?  Our brains just see patterns, it helps us navigate the world. 

But the KINDS of patterns we detect are shaped by culture, and those perceptions help shape our history.  That's the road on which Jeremy Lent takes us in his book The Patterning Instinct: A Cultural History of Humanity's Search for Meaning

The author calls his approach "cognitive history," and takes in points of history like the European view of the conquest of nature... which led to Europe conquering much of the world. 

Tony Hisgett, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27697090

When you think about it, radio is a good place to discuss issues with our cars and trucks. 

Because half the battle in getting a mechanic to understand the problem with a car is describing the noise it makes. 

Zach Edwards has heard a few noises, both original and recreated, in his years fixing cars and owning Ashland Automotive.  He joins us for a monthly chat about car problems, and we welcome your input. 

United Nations, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=59070111

Richard Haass thinks a lot about the state of international relations in his role as president of the Council on Foreign Relations. 

He wrote A World in Disarray before Donald Trump took office, and added some thoughts on the last year in a new paperback version of the book. 

In short, the structures that guided the world out of World War II and away from World War III are now out of date, in Haass's estimation. 

Public Domain

More than a few politicians have won elections by stoking the fears of the American people.  In the analysis of historian Elaine Tyler May, it has become increasingly easy to do. 

From the middle of the 20th century and onward, May tracks a rising obsession with security--one she says has actually made us LESS safe.  May lays out the case in her book  Fortress America: How We Embraced Fear and Abandoned Democracy

Look at prison populations, gun laws, and gated communities; the book references all these and more. 

two-on-tap.com

First Friday Art Walk is an event in several communities in the region. 

We honor them and jump on the bandwagon with our monthly First Friday Arts segment. 

It's deceptively simple... we open the phone lines at 800-838-3760 and invite people to call with news of arts events going on in the coming weeks.  Nothing but listener content here. 

Grab a seat by the radio and hear about arts offerings for January. 

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