Eric Teel

Director of FM Network Programming / Music Director / Host: JPR Live Sessions

After a failed attempt at structured music instruction at Washington State University, Eric earned a broadcast journalism degree from WSU's renowned Edward R. Murrow College of Communication.

Over the next 20-plus years, Eric has drawn upon his extensive music knowledge to host programs in nearly every genre for commercial and public radio. He joined the JPR staff in 1996, hosting Siskiyou Music Hall from JPR’s Redding studios. In 2002, he moved to Ashland and took over as one of the hosts of Open Air. In addition to music, he’s put his journalism background to use reporting for NPR, managing JPR's award-winning newsroom, and producing feature-length public radio specials carried nationwide.

As FM Network Program Director, Eric oversees many aspects of JPR's broadcast day. He still hosts the occasional Open Air or classical music shift, and is the driving force behind JPR Live Sessions - JPR’s popular series of live in-studio music performances.

When not at JPR he can be seen in the crowd or on stage at music events around the region, or building hiking and biking trails in the hills around the Rogue Valley.

Gregory Varnum, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40366144

Happy Thanksgiving from the JPR staff!  We put the Exchange on hiatus for the holiday and serve up these holiday treats:

Born and raised in Sandpoint Idaho, Shook Twins are an Indie folk-pop band hailing from Portland, Oregon. Identical twins, Katelyn and Laurie are the main songwriters, but they also back up their band member Niko Slice (electric guitar, mandolin and vocals) adding his uniquely compelling songs to the mix. Barra Brown is on Drums, vocals and Drum Pad, and Josh Simon is on Bass, vocals, Electric guitar, and synth.

On Friday, December 1st at Noon, JPR will broadcast a live session with Hiss Golden Messenger on Open Air.

On Friday, November 24th at Noon, JPR will broadcast a live session with singer/songwriter David Ramirez on Open Air.

Shawn Mullins readily admits that several of the songs on his newest album, My Stupid Heart, address his perceived relationship failures. In fact, many were written as he was falling out of his third marriage; in the title tune, he actually chides himself for being such a romantic. But it's also a bit of a joke, he says, because he firmly believes in following his heart — no matter where it leads.

This Thanksgiving, JPR is serving up a few helpings of special programming for you. Here's what we've got planned...

JPR Live Session: OK Go

Nov 2, 2017

With a career that includes award-winning videos, New York Times op-eds, a major label split and the establishment of a DIY trans-media mini-empire (Paracadute), collaborations with pioneering dance companies and tech giants, animators and Muppets, and an experiment that encoded their music on actual strands of DNA, OK Go continue to fearlessly dream and build new worlds in a time when creative boundaries have all but dissolved.

The music of Kacy and Clayton exists outside of time, and burgeons with beautiful contradictions. It’s psychedelic and traditional, contemporary and vintage, melancholic and joyous. All at once, it showcases a slightly psych-folk sound of Linda Perhacs, Fleet Foxes, and First Aid Kit; rare country blues records and English folk tunes; and 1920s disaster songs and murder ballads. Their songs often are sugar-coated pills, tales of murderous jealousy, dilapidated graveyards, and infanticide, all delivered with Kacy Anderson’s sweet, lithe voice, and Clayton Linthicum’s hypnotic fingerpicking.

Chapel Hill’s indie Americana quartet Mipso are influenced by the contradiction of their progressive home and the surrounding rural southern landscapes. Currently celebrating the release of their new album Coming Down The Mountain, Mipso ventures further than ever from their string-band pedigree to discover a broader Americana where classic folk-rock and modern alt-country sounds mingle easily with Appalachian tradition. Adding drums and electric instruments to their intimate four-part harmonies and powerful acoustic meld, Mipso’s music is lush and forward moving, with words that sear and salve in turn.

Bedouine is a gallicized riff on bedouin, the nomad, the wanderer. Anyone can assume such a name, but Azniv Korkejian has an experience of what it means, the type of ground it covers. “Moving around so much caused me at some point to feel displaced, to not really belong anywhere and I thought that was a good title.” Her development was shaped by political landscapes and family opportunities, her adult life patterned by paths of her own.

On Saturday, October 6th at 11am, JPR will debut NPR's new program Hidden Brain on the News & Information Service.  Using science and storytelling, Hidden Brain reveals the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, the biases that shape our choices, and the triggers that direct the course of our relationships.

Anna Tivel has spent some quality hours in a Dodge Caravan repeating lyrical lines over and over until the words fall in time with the windshield wipers. A nationally touring artist with a deep love of quiet stories, Anna is beginning to carve a place for herself in the songwriting world. She was recently chosen a winner of both the Telluride Troubadour Contest and the Kerrville New Folk Contest, placed second at the Rocky Mountain songwriting contest, and has shared the stage with heroes and friends alike.

For nearly two decades, Willie Watson has made modern folk music rooted in older traditions. He’s a folksinger in the classic sense: a singer, storyteller, and traveler, with a catalog of songs that bridge the gap between the past and present. On Folksinger Vol. 2, he acts as a modern interpreter of older songs, passing along his own version of the music that came long before him.

The world of American roots music is no stranger to Seattle songwriter Sera Cahoone. Even though her last three albums were on Sub Pop Records and she spent years at the top of the indie charts, she’s always had a streak of Americana that ran through her music, a love of the humble folk song that bolstered her art. She’s returned now to these earliest influences with her new album, From Where I Started.

Lillie Mae has been singing and playing on stages across the country since she could stand on her own two feet. Forever and Then Some, her much anticipated Third Man Records debut, sees the Nashville-based singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist weaving her own extraordinary experiences with the myriad strains of Americana to create a breathtaking song cycle of romance and struggle, solitude and adventure.

By now you have probably heard that JPR will be moving in to a new facility early next year. If you’ve ever moved a music collection to a new house, you know just how heavy CDs can be… especially those albums you don’t really want to keep. Well, we’ve got THOUSANDS of them that we simply don’t want to move to the new building. SO… on Saturday, September 23rd with your help, we’re going to try to find them new homes. YOURS!

Bhi Bhiman's musical style has drawn a diverse range of comparisons from Rodriguez and Woody Guthrie to Nina Simone and Bill Withers. An accomplished guitarist and clever lyricist, it is Bhiman’s unique voice that truly sets him apart.

If John Prine and Mitch Hedberg had a baby, the resulting product would resemble something very close to Portland, OR singer-songwriter John Craigie. Musically comparable to Prine, with the humor and wit of Hedberg, the humble, gracious, and hilarious Craigie is one of the best storytellers of our time. It’s no wonder that Chuck Norris sends him fan mail, and Todd Snider brings him gifts on stage.

Eddie Berman grew up in Southern California and taught himself guitar and piano. He fell in love with the troubadour styles of Bob Dylan and Dave Van Ronk as a teenager and learned to fingerpick on his father’s 1950s Martin guitar, first writing his own songs as a college student at Berkeley. He made waves in the acoustic music world half a decade ago when his bedroom demos were given significant airplay on influential LA radio station KCRW.

Three years ago, Super Doppler* bought a used van, booked over 150 shows in nine months, and embarked on their first-ever national tour. There were no labels or booking agents or tour managers at the time, just a bunch of twenty-somethings with an independent streak and a shared love of making music. It wasn't glamorous — it still isn't — but they all agreed it beat the hell out of working a day job. The band pushed that van to its limits and beyond with their relentless tour schedule, developing a rapport with the tow truck drivers of the greater Norfolk, VA area as they burned through three different engines and blossomed from local favorites into one of the most promising young rock bands working today.

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