To The Best Of Our Knowledge

News & Information: Sat • 1pm-3pm | Sun • Noon-2pm
  • Hosted by Anne Strainchamps

A thoughtful and penetrating interview magazine featuring nationally and internationally-known guests whose passion for new ideas challenge and engage.

I dunno, but it seems kind of extreme, not to mention risky, to bio-engineer a mass mosquito die-off.  So Steve Paulson tracked down the world’s greatest living entomologist to see what he has to say.  E. O Wilson is sometimes called “the ant man” – that’s the insect he studied most – but he’s best known as the evolutionary biologist and a champion of biodiversity.  He’s 86 years old now, and has just finished what is probably his last book – called “Half Earth”.  It’s a passionate plea to save humanity by dedicating half the planet to nature.

Playing Music with Mosquitoes

Mar 11, 2016

David Rothenberg has played music with birds and even whales. But his latest music project is much less, well, melodious…

 . . . like playing music with insects. He’s recorded songs with a lot of them -- crickets and cicadas and yes, even mosquitoes.

Producer Craig Eley sat down with David Rothenberg to talk “bug music.”

Fear and Loathing in Mosquito-Land

Mar 11, 2016

We hate mosquitoes.

But why?  I mean, yes --- West Nile, dengue, malaria, Zika…not to mention ruined picnics, sleepless nights, and bites you scratch until they bleed … Those are logical reasons to dislike mosquitoes.  But admit it – they also just creep you out.

Jeffrey Lockwood gets at the psychology in his book “The Infested Mind.” He’s an entomologist who once had a truly horrific encounter with a swarm of grasshoppers.   He was left traumatized. Afterwards he wondered why we all fear and loathe insects so much.

Mosquitoes and Poverty

Mar 11, 2016

So, there’s a serious proposal on the table. Should we genetically engineer disease-carrying species of mosquitoes out of existence? The technology exists and some pretty prominent scientists think we should.

Let’s check in with Sonia Shah.  She’s a science journalist who writes about pandemics and pathogens and the social history of disease.  She wrote one of the best histories of malaria – a book called “The Fever”, and she has a pretty different perspective on the kill or be killed debate.

 

FM Supreme, Humanitarian Rap Artist

Mar 6, 2016

Jessica Disu (FM Supreme) talks about using hiphop as a positive force to deliver messages of peace and non-violence.

FM Supreme, Humanitarian Rap Artist

Mar 5, 2016

Jessica Disu (FM Supreme) talks about using hiphop as a positive force to deliver messages of peace and non-violence.

S. Alexander Reed gives us a crash course on what may be the ultimate protest music -- industrial music.

The Soundtracks of the Vietnam War

Mar 5, 2016

Vietnam was the last American war that had a collective soundtrack, but some of its songs may surprise you. We talk with Doug Bradley and Craig Werner about "We Gotta Get Out of this Place," a collection of interviews with Vietnam vets about the music that shaped their war experience.

Music writer Peter Guralnick tells us how the legendary Sam Phillips created rock and roll as a musical protest.

Over the last several years, new developments in personal health tracking products have multiplied exponentially. But human interest in measuring and tracking elements of our bodily needs stretches back hundreds of years. Professor Natasha Schüll discusses these current trends and their history, based on research she's done for a forthcoming book called "Keeping Track."

A.O. Scott on the Art of Criticism

Feb 27, 2016

In his new book “Better Living Through Criticism,” A.O. Scott distills his decades-long career into a simple to read manifesto that not only explains the qualities of a good critic, but argues their fundamental importance to any culture.

Inside Hollywood's Race Problem

Feb 27, 2016

Mike Sargent is a filmmaker and a co-founder of the Black Film Critics Circle. He spoke with Anne Strainchamps about the #OscarSoWhite campaign, and racial diversity in Hollywood.

When Killers Go Unpunished

Feb 27, 2016

Sometimes a great movie forces you to see the world in a completely different way. That’s the case with Joshua Oppenheimer’s documentary, "The Act of Killing." The film follows a former Indonesian death squad leader as he remembers and even re-enacts the atrocities he committed. 

Crying at the Movies

Feb 27, 2016

What is it exactly that we love about the movies? For Madelon Sprengnether, going to the movies prompted a journey of self discovery and helped her cope with the sudden death of her father. It all started with a Bengali film called "Pather Panchali."

Roger Ebert on Film Criticism

Feb 27, 2016

Perhaps no other person was a greater advocate for film and film criticism than Roger Ebert. With a career spanning more than 50 years, Ebert was the source America turned to for advice on what to watch week after week. A few years before his death, Roger Ebert sat down with Steve Paulson and reflected on his legendary and prolific career as a film critic.

Over the last several years, new developments in personal health tracking products have multiplied exponentially. But human interest in measuring and tracking elements of our bodily needs stretches back hundreds of years. Professor Natasha Schüll discusses these current trends and their history, based on research she's done for a forthcoming book called "Keeping Track."

Inside Hollywood's Race Problem

Feb 27, 2016

Mike Sargent is a filmmaker and a co-founder of the Black Film Critics Circle. He spoke with Anne Strainchamps about the #OscarSoWhite campaign, and racial diversity in Hollywood.

Crying at the Movies

Feb 27, 2016

What is it exactly that we love about the movies? For Madelon Sprengnether, going to the movies prompted a journey of self discovery and helped her cope with the sudden death of her father. It all started with a Bengali film called "Pather Panchali."

When Killers Go Unpunished

Feb 27, 2016

Sometimes a great movie forces you to see the world in a completely different way. That’s the case with Joshua Oppenheimer’s documentary, "The Act of Killing." The film follows a former Indonesian death squad leader as he remembers and even re-enacts the atrocities he committed. 

Plato in Palestine

Feb 20, 2016

Carlos Fraenkel wanted to take philosophy out into the streets, so he met with students at Palestinian and Egyptian universities, and found that Plato, Maimonides and other great philosophers can open up a culture of conversation and debate.

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