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Climate Change Suit Gets Second Hearling
3:47 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Oregon Appeals Court Sends Climate Suit Back to Lane County Judge

Judges on Oregon's Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday that two Eugene teens have a right to hear their case on climate change heard in court.
Oregon Judicial Department

A lawsuit brought by two Eugene teens against the state over climate change will get a second hearing in Lane County Circuit Court. The Oregon Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday the case has merit.

Attorneys for Kelsey Juliana and Olivia Chernaik argue that the Public Trust Doctrine requires the state to do more to curtail climate change. Lane County Circuit Judge Karsten Rasmussen dismissed it nearly 2 years ago, saying his court didn’t have jurisdiction to resolve the question.

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The Two-Way
3:07 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Emirates Nixes Order For 70 Airbus A350s

The Airbus A350-900 flies in the aerial display on the first day of the Singapore Air Show in February. Dubai-based Emirates Airlines announced Wednesday it was canceling an order for 70 of the planes.
Joseph Nair AP

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:30 pm

Emirates Airlines has backed out of a deal it signed seven years ago to buy 70 Airbus A350s, a major blow to the European plane-maker that could prove a windfall for Chicago-based Boeing.

The canceled order for 50 A350-900s and 20 of the larger A350-1000s, to be delivered in 2019, had been worth $16 billion at the time the deal was inked in 2007.

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NPR Story
3:02 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Under New EPA Rules, Washington To Face Deepest Mandatory Cuts In CO2 Emissions

Washington has one of the lowest CO2 emissions levels from electricity generation in the country, since it's home to only one coal-burning power plant. Under new EPA rules, Washington is on the hook to cut those emissions by more than any other state.
Michael Werner

SEATTLE -- Under the new rules released by the federal Environmental Protection Agency, each state has a specific percentage by which it has to cut its carbon dioxide emissions by 2030.

The average of all the individual state-level cuts will be CO2 emissions from power plants 30 percent below 2005 levels.

"It’s a goal that we can, should and will meet, in part because we’ve already taken early action in our state," Washington Gov. Jay Inslee told EarthFix.

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Around the Nation
2:40 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Orlando Steps Up To Make Its Streets More Pedestrian-Friendly

Florida is home to the country's four most dangerous large metro areas for pedestrians, according to a new national study. Orlando tops the list, followed by Tampa, Jacksonville and Miami, pictured above.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:39 pm

Semoran Boulevard in Orlando, lined with gas stations, strip malls and bus stops, is a good example of what's wrong with the roads in this busy Florida city.

It's the most dangerous street in a city that ranks No. 1 in the nation for pedestrian accidents, according to a recent national study. There have been 28 crashes involving pedestrians — and six deaths — on this stretch of road over the past seven years.

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National Security
2:16 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Defending Bergdahl Deal, Hagel Faces Critics On Both Sides Of Aisle

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:24 pm

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel testified before the House Armed Services Committee on Wednesday, defending the prisoner swap that freed Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

Politics
2:10 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

In A Rare Act Of Bipartisan Speed, Senate Passes VA Reforms

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:24 pm

The Senate has passed a bill to reform the Department of Veterans Affairs. Like a similar bill in the House, the Senate bill gives veterans the option of seeking private care if the VA takes too long and makes it easier to fire VA employees. But the Senate version also spends a lot more money on doctors and hospitals than the House version.

Media
2:04 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

To Defeat A Goliath, David Brat Got Help In Conservative Media

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:24 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In trying to reconstruct how Congressman Cantor was defeated, another partial explanation surfaced in the media. Perhaps, it was the media. Here's NPR's media correspondent, David Folkenflik.

DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: David Brat had a pretty clear idea of at least one of the keys to his victory. He identified it this morning on "The Laura Ingraham Show."

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO SHOW, "THE LAURA INGRAHAM SHOW")

LAURA INGRAHAM: Hey Dave, how are you?

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NPR Ed
2:04 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

A High School Band Where Everyone's Voice Can Be Heard

Adam Goldberg, the creator of the PS 177 band, conducting at band practice.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:53 pm

(This is Part 2 of a two-part report. Read the full piece here.)

On the surface, the PS 177 Technology Band looks like a typical high school orchestra. But there are two big differences. First, while they use traditional instruments, they also play iPads. And all of the band members have disabilities. Some have autism spectrum disorders.

"I'm Tobi Lakes. I'm 15 years old. I'm in ninth grade. I'm four grades away from college."

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Economy
2:04 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

A Campaign To House The Homeless Reaches A Milestone

Mallyveen Teah relaxes in his Arlington, Va., apartment after work.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:24 pm

Mallyveen Teah, 53, has been homeless or couch surfing on and off for the past 25 years. Now, he walks from his job at a construction site in Arlington, Va., to his new home, a one-bedroom apartment.

"Something as simple as giving a person a set of keys to their own place makes a huge difference in terms of their outlook on life, the world," he says.

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U.S.
2:04 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

At The Head Of Her Class, And Homeless

Rashema Melson lives in the D.C. General homeless shelter with her mother and two brothers. "Because you live in a shelter — that's not who you are, that's just where you reside at for the moment," she says.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:24 pm

On Wednesday, Rashema Melson will graduate at the top of her class as the valedictorian of Anacostia High School in Washington, D.C. She's headed to Georgetown University this fall on a full scholarship.

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