The Jefferson Exchange

News & Information: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook and Twitter.  Find the News & Information station list here.

Or suggest a guest for The Exchange.

Don Hankins, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12398591

Break out the tie-dye, the Country Fair is back soon.  The R is not an accident. 

The Oregon Country Fair is different from a county fair: less livestock, more sustainability. 

What began as a renaissance fair decades ago stuck around, something of an outpost of 60s counter-culture in our time. 

Charlie Ruff is the boss of the OCF and our guest once again. 

University of Oregon

We have mixed feelings in our country about refugees who arrive on our shores seeking a safe place far from wars. 

But we forget that human beings in our own region felt the same impulse in the middle of the 19th century.  That's when the series of battles and skirmishes collectively known as the Rogue Indian War disrupted life in the region. 

One site of particular interest to archaeologists is the Harris Cabin, near Merlin in Josephine County.  The Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology has studied the site for years now. 

It is the focus of this month's edition of "Underground History." 

Wikimedia/Public Domain

While Congress is still debating the near future of the American health insurance system, how about a refresher course in the healthcare system itself? 

Sociologist Paul Starr won a Pulitzer Prize for his 1983 book The Social Transformation of American Medicine.  It tracks huge changes over the country's life... like the huge rise in money for practitioners, the rise in corporate control, and the constant blocking of a truly national health insurance. 

And it's newly updated, with a fresh preface and epilogue tracking changes since publication. 

Wikimedia

Anybody who's ever flown has an airline or airport horror story.

But this much can be said: planes seldom collide in the skies. The federal air traffic control system is robust and effective.

President Trump wants to spin the operations off to a private entity, and there are questions from members of Congress and local airport managers.

The Rogue Valley International-Medford airport is the region's largest commercial airport (south of Eugene, that is).

Lucas/Wikimedia

When we have differing opinions and can't even agree upon the facts, is there any point in trying to have a conversation? 

Yes, say Marla Estes and Rob Schläpfer. 

They offer workshops on “How to Change Minds (Including Your Own)" to provide some guidance for people who really do think a little dialogue might go a long way to reducing the current polarized state of American discussion. 

A session by that title comes to the Medford library on Saturday, July 1, part of The Weekly Talk series.

Loving Wine, For Beginners

Jun 27, 2017
wine-allthetime.com

Marissa Ross is fond of wine, you might learn from the picture. 

There are several iterations of that pose, with different outfits and wines and backdrops.  One thing stays the same: Marissa writes about wine and has few qualifications to do so. 

Think of her as writing wine-for-dummies blogs and books.  One book, anyway, called Wine. All The Time: The Casual Guide to Confident Drinking

Cascadia Wildlands

Suction dredging is gone from many streams in Oregon, never to return. 

The legislature recently passed, and the governor signed, a bill making a "temporary" moratorium on the gold mining process permanent. 

Environmental groups who want to see more fish in the streams are thrilled.  You can guess how miners feel about it. 

But you don't have to: Tom Kitchar of the Waldo Mining District talks to us about suction dredging. 

Michael Beug

If you are at all into eating mushrooms, can you tell the yummy from the deadly?

Identifying mushrooms can be a very tricky process, with very high stakes in making a mistake. 

More than a dozen people have been sickened in Northern California over the last year from eating toxic mushrooms like Amanita phalloides. 

Debbie Viess from the Bay Area Mycological Society is an expert on Amanitas.  Michael Beug, professor emeritus at  The Evergreen State College, also shares some 'shroom thoughts.

TKO: Racial Tension Spurs Ashland School Board Candidate

Jun 26, 2017
Eric E. Johnson/Flickr

Ashland takes pride in thinking of itself as an open, caring, multicultural community. 

But comments and threats to people of color roiled the city in recent years, and it has produced some community-wide soul-searching.  And a candidate for a vacant seat on the Ashland School Board. 

Kamilah Long works for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and wants the spot, saying she could be an effective voice for students of color.  Long reports an increase in hate speech in the schools as well as on the streets. 

Her candidacy and the factors that led to it are this month's topic on The Keenest Observers, hosted by Robert Goodwin. 

U.S. Navy/Public Domain

It's a familiar story in American health care: people getting their primary medical care from a hospital emergency room instead of a primary care physician. 

The air and ground ambulance service Mercy Flights teamed up with Jackson Care Connect to try a new approach in Jackson County. 

And the pairing got a grant to test the theory.  It worked: people who got regular visits from paramedics in non-emergency situations cut their ER visits in half.  More than half, actually (56%). 

Wikimedia

The story is the same in many of our communities: renting a house is costly. 

Lots of people want housing, and the supply is low, driving up the price and keeping vacancies rare.  Now a minimum wage job can't provide enough money for even a basic apartment. 

Those are findings from the National Low Income Housing Coalition

We dive into the numbers with Diane Yentel, the president of NLIHC. 

VeronicaTherese/wikimedia

To hear some employers tell it, there's a lot of eye-rolling in the workplace these days: eye-rolling from the young employees given tasks, eye-rolling from the managers assigning tasks. 

Millennials do get a bad rap at work, and Crystal Kadakia explains why and how in her book The Millennial Myth: Transforming Misunderstanding into Workplace Breakthroughs

Are millennials lazy, entitled, disrespectful, and disloyal?  Kadakia says no, these are all myths. 

She addresses those and moves on to approaches to getting work done and keeping both worker and boss satisfied. 

O'Dea-Wikimedia

Oregon was a pioneer in voting to legalize marijuana for medicinal use.

The medical pot law turns 20 next year, and its future grows a bit fuzzier now that marijuana is also legal for recreational use. 

Why get a prescription for a drug you can buy over-the-counter?  That's just one of several questions raised in a series of stories from our partners at Oregon Public Broadcasting. 

Penguin Random House

Isn't nature wonderful in how it allows creatures to adapt to their surroundings? 

Well, yeah, unless you're the creature who ends up host to a parasite or something else that wrecks your life. 

Examples abound, and WIRED science writer Matt Simon serves them up in gruesome detail in his book The Wasp That Brainwashed the Caterpillar: Evolution’s Most Unbelievable Solutions to Life’s Biggest Problems.

Any effort to improve your life would probably not begin at the doorstep of an economist. 

But let's keep an open mind about this.  Adam Smith, the father of modern economics, is best known for writing about "the invisible hand" of the market. 

But he also wrote works about morality and encouraging good behavior.  Russ Roberts dug up this more heart-centered version of Smith for his own book, How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life

oregonwalktheland.org

If you follow news about land set aside for preservation, you may occasionally wonder: when can I go visit that land?  This Saturday, June 24th, is a good answer. 

That is officially Oregon Walk the Land Day, sponsored by land trusts all over the state. 

They'll lead tours pointing out the highlights of lands protected by trusts in the far-flung corners of Oregon. 

Wikimedia

Anybody alive in 1966 probably remembers the line "silver wings... upon their chest." 

It's a line from Staff Sgt. Barry Sadler's number one hit song "The Ballad of the Green Berets." 

The patriotic ode to the military made Sadler briefly famous and rich.  Neither condition lasted, as author Marc Leepson points out in a book about Sadler's frequently troubled life, Ballad of the Green Beret: The Life and Wars of Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler

Department of Defense/Public Domain

You'll bum out a lot of older Americans when you point out that the "summer of love" was 50 years ago. 

It was an exciting and pivotal year in American history, and the year Danny Goldberg graduated from high school. 

He includes his own experiences and broadens the focus in his memoir, In Search of The Lost Chord: 1967 and the Hippie Idea.

The music, the Vietnam War, the civil rights struggle and more are mixed in with personal memories of 1967 in the book. 

NASA/Public Domain

You are what you eat, as the saying goes.  So what does your diet say about your attitudes? 

Plenty, in the eyes of Will Tuttle.  Dr. Tuttle--PhD in Education--is a vegan who supports a diet that is sustainable and compassionate, among other things. 

He calls it "The World Peace Diet" and has written a book by that name. 

Michael Clapp/OPB

School's out for summer, but educators have a lot yet to talk about. 

The Oregon Education Association and its counterparts in other states sends members to the massive national Representative Assembly (RA), at the very time the Oregon Legislature is debating how much money it can spend on schools for the next two years. 

Pages