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Obama's Fish Tale: Spawned On By A Salmon

23 hours ago

It was supposed to be a routine photo op.

Imagine a space shuttle speeding toward Earth at 17,500 miles per hour, the friction outside heating the vessel up to more than 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit as it enters the atmosphere.

The 'Indian Cowboys' Of Florida

Sep 3, 2015

Florida Cowboys Week: Part Two

The state of Florida has a rich and diverse tradition of cattle ranching. Recently we explored the black cowboys of Florida. There are other distinctive elements to the state's past as well.

"Indian cowboys," for instance.

A former aide to Hillary Clinton said he will invoke his Fifth Amendment right to remain silent and not answer questions from Congress.

The aide, Bryan Pagliano, helped set up Clinton's private email server. Clinton has faced months of scrutiny for using her home server and a private email address to conduct State Department business.

The Select Committee on Benghazi had asked Pagliano, a former State Department employee, to field questions next week. His lawyer has declined, sending a letter to Congress citing the negative political environment.

Updated at 3:35 p.m. ET

Thousands of migrants flooded into a train station in the Hungarian capital Thursday after police lifted a two-day blockade, but some who boarded a train they thought was going to Germany ended up instead at a refugee camp just miles from Budapest.

That Little Syrian Boy: Here's Who He Was

Sep 3, 2015

Editor's Note: The photos in this story may be distressing to some viewers. The original version has been updated to include additional details.

The numbers associated with today's migration crisis are huge: 4 million Syrians fleeing their country; 3 million Iraqis displaced. But it was the image of a solitary child — a toddler in a red T-shirt, blue shorts and Velcro sneakers, found face-down on a Turkish beach — that shocked and haunted the world this week.

A federal judge has thrown out Tom Brady's four-game suspension over his role in "deflategate."

The suspension was handed down by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell after attorney Ted Wells found that employees of the New England Patriots deflated footballs to make them easier to grip. Goodell said Brady likely knew about the scheme.

Brady appealed Goodell's decision in federal court, and today, he prevailed.

The "Deflategate" scandal that's consumed NFL fans for months is hardly the first high-profile case of sports cheating.

The allegations landed Super Bowl-winning quarterback Tom Brady a four-game suspension, which a federal judge threw out on Sept. 3. But it's really nothing new.

Courtesy of Karla Hernandez-Mats

For years, many have identified Miami with its signficant Cuban population. And while Cuban Americans make up 54 percent of Miami's Hispanic population, it doesn't tell the whole story.

REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger

A train station in Hungary is the latest place where the migrant crisis is playing out.

Hungarian officials have closed the Keleti station to stop migrants from continuing their journey in Europe. Many started their journey in Greece or Italy and want to get to Germany.

But for now, the trains aren't going anywhere.

SHT Show

What do you get when you combine poster designers from Seattle, Havana and Tehran?

A SHT Show of course.

Seattle-based curator and designer Daniel Smith first came up with the idea for a Seattle–Havana–Tehran Poster Design Show 10 years ago when he visited Cuba on a cultural exchange.

Trouble Sleeping? A Composer Wants To Help

Sep 3, 2015

British composer Max Richter spent about two years writing and recording a piece of music which, if it's successful, few people will hear in full. It's a composition called Sleep and it runs eight hours long — the perfect length for a good night's rest. The full version of the piece will be released as a digital album Friday.

China today sent mixed signals about its military and strategic aims — at once parading tanks, missiles and precision-drilled soldiers through the streets of Beijing even as President Xi Jinping announced there would be 300,000 fewer troops by 2018.

Rebecca Collard

When Khodar Jindo and his family fled Syria, like many other refugees, they had their sights set on northern Europe. After nine months in Turkey, they decide to make their journey.

They paid a smuggler thousands of dollars. He said he would take them all the way to Germany, but somewhere in the remote forests near the Turkish-Bulgarian border he abandoned them.

“Without the GPS, we would have died in Bulgaria,” say Kohdar.

Khodar and his family were stranded with a group of other migrants.

Updated at 1:39 p.m. ET

A federal judge found a Kentucky clerk at the center of the national debate over same-sex marriage in contempt of court after she defied the Supreme Court by refusing to issue marriage licenses in protest of such marriages.

Kentucky Public Radio's Ryland Barton reports that District Judge David L. Bunning ordered Kim Davis taken into custody by federal marshals "until she complies" with a court order.

Murad Sezer/Reuters

“The vagina is cleaner than your mouth,” declared Sharon Hillier, addressing a group of journalists at the HIV Research for Prevention conference in Cape Town last fall. The audience squirmed, gasped and giggled.

The professor of obstetrics-gynecology and reproductive services at the University of Pittsburgh is known for her unabashed statements: She introduces herself as a vaginal ecologist and calls the vagina a “beautiful ecosystem.”

Kim Kyung-Hoon

In today's world of 24/7 connectivity, it comes as no surprise to hear that our tech habits may be hurting our relationships.

Only a tiny fraction of the growing number of people with health savings accounts invests the money in their accounts in the financial markets, a recent study finds. The vast majority leave their contributions in savings accounts instead where the money may earn lower returns.

Amid a corruption scandal that has been punctuated by daily protests in the country, Guatemala's President Otto Pérez Molina resigned and, hours later, was sent to jail to await the conclusion of a court hearing.

In a letter presented to Congress at 11:58 p.m. on Wednesday, Pérez Molina said he was resigning "in the interest of the country."

Now that 34 senators have committed to support President Obama on the Iran nuclear agreement, that deal looks certain to survive the opposition of Republicans in Congress.

But Congress still faces an ugly September and fall, as other crises await members returning from five weeks of vacation, namely:

  • A potential government shutdown
  • Once again hitting the debt ceiling
  • The highway fund running out of money
  • A lapse in authority for the Export-Import Bank

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