April Ehrlich

Morning Edition Host/Jefferson Exchange Producer

April Ehrlich began freelancing for Jefferson Public Radio in the fall of 2016. She officially joined the team as Morning Edition Host and a Jefferson Exchange producer in August 2017.

April previously worked as a reporter. She has covered local government, housing, and environment in southern Oregon, eastern Oregon and western Idaho.

April served a two-year stint with AmeriCorps, where she worked with nonprofits helping low-income communities in rural Oregon. She earned a Bachelor’s Degree in English at Cal-State University, Fullerton, where she worked as an editor for the campus paper.

When she is not at work or napping between shifts, April is likely hiking through nearby forests with a rambunctious border collie, or reading fiction at home with her two favorite cats.
 

Larry Lamb, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=50842347

At its most basic level, fishing is trying to grab an animal out of water with a hook. 

But for the people who do it regularly, it's so much more.  Peace, quiet, accomplishment, fulfillment... it can be all that and more. 

For the organization Healing Waters, it's a way for disabled veterans to feel whole again. 

University of Washington Field Methods in Indigenous Archaeology

When we talk about "unearthing history," it's quite literal for archaeologists. 

And while the professionals supervise the work, there's room for amateurs to dig in the ground for clues to the lives of the people who preceded us. 

In this month's installment of "Underground History," our partners at the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology introduce us to the Oregon Archaeological Society

OAS provides volunteers for digs around the state, and provides those volunteers with training. 

nationalservice.gov

Oregon consistently shows up high on the list of states where people go hungry from time to time. 

And a new food insecurity report shows it remains above the national average.  But there is a glimmer of something positive in the news: some of the numbers show a decline in food insecurity. 

Partners for a Hunger-Free Oregon work to curb food insecurity, as does the food program at Access, Inc. in Jackson County. 

Wikimedia Commons

If it seems like just a few more birds are flying around of late, your powers of observation are acute. 

Plenty of birds are on the move this time of year, heading south for winter breeding and feeding grounds before frost settles in here. 

Klamath Bird Observatory will honor the semi-annual migration with a set of events on Saturday, September 23rd. 

They include a visit from Noah Strycker, world-class birder and record holder.  Noah, from Oregon, saw more than 6,000 bird species in a single year. 

www.inciweb.nwcg.gov

The heavy fire season of this summer is just the latest in what appears to be a growing trend. 

Even fires that are not terribly large or intense can have drastic consequences, large loss of life and property. 

Michael Kodas examines the trend in his book Megafire: The Race to Extinguish a Deadly Epidemic of Flame

inciweb.gov

Rain.  The word itself sounds pretty after a long stretch of hot weather and fires and smoke. 

And it began falling in the region over the weekend (September 17th), giving hope that the worst of the fires and smoky conditions might be behind us. 

That's not necessarily true, as fire managers remind us.  October can be a big fire month, too, and has been in several fire seasons. 

"Earth Seasoned" Facebook page

We can all stand to learn a few things from nature.  For a young woman named Tori, nature was her primary teacher for most of a year. 

Tori has been diagnosed with dyslexia, attention deficit disorder, and short-term memory problems. 

She and four other young women spent a year in the Oregon Cascades, living very close to the land. 

The story is told in the documentary film "Earth Seasoned," one of the films in this year's Jefferson State FlixxFest in the Scott Valley. 

Mary Anne Andrei

Running a farm is like running a factory, except you're not quite sure how much you'll produce until the season is over. 

That's just one of many challenges in agriculture, and there are many more, especially for smaller family farmers.  Agri-giant businesses have economies of scale that the small farms lack. 

But plenty of people are still dedicated to growing crops and a livelihood with them, just on a smaller scale. 

Ted Genoways follows a farm family in Nebraska in his took This Blessed Earth: A Year in the Life of an American Family Farm

Public Domain

More than half the population, yet still not equal in pay and other measures.  Women still have some gender biases to overcome. 

Those and many other issues are addressed at the Women With Wings conferences held across the country, including in Ashland next month (October 19-22). 

Di Strachan and Nancy Swift of Jefferson Economic Development Institute (JEDI) are among the speakers. 

Oregon Blue Book

Do you even know what your grandparents did for a living?  Bill Nicholson does, because he does it too. 

He is the third generation of his family to farm Nicholson Ranch in Fort Klamath.  And the ranch has just been recognized by the Oregon Farm Bureau's Century Farm & Ranch program, honoring places where people have worked the land for 100 years. 

There's even a Sesquicentennial Award for operations continuing for 150 years. 

Al Jazeera English-http://www.flickr.com/photos/aljazeeraenglish/8049728422/in/set-72157631653957819, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29515145

All eyes are on North Korea at the moment, thanks to its ongoing weapons tests. 

But Richard McGregor urges us to look elsewhere for the real story in Asia: the lingering and growing distrust and dislike between Japan and China. 

McGregor is a journalist who has covered Asia extensively, and he writes about the rising tensions in the region in Asia's Reckoning: China, Japan, and the Fate of U.S. Power in the Pacific Century

Ancient enmities and modern missteps, including in Washington, are examined in the book. 

Wikimedia

The Mount Shasta organization known as W.A.T.E.R. chose a name that stands for "We Advocate Thorough Environmental Review." 

And its members got their wish: an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) on the plan for Crystal Geyser's water bottling plant in Mount Shasta. 

The EIR is now out, sure to gladden some hearts and impact others adversely. 

Rick Bowmer/AP

40 filmed features and shorts are crammed into just three days at the Klamath Independent Film Festival, coming to Klamath Falls next weekend (Sept. 15-17). 

And they are all by or about people in Oregon and Northern California. 

The KIFF offerings include the Oregon premiere of "No Man's Land," a documentary about the armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in early 2016. 

Nicholas Blah/Flickr

What are you doing next week?  More important, how will you get to where you're doing it?  This is an important question for the last two weeks of September, the period of the Oregon Drive Less Challenge.

People all over the state are urged to walk, or bike, or take public transportation instead of driving. 

And there are incentives... prizes that can be earned through effective reductions in driving. 

Rogue Valley Transportation District (RVTD) and the City of Eugene are on board. 

News from around the world in an instant.  New movies for fall.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

Thomas Quine, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=51708455

Star Trek did it.  Superman did it.  Even Woody Allen traveled through time in one of his movies (bonus points for knowing which one).  In short, we've been talking about traveling through time for a very long time. 

James Gleick, who writes about science and its practitioners, travels back in time to the origins of people thinking and writing about time travel. 

It's all on the table, from Jules Verne to the present day, from art to science to philosophy, in Gleick's book Time Travel: A History

It includes an examination of what the author calls the porous boundary between science fiction and modern physics. 

Annette Teng, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=52465073

Vaux's swifts migrate through the west coast while on their way to Central and South America every summer.

In Western Oregon, they stop to roost in old hollow snags and chimneys every evening in September. People bring lawn chairs and picnic blankets to watch the spectacle of hundreds, sometimes thousands, of tiny black birds swirling around a chimney until diving in, all the while dodging preying hawks. 

But the trees and chimneys favored by the birds are getting harder to find these days, and the birds' numbers are dropping. 

Wikimedia

Even if you never drive past a vineyard, it's easy to spot evidence of a growing wine industry in Oregon. 

Just check out the "Oregon" racks in the wine section of the grocery store. 

The Southern Oregon University Research Center--SOURCE--recently completed a Wine & Vineyard Census, commissioned by the Oregon Wine Board.

Eva Skuratowicz and Rikki Pritzlaff are the researchers.

Tristan Loper, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=48424363

Dar Williams is one of a kind, so a little hard to categorize.  Sure, she is a singer and a songwriter, and highly regarded for her pop/folk work. 

But she's a writer, too, with a new book out called What I Found in A Thousand Towns.  It details the changes she sees in communities she has visited in years of touring. 

Evelyn Simak, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13063303

Trying to understand the world of legal marijuana in Oregon is enough to drive people to wine. 

Marijuana IS legal for personal as well as medical use (though still illegal under federal law), it can be grown, and it is regulated--sometimes heavily--by state and local authorities. 

We work through some of the issues with marijuana cultivation and production in a discussion with several people. 

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