Geoffrey Riley

News Director | Jefferson Exchange Host

Geoffrey Riley began practicing journalism in the State of Jefferson more than three decades ago, as a reporter and anchor for a Medford TV station. It was about the same time that he began listening to Jefferson Public Radio, and thought he might one day work there. He was right.

Geoff came to JPR as a backup host on The Jefferson Exchange in late 2000, and he assumed the full-time host job at the beginning of 2010. The two hours of the Exchange allow him to join our listeners in exploring issues both large and small, local and global. In addition to hosting The Exchange, Geoff oversees JPR’s news department as its News Director.

Geoff is a New York native, with stints in broadcast news in Missouri, Alabama, and Wisconsin before his arrival in Oregon. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

Susan Langston

Last year in Hollywood (hint: Harvey Weinstein) reminded us that some people do not seek our permission before doing things to us or on us. 

The reminder spurred further discussion of the need for a "consent culture" in the country.  And it goes way beyond interpersonal and sexual relationships. 

The myriad ways society could approach HOW we approach each other are contained in a new anthology called Ask: Building Consent Culture

Kitty Stryker is the editor. 


Following the news closely is stressful. Something traumatic seems to happen every day; if not at home, then abroad.

Can we adjust our news diets to stay both informed and, well, sane?

Longtime journalist Peter Laufer, of Eugene, authored Slow News: A Manifesto for the Critical News Consumer in 2014.


We do love our motor vehicles in America.  And in a region like ours, far-flung and thinly populated, we often can't live without 'em. 

So it's plenty stressful when our cars and trucks begin to act up or act strangely. 

Zach Edwards has seen plenty of strange vehicle behavior in his years working on cars and owning Ashland Automotive

He visits once a month to take listeners calls and emails on automotive issues, in a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel.  This month, we focus on the differences between four-wheel drive and all-wheel drive. 


Oregon's foster care system for children needs a lot of work, there's general agreement on that.  A lawsuit against the state revealed issues caused by shortages of parents and caseworkers, like children being kept in motels instead of private homes. 

An audit by the secretary of state revealed these and other issues.  So what will it take to patch the holes, and can enough foster parents be found to ensure that all children entering care are welcomed into safe environments? 

Randall Theatre Company

Is it March already?  Oh yeah, February is a very short month.  Which just means we get to celebrate the arts once again in our First Friday Arts Segment, just four weeks after the last time. 

We offer a series of chats on arts events coming to towns around the region, but it's all audience-driven: the phone calls make the segment. 

Call 800-838-3760 to be one of the participants; tell the audience about an event in the performing or visual arts coming soon. 


Any choral group can fill a concert, or a series of them, with works by the old masters. 

But there are new masters, too, and Southern Oregon Repertory Singers intend to showcase them in "First Light: The James M. Collier New Works Festival," this weekend in Ashland. 

SORS musical director Paul French gathered choral works new and nearly-new for the concerts. 

Christian Ferrer, CC BY-SA 4.0,

The world is a horrible place, and it could end soon.  A few people might believe that now, and it would be FAR from the first time in American history. 

For more than a century, charismatic preachers railed against sin and Satan, stirring up their followers to look beyond now and here, to the ends times and heaven.  Billy Graham, who died last week, was one of them. 

Matthew Avery Sutton tells the story of Graham and many others in American Apocalypse: A History of Modern Evangelicalism

The early years of gray wolves returning to the region are proving to be interesting, to say the least.  Wolf packs are now established west of the Cascades in both Oregon and California

In fact, not long after Oregon wildlife biologists got a radio collar on female wolf OR-54 of the Rogue Pack, she left for California and stayed there for a while.  She's since returned. 

We gather workers from Fish & Wildlife in both states for some updates on wolf management and its many challenges. 

Fronteiras do Pensamento/Wikimedia

The "fake news" avalanche of our time may have surprised a lot of people.  But not the people who understand networks and how they work. 

Niall Ferguson is both historian and journalist, and he thinks the people who build networks--particularly today's social media networks--could stand to understand history a little better. 

Ferguson gives the lesson himself in his latest book The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook.  He points out how networks have repeatedly posed challenges to established hierarchies throughout history. 

NASA/Public Domain

Ashlander Michael Niemann's knowledge of the world helps him in multiple ways. 

He teaches world politics and human rights among other international subjects at Southern Oregon University. 

And he writes novels set in other countries. 

Those include a recent release, the thriller Illegal Holdings, which features the exploits of Niemann's recurring character, Valentin Vermeulin.  Spies and foreign cultures are characters in the book. 


We have yet to find a musical genre that Josh Gross does not like. 

His enthusiasm for music in all forms is infectious, and reflected in his music columns and articles in the Rogue Valley Messenger

So we borrow that enthusiasm once a month, for our own Rogue Sounds segment.  Josh Gross returns to talk about the works and local appearances of a handful of bands. 

Bureau of Land Management

2018 figures to be a big year for the Klamath River Renewal Corporation

KRRC is the new entity set up to take ownership of the four hydro dams on the Klamath River slated for removal. 

Most of the staff will be hired by this year, and the process of hiring companies and people to do the dam removal work is also scheduled.  Dam demolition will start in two years, on the current timeline. 

Dave Meurer, as community liaison for the KRRC, has the task of keeping the public up to speed on the massive project. 

Film Shasta

Who needs Hollywood when you've got Redding and environs? 

Film Shasta is set up to encourage filmmakers to shoot their projects in Shasta County.  And it appears to be working... 2017 was a record year for film work in the county, with an estimated $650,000 or more in economic impact on the region. 

Sabrina Jurisich is the Shasta County Film Commissioner. 


Brad Meltzer is a busy guy.  He continues to crank out mystery novels, often with historical and/or political themes, and he hosts "Lost History" on History network. 

And his work is not just for grownups; Meltzer is also the author of a series of books for kids, Ordinary People Change the World

Harriet Tubman, Gandhi, and Jackie Robinson are among the people profiled in the series for young readers. 


Ten million people live in Los Angeles County, the biggest in California.  Humboldt County has somewhat fewer, at a bit more than 134,000. 

So Humboldt and 34 other counties band together to bring their concerns to the attention of state legislators, as the Rural County Representatives of California, RCRC. 

And Humboldt County has the potential for a bit more attention, now that County Supervisor Rex Bohn chairs RCRC. 

Google Street View

Eight new housing units for veterans are in the works for Klamath Falls, thanks to a grant from the Oregon Department of Housing and Community Services. 

$2 Million will buy and renovate a building on East Main Street, give veterans places to live, and NOT require a money match from the Klamath Housing Authority or Klamath & Lake Community Action Services

Housing for vets is an ongoing issue in Klamath Falls and many towns in the region. 

Bruce Haynes is used to studying people and urban communities in particular; he's a sociologist at the University of California-Davis.  But his latest book, with Syma Solovitch, turns the lens around, to focus on three generations of his own family, in Harlem. 

The book is called Down the Up Staircase: Three Generations of a Harlem Family, and it traces the rising and falling fates of the family and its community. 

This is the latest edition of The Keenest Observers.  Host Rob Goodwin returns to interview Bruce Haynes. 


It can be a little jarring to visit the Oregon Dunes a while after your last trip... things move around. And they're supposed to, in a healthy dune ecosystem.

The winds blow the sand around into new shapes and positions.

Unless someone planted vegetation to “stabilize” the dunes, and that has happened.

The invasive plant species gorse is now a major concern, and the focus of the Oregon Dunes Restoration Collaborative.

Molly J. Smith/Statesman Journal

People are dying in Northern California at alarming rates. 

Drug and alcohol abuse are among the causes of death that are killing white people at rates above the national average. 

The Center on Society and Health at Virginia Commonwealth University and the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Pittsburgh assembled a report that shows high rates of increased mortality across most of the counties of the Northstate. 


More than a few baby boomers can probably remember statements in their youth like "you can't tell the boys from the girls anymore." 

And a young person today might well answer: so what?  Gender HAS been a factor in determining many rights and responsibilities through human history, and seldom for good. 

Gender roles and even identities are more fluid now; sociologist Barbara Risman examines the situation in Where the Millennials Will Take Us: A New Generation Wrestles with the Gender Structure