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Most parents have experienced sticker shock when they find out just how much it will cost to care for their infant or toddler full- or even part-time. For parents who have little choice, this can be a big financial strain.

In fact, the most common challenge parents face when looking for child care is the high cost. That's the finding of a recent poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health.

Sounds, particularly those made by other humans, rank as the No. 1 distraction in the workplace. According to workplace design expert Alan Hedge at Cornell, 74 percent of workers say they face "many" instances of disturbances and distractions from noise.

"In general, if it's coming from another person, it's much more disturbing than when it's coming from a machine," he says, because, as social beings, humans are attuned to man-made sounds. He says overheard conversations, as well as high-pitched and intermittent noises, also draw attention away from tasks at hand.

After a bruising career in the rough and tumble NHL, who could blame a guy for wanting to take it easy? At age 55, Wayne Gretzky is still playing charity games with other old timers, but "I'm getting older and slower," he says with a laugh.

Cigarettes Flickr 20160420 P
Luciano Belviso / Flickr

Luciano Belviso / Flickr

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

Chris Maletis is driving his SUV along Highway 551 between Aurora and Wilsonville at the southern end of Clackamas County. It takes a few minutes to drive around the 385 acres Maletis owns here with his brother Tom.

“We’re coming right up on the airport, which employs hundreds of people,” said Maletis, who contends this area is urban in nature.

The property includes the Langdon Farms Golf Club. But Maletis sees his land as helping address the region's — and especially Clackamas County's — shortfall of industrial property.

Oregon State University has created a safety panel to oversee the construction of its new marine research center being built in the tsunami zone.

But it’s made up of academics—not engineers.

OSU President Ed Ray said the panel will make sure the building’s engineering meets earthquake and tsunami commitments.

U.S. District Court Judge Anna Brown said, for now, she won't dismiss a juror in the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupation trial, after that person was accused by another juror of being biased.

A juror in the trial of Ammon Bundy and six others sent a note to the judge Tuesday, accusing another juror of being biased because he used to work for the Bureau of Land Management.

No matter where you live in Oregon, all you need is a single first-class stamp if you want to return your ballot by mail. Oregon Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins said ballots in all 36 counties are small enough that just one "Forever" stamp is all it takes.

With gun control efforts stalled in Congress and in many statehouses, advocates are forging another path forward: They're going straight to the ballot box.

Voters in four states will weigh gun control initiatives Nov. 8 ballot: Maine, Nevada, Washington and California. In Nevada and Maine, voters are being asked whether to strengthen background check requirements for gun sales. Washington State voters already did that; now they're considering whether to allow a court to take guns away from potentially dangerous people.

For years, the United Nations has refused to publicly acknowledge that its troops were the source of a massive cholera outbreak in Haiti in the wake of the 2010 earthquake.

But now the U.N. is accepting "moral responsibility" for the outbreak that has sickened nearly 800,000 people and killed more than 9,000 others.

Carolyn Beeler/PRI

This is what Um-E Salma remembers about her wedding day.

“Before I started to dress up I closed my room and I cried a lot, and I told myself that this is all you are going to cry for the rest of your life.”

The groom was 26. Salma was 17.

She was transformed from an over-achieving tenth-grader into a bride terrified of what would happen on her wedding night.  

“I was not educated about the subject even,” Salma said. “I was really scared of him coming in the room so I went to the washroom and I locked myself up.”

Journalism in Mosul right now is punishable by death

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Reuters/via Amaq news agency 

Citizen journalists inside Mosul say the government there, imposed by ISIS, is starting to break down. An offensive to drive the terror group out of the Iraqi city has been ongoing for 10 days.

But — who are these citizen journalists?

When you're facing a major life change, it helps to talk to someone who's already been through it. All Things Considered is connecting people on either side of a shared experience, and they're letting us eavesdrop on their conversations in our series Been There.

Liv Aannestad has known she wanted kids as long as she can remember.

The New York Giants have released kicker Josh Brown over his admitted abuse of his then-wife, in a case that has previously raised questions about the NFL's willingness to punish players who commit acts of domestic violence.

"We believed we did the right thing at every juncture in our relationship with Josh," team President John Mara said in a statement. "Our beliefs, our judgments and our decisions were misguided. We accept that responsibility."

Attackers kill dozens of sleeping cadets at Pakistani police academy in Quetta

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Akhtar Soomro/Reuters

Suspected Islamic militants attacked a police academy overnight in the Pakistani city of Quetta, killing at least 61 and wounding more than 100. Most of the victims were cadets.

“Three suicide bombers went in, all wearing suicide vests, and they opened fire,” says Kathy Gannon, an Associated Press special regional correspondent for Afghanistan and Pakistan. “There was a gun battle lasting four hours. One of them detonated his vest when the army arrived. A second one went to detonate his vest but before he could, he was shot. The third one was also shot.”

Along the border between the U.S. and Mexico, armed groups on patrol — mostly men — look for illegal immigrants and drug traffickers. They're not U.S. Border Patrol, but regular people who've decided to take matters into their own hands.

They call themselves militias. Groups such as these have been around for decades, but they exploded in number after Barack Obama was elected president. Today, there are 276 militia groups around the country, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Researchers have launched an innovative medical experiment that's designed to provide quick answers while meeting the needs of patients, rather than drug companies.

Traditional studies can cost hundreds of millions of dollars, and can take many years. But patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease don't have the time to wait. This progressive muscle-wasting disease is usually fatal within a few years.

We've Seen This Election Before, In Classic Movies

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We keep hearing that this election is like no other, but when I watch old movies, I often hear echoes of what's going on in the campaign.

The guy who opines in A Face in the Crowd (1957), say, that in the then-new age of television, "instead of long-winded public debates, people want capsule slogans."

In a cavernous, dimly-lit auditorium in Washington last month, three officials took the stage.

They settled themselves into tan, leather armchairs and fielded questions, including this one: Name a global flashpoint you're looking to with concern?

"North Korea," came the reply from one. "And how the United States and China deal with that situation."

The exchange is worth noting because the three people on stage were current or former CIA officials.