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As President Trump approaches the one-year anniversary of his inauguration, a majority of Americans think his first year in office has been a failure — and that he's divided the nation.

A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds that by a 53-to-40-percent margin, Americans deemed Trump's first year a failure. And by an almost 2-to-1 margin (61 to 32 percent), Americans said they believe Trump has divided the country since his election.

Lawmakers Testify At Hearing: Bring Earmarks Back

7 hours ago

Like many lawmakers, Rep. Alcee Hastings, D-Fla., supports reviving earmarks, but he mused at a House Rules Committee hearing Wednesday that the debate is futile if House Speaker Paul Ryan does not.

"When the speaker ain't inclined, ain't much going to happen," Hastings quipped, noting the speaker reiterated as recently as last Friday that he opposes ending an earmark ban put in place by former House Speaker John Boehner.

Updated at 7:45 a.m. ET

The House Intelligence Committee is set to decide on Thursday whether to release the transcript of its meeting with the man who commissioned the infamous Trump-Russia dossier.

Lawmakers have scheduled a closed meeting at which they'll vote about whether to unveil the text of hours' worth of testimony by Glenn Simpson, founder of the private intelligence firm Fusion GPS.

A former Department of Energy photographer has filed a federal whistleblower suit alleging he lost his job after leaking photos of a private meeting between Energy Secretary Rick Perry and a major Trump donor who heads one of the country's largest mining companies.

The photographer, Simon Edelman, took photos of the March 29, 2017, meeting between Perry and Robert "Bob" Murray, the CEO of Ohio-based Murray Energy, who gave $300,000 to the Trump campaign.

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Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

The battle between the Trump administration and California over the Golden State’s new “sanctuary state” law appears to be heating up.

A former National Superintendent of the Year has been forced out of the top post in a school district south of Eugene.

Krista Parent is retiring after 16 years as superintendent and more than 30 years at the South Lane School District. The American Association of School Administrators named Parent superintendent of the year in 2007.

The South Lane school board announced Parent’s retirement Tuesday night after a closed session on personnel matters.

Cannabis trade associations in Oregon, Washington and California are banding together to “protect West Coast cannabis interests.”

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

Democratic candidate for governor Delaine Eastin wants to reduce California’s high poverty and incarceration by investing more in students.

Since last May, thousands of Haitian immigrants have been steadily pouring into Canada, mostly on foot at the Quebec border, in an attempt to flee aggressive anti-immigration policies by the Trump administration.

Black Holes: Where Reality Beats Fiction

16 hours ago

Last week, the PBS series Nova presented an episode on black holes, these most mysterious and mind-boggling physical objects.

Updated at 8:06 a.m. ET, Jan. 18

Congressional leaders plan to vote later this week on a month-long spending bill but the ongoing fight over immigration threatens to derail the plan days before the Friday deadline to prevent a government shutdown.

Republican leaders say they are confident that Congress will vote this week to extend current spending levels until February 16 but Democrats and some far-right conservatives are threatening to block the legislation.

The federal government's top fisheries experts say that three widely used pesticides — including the controversial insecticide chlorpyrifos — are jeopardizing the survival of many species of salmon, as well as orcas that feed on those salmon.

It's a fresh attack on a chemical that the Environmental Protection Agency was ready to take off the market a year ago — until the Trump administration changed course.

With the death of biologist Mathilde Krim on Monday, at the age of 91 at her home in New York, the world lost a pioneering scientist, activist and fundraiser in AIDS research. She is being widely praised this week for her clarity, compassion and leadership.

Amid the panic, confusion and discrimination of the HIV epidemic's earliest days, Krim stood out — using science and straight talk, in the 1980s and beyond, to dispel fear, stigma, and misinformation among politicians and the public.

Trump Eases Rules For Bird-Killing Wind Turbines, Power Lines

19 hours ago

Lynn Tompkins peers down at a red-tailed hawk laid across a small exam table at Blue Mountain Wildlife’s clinic in Pendleton, Oregon.

It’s out cold.

“She was in very good shape until she got zapped,” Tompkins says as she removes the bandage on the hawk’s left wing, revealing a raw wound.

The bird was electrocuted a week earlier near Boardman, likely the result of a run-in with a power line.  

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When Can The White House Use Executive Privilege?

19 hours ago

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