Eric Teel

Director of FM Network Programming / Music Director

After a failed attempt at structured music instruction at Washington State University, Eric found himself standing in front of the renowned Edward R. Murrow College of Communication with two full years of radio experience already under his belt. The path was clear, and the broadcast journalism degree was obtained.

Over the next 20-plus years, Eric has drawn upon his extensive music knowledge to host programs in nearly every genre for commercial and public radio. He joined the JPR staff in 1996, hosting Siskiyou Music Hall from JPR’s Redding studios. In 2002, he moved to Ashland and took over as one of the hosts of Open Air. In addition to music, he’s put his journalism background to use reporting for NPR, managing JPR's award-winning newsroom, and producing feature-length public radio specials carried nationwide.

As FM Network Program Director, Eric oversees all aspects of JPR's broadcast day. He still hosts the occasional Open Air shift, and now handles JPR’s growing series of live in-studio music performances.

When not at work (which is nearly never) he can be seen in the crowd or on stage at music events around the region, or finishing solidly mid-pack in bicycle races in an effort to make his fitter friends feel better.

Brett Dennen’s music career began humbly around the camps of the Sierra Nevada mountain range – a retreat to which he would eventually return for inspiration on 2013's Smoke and Mirrors. “Being in the mountains, aside from the inspiration, was so crucial to me, because as a kid I used to spend so much time in the mountains. And just being there helped me regain that self-confidence. I remembered who I was.

Tonight at 6pm, JPR will broadcast NPR's coverage and analysis of the 1st Presidential Debate at Hofstra University, Hempstead, New York. The debate will be moderated by NBC’s Lester Holt and divided into three 30-minute segments: the direction of America, Achieving Prosperity and Securing America. Holt will open each segment with a question, after which each candidate will have two minutes to respond. Candidates will then have an opportunity to respond to each other. The moderator will use the balance of the time in the segment for a deeper discussion of the topic.

On Friday, October 14th at Noon, JPR's Live Sessions series continues with the Texas duo Dawn and Hawkes.

ZZ Ward burst onto the scene with her fiery Eleven Roses mixtape in early 2012 – sparking a media frenzy and showcasing her soulful take on a blues/hip hop blend, which ultimately led to her critically-acclaimed debut album Til The Casket Drops. Her debut single off the album, the foot-stomping “Put The Gun Down,” broke into the Top 10 on the AAA radio chart – staying there for 10 weeks and was followed by two more Top 10 singles, her anthemic "365 Days" and her gut-wrenching ballad "Last Love Song."

Soleil Rowan

A founding member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band (now in their 50th year!) John McEuen has continually performed since 1964 - 8,500 concerts and 300 television shows throughout more than 3 million miles - with the band and as a solo performer. Beyond performing, he has a rich history of creating, producing and preserving original and traditional folk and acoustic music, and taking it to new audiences.

On Saturday afternoon, October 15th at the conclusion of the San Francisco Opera broadcast, JPR will welcome the Danish String Quartet into the studio for a live performance.

Danielle Kelly

Allen Stone started working his dazzling vocals as a kid, thanks largely to his parents’ influence. “My father was a minister so I spent about half my childhood in church, watching my mom and dad sing together and lead the congregation in song,” he recalls. By the time he was 11 he’d picked up a guitar and written his first song, and soon began self-recording demo tapes to pass along to classmates. Although Stone enrolled in bible college after high school, he quickly dropped out to move to Seattle and kickstart his music career. “I had an ’87 Buick and I’d drive up and down the west coast, playing any gig I could get just to try to put my music out there,” he says.

Beginning Sunday evening, October 2nd, JPR's Classics & News Service will begin airing the new season of weekly programs called Concerts from the Library of Congress.

On Friday, September 23rd, JPR will broadcast an NPR News special called The Making of Clinton and Trump: Character in the 2016 Election.

Eric Teel

Hailing from Detroit, Michigan, Empty Houses is an indie pop band with a strong retro flavor that borrows from the iconic sounds of Motown and Phil Spector. The band was formed by multi-instrumentalists Dave Mackinder and Adam Mercer, both of pop-punkers Fireworks, and singer Ali Shea.

Welcome to the first Stories Alive Podcast! Each episode features original stories written by young authors, transformed into audio-theater for you to enjoy!  On this episode, you'll hear stories about all types of adventures, including going to a new school! Listen in to a lizard saving the day in "Sean and the Lawnmower," by 2nd grader Madison Sink; a girl using her special magic as she enters a new school in "Sadie's Inner Magic," by 11 year old Fiona Cutler, and the amazing adventure of "Robo Trobo and the Talking Toilets," by 1st grader, Kechoa Pech.

Over the decade and a half that Rogue Wave has made music, Zach Rogue has continued to expand his band’s emotional spectrum. Drawing inspiration from the inevitable delusions of everyday American life, Rogue, his longtime bandmate Pat Spurgeon, and their fellow members have returned reinvigorated, and with a fresh sound founded on the art of patience, the fearlessness of experimenting, and the unbridled joy of creating something meaningful to help us navigate through these vacant times.

Having written his most personal collection of songs to date, Mark Charles Heidinger initially planned to strip the recording process of Vandaveer's new album down to as few elements as possible, pursuing a more direct, minimalist approach. But after huddling with vocalist, Rose Guerin, and long-time producer, Duane Lundy, they charted a new course, enveloping these autobiographical vignettes with a full spectrum of sound. And with more than a little help from their friends. The trio called in brothers-in-arms, J. Tom Hnatow, Robby Cosenza and Justin Craig, for a prolonged session of sonic wayfinding.

On Tuesday, August 23rd, As It Was, JPR's daily series of audio vignettes on the history of southern Oregon and northern California will reach a significant milestone: 3,000 episodes!

Folk powerhouse pair The Small Glories are Cara Luft & JD Edwards, a dynamic new duo planted on the Canadian Prairies. They are a study in contrasts; Cara, all earth mother on her 21-speed bike, helmet and backpack, environmentally friendly and wholesome, ebullient and engaging; and burly JD, looking like a cross between a biker and long-haul trucker in scruffy beard, ball cap, t-shirt and jean jacket, slightly intimidating (until you meet him).

Ben Abraham's honest songwriting and disarming stage presence have seen him grow in the last two years from a well-kept hometown secret into an independent artist with a passionate international following. His distinctive soulful voice and developing reputation as a songwriter have led to recent collaborations with artists including Gotye and Sara Bareilles, and he was recently hand-picked by Emmylou Harris to support her on a national tour of Australia.

Alex Jackson was born and raised in Melbourne, Australia, started playing the guitar at age 7, and spent most of the time locked in her bedroom jumping around with a guitar practicing to AC/DC records. Alex had her first live show at age 11 at The Cherry Bar - a pub on the aptly named AC/DC Lane (which is a real street in Melbourne Australia) and has been gigging, playing, and writing songs ever since.

Multi-instrumentalist Sean Watkins has long been known for his work as one-third of the Grammy Award-winning Nickel Creek and, more recently, for helming, with sister Sara, the itinerant, genre-hopping Watkins Family Hour ensemble. But in the last year he has more assertively – and impressively – taken on the role of solo artist. What To Fear is a follow-up to 2014’s acclaimed All I Do Is Lie, which had been Watkins’ first solo effort in nearly a decade, ten years that had been jammed with collaborative projects and a herculean amount of touring.

The artist formerly known as Aaron Livingston knows his nation well. The pastiche and reach of his music is literally all over the map, and he can hear a map in his music. In it, he can recognize the places he's lived, traveled, and played to, places explored and discovered. "I hear places in the songs without trying to evoke them while writing. I can trace where a lot of my music came from, as my life and my family touch so many different places. I can hear the Gulf Coast of Louisiana in my voice, the way I say some of the words; I hear New York, definitely in my lyrics. Detroit is a place I haven't spent a ton of time in, but if I explore the music of Detroit, I can hear myself in there, too."

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