Alice Mullaly

As It Was Contributor

Alice Mullaly was raised in the same Central Point home where she lives today with her husband, Larry. A graduate of Crater High School, Oregon State, and Stanford universities, she taught mathematics for 42 years in high schools in Nyack, New York.; Mill Valley, California, and at Hedrick Junior High School in Medford. She retired from Southern Oregon University where she trained new mathematics teachers. Mullaly’s husband was also a teacher as are her two daughters. Her husband is a Southern Pacific Railroad historian, and both of them enjoy hunting for “the story” in primary sources. Alice’s mother was an early member of the Southern Oregon Historical Society, and Alice has been an SOHS volunteer for nearly 30 years. She enjoys the puzzles people bring to the Research Library, the source of many of her “As It Was” stories.

The Women’s Christian Temperance Union supported many causes for the betterment of the lives of women in the decades before and after 1900. The Medford, Ore., chapter of the WCTU always campaigned for the prohibition of alcoholic beverages, but became especially active in the run up to the 1912 election that gave women the right to vote in Oregon.

An investigation of a photograph at the Southern Oregon Historical Society of John L. and Lily Demmer reveals a life’s story shared by many other Eastern European immigrants of their time.

On Oct. 4, 1937, A. R. Mansfield and his wife, Shirley, were working in the garden of their home in Butte Falls, Ore., while their two-year-old daughter, Shirley, was napping.  When a fire broke out in the cottage, flames at the door turned back Mrs. Mansfield, and her mother was unable to gain entrance through a window of the room where the daughter slept.

In 1910, The National Forest Ranger at Odessa, on Klamath Lake’s Pelican Bay, was W. F. Neff.  Most rangers were more isolated, but Neff had regular launch service and telephone lines. His wife was the postmaster and the area social organizer.

On New Year’s Day in 1882 in Jacksonville, Ore., 17-year-old Amalia “Molly” Britt received a special present from her older brother Emil.  It was an imposing cookbook with the long title “Common Sense in The Kitchen; Treatise on the Art of Cooking Every Variety of Food in Common Use in a Palatable and Digestible Manner at a Reasonable Cost.”

The U.S. Congress in 1984 approved designation of the Sky Lakes Wilderness Area high in the Southern Oregon Cascades.

During the U.S. Bicentennial Year of 1976, the founder of Pioneer Village in Jacksonville, Ore., George McUne, organized a Bicentennial Applegate Trail Wagon Train to recreate a piece of Western history.

When the musical titled “Dr. Doolittle” came out in 1967, few people realized how exceptional it was to include 1,200 trained animals in a single movie.  All the animals were supplied by Roy G. Kabat, whose Animal Actors Co. worked with exotic and domestic animals for movies and television and had a small traveling circus.

In the 1890’s, Charlie Gilmore and a partner had mined out a pocket of gold on Green Creek.  Gilbert used his earnings to build a hotel, store, and livery stable at what became known as Tigertown, Ore.

The University of Oregon Extension Division held a contest in 1925 for school children to write history essays about their communities for the monthly journal, The Extension Monitor.

The Long Tom Rebellion is sometimes considered the only Civil War battle fought in Oregon -- and it happened after the Civil War had ended.

When the Medford Corporation was railroad-logging out of Butte Falls, Ore., in the 1920’s, life for a logger’s family was not easy.

When the Oregon State Forestry Department needed a dispatcher during World War II, it hired Frances Port Clark.  She knew of the woods and the work of rangers and fire fighters from her father, a ranger for the Crater National Forest at its station in Applegate.

John S. Love, his two brothers and their widowed mother started out with other friends from Pennsylvania to Oregon in April 1853.

If there is such a thing as foxhole humor, this story records one lonely soldier’s attempt to cheer up his grandmother, Mrs. Albert Allen in Central Point, Ore., who was concerned about keeping up the soldier’s morale.

In 1893, before there were National Forests to manage public lands, homesteaders could claim timberland.  Near Spikenard, Ore., along East Evans Creek, two men coveted the same piece of property.

Althouse Creek in Josephine County was one of the earliest gold mining regions in Southern Oregon.  Mining continued there well into the 20th century. Today’s story is about one of the miners of 1922.

Saloons, card rooms and rowdy folks gave Medford, Oregon’s Front Street a poor reputation in 1911. Fights were common, but guns were rarely used.  When a “deafening report rang out” on the night of June 8, the saloons emptied, windows and doors opened and a crowd gathered to see who had been shot.

Mabel Ramsey wrote this poem about her mother, Amy Dysert, an early pioneer of the mining town of Golden, Ore.

Living in rural Josephine County in the 1920’s meant not having electricity, refrigerators or ice in the summer.  So the Walters family developed a Fourth of July tradition of ordering a 100-pound block of ice and bottled sodas from the ice plant in Grants Pass.

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