The Jefferson Exchange

News & Information: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and newsmakers from around the region and beyond. It airs on JPR's News & Information service. Choose that service from the stream above or find your station here.

Participate in the live program by calling 800-838-3760 or emailing JX@jeffnet.org

Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=68908707

Growing cannabis is now legal in both California and Oregon, but that doesn't mean all the practices involved with growing it are legal. 

The black market stubbornly holds on, using farming methods that hurt the landscape and creatures living on it.  That includes the use of pesticides, some of which are highly toxic. 

The effort to curb the use of the pesticides has made unlikely bedfellows of the state of California and the federal government, which are usually of two minds about the legality of marijuana. 

Mourad Gabriel at the University of California-Davis researches the methods of cannabis farmers, including the regular use of toxics. 

Noble Coffee Roasting/Instagram

Jared Rennie picked a good time in history to get into the coffee business. 

He started Noble Coffee Roasting in Ashland at about the time the taste for coffee products of all kinds exploded.  His belief in coffee certainly paid off in the success of his business. 

His is truly a story of knowing when to get in on the ground floor. 

Alexas_Fotos/Pixabay

Are we in love with bees?  And sadly, is it too late for the relationship? 

Bees have been around a long time and are a critical part of life on Earth, but they are in deep trouble in many areas. 

Conservation biologist Thor Hanson, who joined us in the past with his book on seeds, returns with his latest: Buzz: The Nature and Necessity of Bees

From the evolutionary roots of 125 million years ago to the pollinator gardens of today, there's a lot to learn. 

João Felipe C.S./Public Domain

The supermarket age is all about food traveling great distances to reach us.  So the chance of getting to know the people who grow your food is limited. 

Unless you buy local food... which is encouraged by many people these days.  The Rogue Valley Farm Tour enhances the eat-local experience by taking people out to meet the farmers. 

Ashland Food Co-op and Medford Food Co-op are partners on the tour. 

socompasshouse.org

Mental illness often shows up early in adulthood, but it can affect a person earlier in life. 

This month on Compass Radio we hear from Debra, a Southern Oregon Compass House member who has experienced episodes of mental illness since childhood.

She told Compass House interviewer Bryce Harding that her illness first manifested itself in the form of premonitions – she would actually predict events before they happened. 

ivanovgood/Pixabay

Even having a room full of people greet you unexpectedly can be stressful.  Especially if they jump out from behind the furniture and yell "Surprise!" 

Not all of us appreciate surprises, even the good ones.  But unexpected events--things we simply can't control--can be good for us. 

That's Tania Luna's take in her book Surprise: Embrace the Unpredictable and Engineer the Unexpected.  She's built a whole business based on surprises. 

Erich Ferdinand, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=63988292

Methane is perhaps the most potent of greenhouse gases, and California has 1.8 million emitters of methane walking around on four legs.  Dairy cows "give off" methane in ways you'd expect (think the back end), and ways you might not: they burp. 

Cow burps are methane-rich.  But experiments at the University of California-Davis show that the addition of just a little seaweed to a cow's diet can greatly reduce the burps. 

Forest Service/Public Domain

The emerald ash borer is an invasive pest that has devastated ash tree populations in the rest of the country. It's not in Oregon yet, but it's just a matter of time before it shows up.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture has just released its action plan for fighting the pest when it arrives.  Notice the use of the term "when," not "if." 

Ash trees are important in the ecosystem, especially in riparian zones along creeks and rivers.

Wyatt Williams helped write the response plan for the insect at the Oregon Department of Forestry. 

Public Domain

Wake up.  Go to sleep.  Run away.  Stay and fight.  Have you figured out the common connection yet?  It's hormones, which influence these and many of our behaviors. 

And boy, does life change--frequently for the poorer--when our hormones get out of balance. 

Medical journalist Randi Hutter Epstein spins a rich history of hormone discoveries and misuses in the book Aroused: The History of Hormones and How They Control Just About Everything

Bureau of Land Management / Flickr

There's a certain regularity to some stories emerging from Washington, like the program that will soon expire if Congress does not renew it. 

So it is once again with the Land and Water Conservation Fund, LWCF.  It runs out at the end of September without Congressional intervention, and there may just be some additional concern about the mood on conservation in the current Congress. 

The Wilderness Society is watching events unfold, as is University of Idaho professor Adam Sowards

Save The Redwoods League

You can find Humboldt martens, weasel-like mammals, in just two places: Oregon's Siuslaw National Forest, and the Siskiyou portion of Oregon's Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.  That's it. 

And that's why the group Cascadia Wildlands wants the marten protected under the state's Endangered Species Act. 

The best estimate is 200 animals left. 

Wikimedia

Can you name even one American religious leader who is a woman?  The people who garner attention from the general public tend to be men. 

But there are plenty of examples of women working in spiritual matters who have had great influence. 

Adrian Shirk, who teaches women's studies and creative writing, writes of these remarkable women in And Your Daughters Shall Prophesy: Stories from the Byways of American Women and Religion

It's warm, it's light late into the evening, and we have a little spare time. 

That's the reason summer is so conducive to a little extra reading.  Or a lot, if we're lucky. 

Our Summer Reads segment returns for a second summer, visiting with local and locally-owned bookstores to get ideas for good summertime reads. 

Bloomsbury Books in Ashland starts off the weekly series.  Sheila Burns from Bloomsbury drops by to drop some book titles.  And she's bringing Eileen Bobek, the owner of Jacksonville's new bookstore, Rebel Heart Books with her. 

Brian Robert Marshall, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12577801

It's doubtful that anyone ever turns on a light in California and thinks about the Independent System Operator

But the ISO provides oversight to the power grid in California, to make sure the country's most populous state always has electricity available.  Now there's a proposal, backed by Governor Jerry Brown and others, to share oversight of the grid with other western states. 

That has drawn criticism from a number of groups.  But it is praised by others, including the Union of Concerned Scientists

Southern Oregon Digital Archive

The voice may sound familiar: Diana Coogle delivered audio essays on JPR News for years. 

Now she's back to talk about her own life story, as it involves a commune, Houkola, in the Colestin Valley by the state line. 

That story is the focus of this month's Stories of Southern Oregon, compiled and curated by Maureen Flanagan Battistella. 

Adrián Cerón/Wikimedia

The idea of our wounded younger selves continuing to haunt us into adulthood was brought up years ago by many experts on the mind.  So by now, the idea of an "inner child" should sound familiar. 

Therapist Susan Anderson is more concerned with another part of us, the OUTER child. 

She writes of the issues raised, and how to deal with them, in Taming Your Outer Child: Overcoming Self-Sabotage and Healing from Abandonment

Forest Service/Public Domain

Rivers are powerful things, in the physical world and in our imaginations. 

But do you really understand where rivers come from and how their courses are set?  Sean W. Fleming, a geoscientist and a bit of a poet, considers rivers both as bodies of water and as metaphors. 

Fleming's book is Where the River Flows: Scientific Reflections on Earth's Waterways

Signals & Noise & New Building & VR

Jul 6, 2018

It seems appropriate that we have a robust discussion of the media in JPR's brand-new home. 

Monday, July 9th, will be the first day in the long-awaited (49 years) history of JPR broadcasting from someplace OTHER than a basement.  And our friends from the Communications faculty at Southern Oregon University return for this month's edition of Signals & Noise. 

Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi will discuss items in a broad range of media, from virtual reality to books.  In fact, we plan to use a VR camera to record this first live segment in the new place. 

National Archives of The Netherlands

The first world war was unimaginable for many people.  Then it happened again, just a generation later. 

How did Europe, considered the center of civilization, devolve into belligerence and barbarity TWICE in such a short amount of time? 

The Penguin History of Europe series asked that question, and historian Ian Kershaw answered, in To Hell and Back: Europe 1914-1949

Colorado Public Radio

July can be the hottest month of the year, in several senses of the word. 

Even if the weather does not produce totally scorching days, the arts scene is cooking with numerous events, many of them outdoors. 

Our First Friday Arts segment scans the landscape for events on stages and in galleries throughout the region. 

And it's ALL listener-generated content. 

What we put on the air on First Friday is the phone calls we receive.  Put an event on the table (and on the air) by calling 800-838-3760. 

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