Geoffrey Riley

News Director | Jefferson Exchange Host

Geoffrey Riley began practicing journalism in the State of Jefferson nearly three decades ago, as a reporter and anchor for a Medford TV station. It was about the same time that he began listening to Jefferson Public Radio, and thought he might one day work there. He was right.

Geoff came to JPR as a backup host on The Jefferson Exchange in late 2000, and he assumed the full-time host job at the beginning of 2010. The two hours of the Exchange allow him to join our listeners in exploring issues both large and small, local and global. In addition to hosting The Exchange, Geoff oversees JPR’s news department as its News Director.

Geoff is a New York native, with stints in broadcast news in Missouri, Alabama, and Wisconsin before his arrival in Oregon. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup

People on the West Coast have been talking for years about the pending earthquake in the Cascadia Subduction Zone.

It took ONE article in the New Yorker to sweep through social media and rekindle the quake concerns. 

And they are well-placed... damage from a Cascadia quake would rattle the ground and everything on it, likely from California to British Columbia. 

Geologists say one could happen at any time. 

Lomakatsi Restoration Project

Forest restoration can be a learning experience as well as a benefit for the environment.

And it IS, in the Ashland Watershed Summer youth Training and Employment Program. 

Lomakatski Restoration Project is one of the partners in the Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project, and Lomatski adds high school juniors and seniors to its workforce in the summer, both for learning and for pay. 

HarperCollins

Imagine the danger in fighting wildland fires.

Now imagine fighting wildland fires AFTER jumping out of an airplane. 

Jason Ramos does it for a living, and tells his story in the book Smokejumper

Oregon Health Authority

The Oregon Legislature's session was bound to have a few wobbles this year.

Having the governor resign a month into his term shook up state government at many levels. 

The legislature got back on track and completed its work on a two-year budget for schools, prisons, police, and all of the responsibilities of state government. 

But it left some business unfinished, too, like a major bill to fix up Oregon's transportation infrastructure. 

House Speaker Tina Kotek presided over half of the legislative apparatus.  

Wikimedia

The dream in breast cancer treatment is a simple one: that one day women will be able to take a pill, and the cancer will disappear.

Until that day, the key to treatment is early detection.  And Providence Medford Medical Center's Leila J. Eisenstein Breast Center is installing state-of-the-art devices for just that purpose. 

3-D imaging machines will help doctors find smaller lumps in breast tissue, allowing earlier diagnosis. 

Simon & Schuster

The title characters are the big timbers in Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet".

But there are other characters who act like the glue binding the play together. 

Those include Juliet's nurse, the main character in the novel called, fittingly, Juliet's Nurse.

Portlander Lois Leveen is the author of this look at one of the legendary settings of Shakespeare from a different angle. 

Wikimedia

Jail space tends to be at a premium in our region.

Funding is often tight, and cells are limited in the best of circumstances. 

So jail cells are not the best places for drunk or drugged people to "sleep it off", especially if they have not committed any crime.

Grants Pass will be home to a "sobering center" by sometime next year, a non-jail place for substance abusers to get straight. 

The Oregon Legislature approved funding for it last month. 

The prospect of avoiding war with Iran started a cold war OVER a deal with Iran on nuclear weapons.

Here's your chance to weigh in... the Iran nuclear deal is one of the topics on VENTSday this week. 

The other: use of domestic drones, becoming an issue for firefighting aircraft in the region. 

Southern Oregon Historical Society

We often refer to a camping trip as "roughing it."

But a perusal of camping in the old days gives a whole new meaning to the term "rough." 

Our ancestors who wanted to spend time at Crater Lake had to plan on a long, dusty journey, and a primitive existence while in the park. 

Historian and Park Service volunteer Larry Smith presents a program on camping at Crater Lake at the Southern Oregon Historical Society center in Medford on Saturday. 

Wikimedia

We're not even halfway through the summer, and drought concerns are rising, even in normally well-watered parts of Oregon.

Junction City recently had to declare a "moderate" water emergency and restrict water uses. 

EWEB in Eugene is keeping an eye on low river flows caused by the lack of snowpack. 

And Ashland is poised to increase warnings about water use, if its major reservoir drops below a certain level. 

Wikimedia

People go hungry in America, despite the country's wealth.

And in Eugene, one program to provide food to the hungry keeps the effort compact: in a tortilla, in fact. 

The Burrito Brigade provides burritos--all vegan--to hungry local people and travelers on Sundays. 

Jimbelushi.ws

Jim Belushi's web page identifies him as a performer.

Not just an actor, or singer, or comedian, but a performer. 

His latest gig is building a cabin along the Rogue River, chronicled in his TV show "Building Belushi."

And Belushi's newfound allegiance to Southern Oregon has him appearing in a benefit concert for the Holly Theatre restoration on August 29th.

oregoncarepartners.com

When you've got concerns about the treatment of a child, you call the state child welfare agency.

When you've got concerns about an older adult in long-term care in Oregon, you call the office of the Long Term Care Ombudsman

The office--one of many across the country--investigates everything from physical abuse to bad food in long-term care facilities, and volunteers power the program. 

Wikimedia

Moving an older family member into a nursing home is hard enough.

In Humboldt County, it's nearly impossible at the moment for families receiving MediCal, the state's version of Medicaid. 

And the North Coast Journal says it's not because there's not enough space... it's because the company that owns the majority of the skilled nursing facilities wants more money per patient from the state. 

kimberlycarlsonwriter.com

Kimberly Carlson's novel "Out of the Shadows" combines two of her passions: a love of writing and concerns about the people of Darfur, in Africa.

Carlson is a Humboldt State graduate now living and teaching in Redding. 

She has also participated in the efforts of Amnesty International and Genocide No More/Save Darfur to bring relief and hope to the Darfuri. 

Yurok Tribe

Northern California's Yurok Tribe is taking a greater hand in the administration of justice to its members.

The tribe recently opened a new justice center in Klamath, and is making plans to move juvenile cases from state court to tribal court. 

The juvenile court plans are part of a larger vision for younger Yuroks through the Yurok Youth Wellness Project.

Wikimedia

Recent discussions of the warm-water "Blob" in the Pacific may have obscured previously existing concerns about ocean health.

Like the increasing level of acidity in the ocean, and the more frequent appearance of low-oxygen zones (hypoxia). 

The West Coast Ocean Acidification & Hypoxia Science Panel brings together top minds from the West Coast State and British Columbia to come up with ideas for addressing the ocean issues. 

The panel presents a progress update at a meeting in Sacramento next week (July 29), with several reports due this fall. 

Henry Holt and Company

We've come a long way from the days when we described the other creatures on the Earth simply as "beasts" or "dumb animals."

We certainly understand animal behavior better over time. But do we understand it well enough to have an idea of what animals think and feel?

Carl Safina is trying. Safina is an ecologist and the host of the PBS series "Saving the Ocean."

Wikimedia

Some people come to Mount Shasta just to gawk at the mountain.

But others come for recreation, and big things are in the offing for them. 

The "100 Miles of Trails" campaign makes its intent clear by its name. 

And free summer concerts at Shastice Park on Sundays at 6:30 support the campaign. 

Backcountry Press

Newcomers to the State of Jefferson often ask about the plant with the green leaves and orange or purple branches, the one that seems to have lost its bark.

Old-timers ask back: “the tree or the bush?” The tree is the madrone, the bush is manzanita.

And the bush is the star of a new book, Field Guide to Manzanitas, the work of Michael Kauffmann, Tom Parker, and Michael Vasey.

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