Emily Cureton

Producer | Jefferson Exchange

Born and raised in Texas, Emily Cureton found her way to the West Coast as a print journalist. She joined JPR’s newsroom in 2015.

Emily graduated from the University of Texas at Austin, followed by stints in New York City, Marfa, Tex., and Crescent City, Calif. She's always looking to hear from community members about newsworthy topics.

Donar Reiskoffer, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=465573

We have private schools and private prisons... how about private oceans?  The question is facetious, but only mildly so. 

Because commercial fishing in the United States is regulated through "catch shares" that allocate who can fish.  And those shares are privately held. 

We learn a whole lot more in a book by investigative journalist Lee van der Voo, The Fish Market

Wikimedia

Environmental laws and regulations exist for a reason; often, it's because some ecosystem, creatures, or people once suffered for the lack of protection. 

History is full of stories of products that crippled, maimed, and killed the people who made them.  So it was with Fake Silk, the title of a book by Paul David Blanc about cellulose viscose, used to make everything from car tires to kitchen sponges. 

Users generally suffered no ill effects, but the workers exposed to it did, and manufacturing processes released toxic chemicals into the air. 

Wikimedia

If someone once sang a song about water, there's a good chance Tim Holt knows of it. 

Holt is a folk singer who makes his way around the West Coast, often singing songs of rivers and oceans and the people who work on them. 

He performs his program again at the Medford Library on March 31st. 

At age 50, the Rogue Valley Symphony Orchestra is looking fairly fit. 

As it reaches a half-century, it reports a healthy growth in recent years, while maintaining a balanced budget. 

Music Director Martin Majkut (pronounced MY-koot) gets some of the credit.  He's led the orchestra since 2010, and into a period of artistic and monetary growth. 

The maestro has interesting stories to tell, both about RVSO and his own life journey as an immigrant. 

http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/obf_images/42/ea/021e3cc426d33baac73528f44039.jpgGallery: http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/V0045682.html, CC BY 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=36661881

The world wasn't created yesterday.  And over the years, human beings have learned a few things about how the body works and thrives. 

Some of the things learned are very old, including the ancient Indian healing wisdom of Ayurveda. 

Acharya Shunya is a practitioner, and offers up advice in her book Ayurveda Lifestyle Wisdom: A Complete Prescription to Optimize Your Health, Prevent Disease, and Live with Vitality and Joy

Southern Oregon University

The American approach to immigration changed with the departure of Barack Obama and the arrival of Donald Trump. 

And that is a concern for any and all organizations that work with and for immigrants, legal and not. 

Educational institutions in particular generally work to educate anyone who shows up. 

Rogue Community College and Southern Oregon University are both taking steps to adapt to the new landscape. 

SOU President Linda Schott visits with Marjorie Trueblood-Gamble, the director of diversity and inclusion at SOU. 

Wikimedia

Maybe the details take a while to sort through, but filing your taxes is a straightforward process: you fill out a return, and file it by April 15th. 

And if you need help and can afford it, you use a tax preparer.  All easier said than done for people in the marijuana business, because it's legal under state law and forbidden under federal law. 

Ben Yuma is the manager of Jefferson State Farms, in the marijuana business. 

Justin Botillier is managing partner of Rogue Tax Professionals

Konstantin Panphilov, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=36008858

Two organizations of similar focus and similar size, with similar approaches to management. 

One grows steadily, the other grows by leaps and bounds.  What is the difference? 

That is exactly what management guru Subir Chowdhury explores in his book The Difference: When Good Enough Isn't Enough

For one thing, a caring mindset that pervades an organization seems to help. 

Oobspace, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=47737380

Younger people--say 25 and under--probably can't remember a time without recycle bins next to the trash cans. 

The rest of us have had to get used to figuring out what goes in which bin.  The Earth is worth it, right? 

Over the years changes have come to recycling and our approach to it.  Rogue Disposal and Recycling in Medford rolls with the changes, as do Jackson County Master Recyclers

And the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality gets a piece of this puzzle as well. 

ncuaqmd.org

It can be fun to watch the kids get on the school bus in the morning.  Unless you're stuck behind an older bus spewing smelly smoke. 

Rural districts in particular tend to have the oldest, most polluting school buses. 

California's Rural School Bus Pilot Project aims to get many of those older buses off the road, and the North Coast Unified Air Quality Management District has been chosen to administer the project for the whole state. 

Gerald Schmitt/Wikimedia

Certain words in the English language come with an "ick factor" attached.  One of those is: cannibalism. 

It's just not something we like to think about, at least for our species: eating others of our own kind (except in zombie movies). 

But cannibalism is not unusual in nature, and may actually serve a purpose. 

Zoologist Bill Schutt explains in his book Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History.  He gives us the whole picture, from smaller organisms up to the Donner party. 

It's not like composers are all over the place, but we have a few we can call on from time to time.

One of them is Teddy Abrams, the music director for the Britt Orchestra Season

The concert season is still more than six months away, but it was announced recently. 

Air Force/Public Domain

It was just three weeks ago that the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists advanced the "Doomsday Clock" to two-and-a-half minutes to midnight, the highest threat of nuclear war perceived since the heart of the Cold War.

The Ploughshares Fund, which works to eliminate nuclear weapons, shares the concern of the scientists. 

Fund president Joseph Cirincione speaks in Eugene this weekend (Feb. 26) about nuclear policy in the age of Trump. 

John Duffy/Wikimedia

The White House proposed federal legislation on health care, and people took to the streets. 

A different White House proposed changes to health care legislation, and other people took to the streets. 

The practice of public demonstration is not lost, though it may be less common than in the 1960s.  L.A. Kauffman tracks the history of protest from the mid-20th century forward in his book Direct Action: Protest and the Reinvention of American Radicalism

It goes beyond history, into the current upsurge of activity on the streets. 

Fox Pictures

Movies about space flight always seem to be strong contenders for Best Picture at the Academy Awards. 

But a movie about math whizzes who made space flight possible?  That is the storyline of Hidden Figures, up for several Oscars on Sunday, February 26th. 

It is based on the true story of African American women whose calculation skills helped people fly into space, detailed in a book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly. 

She visited with us after the book was finished and as the movie neared completion. 

chery, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1282155

It looks really pretty on exterior walls--think universities and Wrigley Field--but English ivy is a pest. 

It is not a plant indigenous to our region, and ivy causes problems for native plants, including trees in the forest. 

It's a greater problem in the moister forests of the North Coast, where the No Ivy League has worked to eradicate it for several years. 

ICE/Public Domain

It's no surprise that the White House is cracking down on illegal immigration; President Trump promised to do so, and many Americans expect a crackdown. 

But Latino communities report a ripple effect: people who do want immigrants out have taken to demonstrating their feelings. 

Ben Garcia at Revista Caminos, a Spanish-language magazine, is working on a piece about the people who feel emboldened to haze immigrants and minorities. 

No matter the state of the economy or the political party in power, the arms industry continues to hum along. 

New and expensive weapons systems are built all the time, both for domestic use and for sale in foreign countries.  If there is a true debate going on, the arms makers are winning it. 

Paul Holden pulls together arguments from many writers against the arms industry in the book Indefensible: Seven Myths that Sustain the Global Arms Trade.

Oregon Blue Book

Oregon still requires the state legislature to draw new legislative and Congressional districts after every federal census. 

Which means the people in power get to pick the people they represent, up to a point.  It's a point too far for new Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson. 

He set up a nonpartisan Fair Redistricting Task Force to explore ways to change the process of drawing new lines. 

Three guests join us: Alan Zundel, who head the Pacific Green Party in Oregon, Rep. Julie Parrish, and former Secretary of State Phil Keisling. 

socompasshouse.org

Members of the Compass House tell us how recovery from mental illness isn't a myth.

Compass Radio is co-produced by Bryce Harding and the members of Compass House in Medford.

Compass House is a place for adults with mental illness to find support, in the clubhouse model of mental health care. 

Pages