Liam Moriarty

Reporter/Producer

Liam Moriarty has been covering news in the Pacific Northwest for more than 20 years. He's reported on a wide range of topics – including politics, the environment, business, social issues and more – for newspapers, magazines, public radio and the web.  Liam was JPR News Director from 2002 to 2005, reporting and producing the Jefferson Daily regional news magazine. After covering the environment in Seattle, then reporting on European issues from France, he's returned to JPR, turning his talents to covering the stories and issues that are important to the people of Southern Oregon and Northern California.

Liam Moriarty/JPR

The Oregon legislature’s budget-writing committee came to southern Oregon Friday night as part of a series of hearings around the state. Lawmakers are facing a shortfall of about $1.6 billion for the next two-year budget period.

The Senate and House budget leaders – both Democrats -- have proposed a budget that makes deep cuts in many programs and services. Citizens representing a wide range of programs came out to make their case for continuing to fund what they say are essential services.

Darren Campbell

The Ashland Independent Film Festival is gearing up for its 16th season, which takes place for five days in early April. JPR reporter Jennifer Margulis has been busy getting a behind-the-scenes look at how it all happens. JPR’s Liam Moriarty invited Jennifer into the studio to tell us about it. 

Liam Moriarty/JPR News

America’s energy future is often cast as a battle that pits fossil fuels such as coal and gas against wind, solar and other renewable energy sources. But in the Pacific Northwest, we've already slashed greenhouse gas emissions -- and saved big bucks -- with a clean energy source that often doesn't even get mentioned in policy debates.

Oregon Department of Forestry

Tuesday we’ll be getting more information about the fate of Oregon’s Elliott State Forest.  You might remember that the state put the 82,000-acre public forest near Coos Bay up for sale.

Just one bid came in – led by a private timber firm.  But the State Land Board decided to hold out and see if another, more publicly-minded offer would emerge.

Late last week, Governor Kate Brown released an alternative plan. Jes Burns, of our EarthFix team, spoke with JPR’s Liam Moriarty about what’s going on. 

Liam Moriarty/JPR

The federal government has fined more than 750 hospitals across the country for scoring in the bottom 25 percent on measures of patient safety. Hospital-acquired infections, blood clots, falls and bedsores are among the avoidable injuries to patients included in the annual ranking by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

The program is meant to prod hospitals to improve patient safety. But hospital officials say the rating system doesn’t paint an accurate picture of patient care.

Liam Moriarty/JPR

An estimated 8,000 people marched through downtown Ashland Saturday to voice opposition to the new administration of President Donald Trump. The march was one of hundreds that took place across the country the day after Trump’s inauguration.

National Park Service

Opponents of proposed mining projects in the Klamath Mountains in the southwest corner of Oregon are praising a federal order withdrawing more than 100-thousand acres in the area from mining activity.

Bureau of Land Management/Flickr

Barely a week before leaving office, President Obama has used a law originally signed by Theodore Roosevelt to roughly double the size of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southwestern Oregon.

Liam Moriarty/JPR

The recent heavy snow and freezing overnight temperatures have driven hundreds of homeless people in the region to seek emergency shelter from the extreme weather. But some people do their best to tough it out.

The choice of whether to get indoors or sleep outside in sub-freezing temperatures might seem like an obvious one. But some homeless people – especially those who’ve been on the streets for years – say they’d rather not subject themselves to what they see as the hassles and indignities of crowded shelters.

 I've had a pretty contentious relationship with my online social network this past election season. My Facebook newsfeed exploded with caustic political memes, links to articles of suspect provenance and fiery rants by folks I thought I knew pretty well, but who displayed previously unrevealed anger management issues.

Oregon’s Updated Streamside Logging Rules Get A Chilly Response

Dec 25, 2016

Cilde Grover braces herself with her cane as she ducks through a small arch in the pasture fence.

“Molly, come!” she calls out, as her dog bounds ahead and blurs into the forest in the misty distance.

Grover remembers wide open pastures on her family's homestead near Brookings in Oregon's southwestern-most corner. That was back in the 1950s and '60s, when she and her three sisters were growing up. But now the trees have the upper hand.

“I look around and I go 'it's closing in on me!'" she laughs, glancing around at the forest all around her.

Liam Moriarty/JPR

Progress has been made in recent years in decreasing homelessness, especially among veterans. But the spiraling cost of housing still leaves many people with few affordable options.

Now, inspired by the success of similar projects in the Pacific Northwest, a group in Medford is  building a tiny-house village that offers hope of breaking the cycle of poverty and homelessness. 

Liam Moriarty/JPR

The recent election saw California and three other states join Oregon, Washington, Colorado and Alaska in legalizing recreational use of marijuana. Four more states voted for medical cannabis, as well.

But the burgeoning cannabis industry has relied on an Obama Administration policy of tolerating state laws that regulate a drug that’s still federally illegal. With a new administration taking over in Washington DC, what does this mean for legal pot?

JPR News

After serving less than half of his four-year term as Jackson County Sheriff, Corey Falls has announced his plans to resign at the end of the year.

The Siskiyou/Moro Campaign/JPArt

Former Ashland mayor Alan DeBoer has won a slim victory over Rogue Valley Transit District chair Tonia Moro.  Republican Deboer held on to a 50-49 percent lead -- just over 500 votes -- over his Democratic rival in the race for Oregon's 3rd Senate seat. 

Pammarshfororegon.com

Ashland city councilor Pam Marsh has easily defeated her Republican challenger to win a seat held since 2005 by retiring Democrat Peter Buckley. As of 7 a..m. Wednesday, Marsh was leading Steven Richie by 62 to 37 percent.

Liam Moriarty/JPR

A pair of Republican legislative candidates whose unorthodox entry into their races raised hackles around the Klamath Basin have handily won over their challengers.

A bit of covert political sleight of hand has made a pair of legislative races in south central Oregon the focus of attention this election season. JPR’s Liam Moriarty sorts out who’s who in the oddest of this year’s legislative races.

The Siskiyou/Moro Campaign/JPArt

The race for the Third Senate District in southern Oregon was triggered by the sudden death in August of Dr. Alan Bates. Bates, a Democrat, was widely respected, especially for his work on health care issues.

Now, Democrat Tonia Moro – an attorney -- and Republican Alan DeBoer -- an auto-dealer -- are each making the case that they are the best choice to succeed Bates in a race that has implications for the balance of power in Salem.

Anna Reed/Statesman Journal

The powerful Pacific storm that raked the Northwest coast with high winds and heavy rain since Friday began easing Saturday evening,  after dropping trees and power lines across the region. 

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