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Oregon Pot Sales Higher Than Colorado And Washington

7 hours ago

Oregon's recreational marijuana sales were higher than Colorado and Washington during their first week of sales. Pot stores sold more than 11 million dollars worth of the drug. That's according to the non-profit trade group "Oregon Retailers of Cannabis Association." ORCA Executive Director Casey Houlihan says there were multiple factors contributing to the State's higher sales.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Agriculture announced this year's Specialty Crop Block Grant Programs Funds.

In Oregon, nearly $2 million will fund 24 projects to help boost the competitiveness of the state's crops. Mainly fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, nursery crops and other specialty crops.

ODA Director Katy Coba said, "Over the years, these federal funds have provided much needed assistance to Oregon's specialty crop producers and produced some terrific projects that have made a difference."

Remembering The Lives Of The Roseburg 9

7 hours ago

The nine victims who died in the Umpqua Community College mass shooting on Oct. 1, were an eclectic mix of talented students, parents and lovers of life.

Here, we celebrate the lives of the Roseburg nine.

Lucero Alcarez, 19, Roseburg

Obama Meets With Families Of Victims Of UCC Shooting

7 hours ago

President Obama arrived at the Eugene airport today to speak with local officials before heading to Roseburg to meet with families of the victims of the shooting at Umpqua Community College.

Last week, nine people were killed when a lone gunman opened fire inside a classroom at the rural Oregon community college.

The attack shattered the first week of classes at UCC in the small timber town, about 180 miles south of Portland.

The president did not speak to the press, but he did speak to Senator Ron Wyden during the plane ride.

Updated -- Officials with the Grant County Public Utility District say an electrical equipment failure is to blame for an explosion at Priest Rapids Dam Thursday that injured six workers, two critically.

Updated -- Protesters and supporters greeted President Barack Obama during his visit to Roseburg, Oregon. The President touched down in Marine One Friday afternoon to meet with families of the victims of last week's shooting at Umpqua Community College.

Here we go: some international soccer news that doesn't involve FIFA President Sepp Blatter.

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And we're going to hear now from one of the other leaders of Tunisia's National Dialogue Quartet. Her name is Wided Bouchamaoui. She's president of the Tunisian employers union, and she joins us from Tunis.

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We're going to turn now to Thanassis Cambanis. He has just returned from Syria. He was reporting for Foreign Policy magazine, and we reached him in Beirut. And Thanassis Cambanis, welcome to the program.

Over the summer, the Texas Forensic Science Commission, which sets standards for physical evidence in state courts, came to an unsettling conclusion: There was something wrong with how state labs were analyzing DNA evidence.

It seemed the labs were using an outdated protocol for calculating the probability of DNA matches in "mixtures"; that is, crime scene samples that contain genetic material from several people. It may have affected thousands of cases going back to 1999.

A Scottish nurse who recovered from Ebola in January has been medevaced from Glasgow to London in a Royal Air Force C-130 Hercules transport plane specially equipped for infection control.

Doctors say Pauline Cafferkey is suffering "an unusual late complication" from her previous Ebola infection. They note that "Pauline previously had the Ebola virus and this is therefore not a new infection."

4 Ways This Whole Republican Speaker Situation Gets Resolved

10 hours ago

Chaos ensued in the halls of Congress Thursday when Rep. Kevin McCarthy unexpectedly took himself out of the running to replace John Boehner as speaker of the House.

The reason for the pandemonium and, yes, even tears: No one knows where this goes from here.

Here are the four likely ways it gets resolved:

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After a career working on Mideast policy in several administrations and many years trying to mediate a Middle East peace, Dennis Ross has written a book about U.S.-Israeli relations, and he joins us now. Welcome to the program.

Mexico says that it will allow a team of international experts to revisit the case of 43 students who went missing last year.

NPR's Carrie Kahn reports that the United Nations' top human rights official recommended the move after a visit to the country.

Carrie filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, the U.N.'s High Commissioner on Human Rights, recommended the experts re-examine the site where the government says the bodies of the students were burned.

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#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. On Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you three items.

From Sam Sanders, a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk:

On Thursday, Volkswagen’s U.S. executive Michael Horn apologized before a congressional committee for the deception over software that evades emissions tests. The automaker is mired in an emissions cheating scandal that affects half a million cars in the U.S. and 11 million around the world.

There’s also news today that federal and California regulators are investigating a second computer program in Volkswagen diesel cars that also impacts emissions controls. Mike Regan of Bloomberg News joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

It sounds like a storyline out of Hollywood. A group of convicted inmates from the Eastern New York Correctional Facility, all of them participants in Bard College’s Prison Initiative, challenge Harvard University’s national championship-winning debate team. The inmates, who research without the Internet (because it’s not allowed), and wait weeks for the books they need to be cleared by security, win.

For the first time in more than a decade, there’s a new treatment for patients diagnosed with one of the most common and deadly forms of brain cancer, known as glioblastoma or GBM. More than 12,000 Americans are diagnosed annually and until now, the median life expectancy after diagnosis was about 15 months.

Unlike traditional treatments, which include chemotherapy and radiation, this new treatment is non-invasive, doesn’t involve drugs and has few side effects. In fact, it looks a lot like an old-fashioned bathing cap hooked up to a backpack.