Jefferson Monthly

The Jefferson Monthly is JPR's members' magazine featuring articles, columns, and reviews about living in Southern Oregon and Northern California, as well as articles about finance, health and food from NPR.   The magazine also includes program listings for JPR's network of radio stations. The publication's monthly circulation is approximately 10,000.  To support JPR and receive your copy in the mail each month become a Member today!

The Southern Oregon Deer Debate

May 1, 2014
Steve Hillebrand / USDFW

They roam through town in groups of three and four at dusk, or pre-dawn. They hide under bushes at night. They trespass, hopping fences and taking what they want. They’re black-tailed deer, and they’re everywhere.

For residents of just about every town in Southern Oregon, the sight of two or three deer browsing in someone’s yard or languidly crossing a busy street hardly turns a head. In certain “hot spots”--Ashland, Jacksonville, parts of Grant’s Pass and Medford--it goes without saying that if you want a successful garden, you better protect it with a fence.

Photo: Jenny Graham / | Oregon Shakespeare Festival

A narcissistic ruler opts to abdicate his position of responsibility in exchange for personal freedom. He assumes that he will retain the privileges and respect afforded his former role. But the family member he has designated to take over betrays him. Instead of enjoying the comfortable life of his choice, he is exiled and undergoes a terrible ordeal. Last year at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, this premise devolved into the darkest of denouements in King Lear.

Raindance

Mar 31, 2014
Wikimedia Commons

I read somewhere recently that music flowed from Franz Schubert’s pen as naturally as rain falls from the clouds. Such a fitting analogy. Not just because he was one of the most prolific composers in history, but also because he used rain and water so often in his lieder (poetry written by others that he set to music). He’s not the only one, of course.

Why Northwest Mills Want China to Buy Lumber Instead of Logs

Mar 31, 2014
Photo: Cassandra Profita

Mark Elston followed his father into the timber industry back when business was booming.

“When I started, you could really mess things up and still make good money,” he said. “You can’t do that anymore.”

Elston runs a lumber mill in Tillamook, Ore., for Hampton Affiliates. The company has spent millions on energy efficiency and technology upgrades that allow his mill to make the most out of every log.

But despite those investments, the mill was on the ropes after the U.S. housing market collapsed in 2008.

Utopia/Dystopia

Mar 31, 2014
Photo: Max Ronnersjö / Wikimedia Commons

  I have a friend — brilliant and creative; the happiest guy I know. In fact, the tag line on his emails reads “The secret of life is to be happy.” Another of his favorite sayings is “Reality is overrated.” He follows all the latest developments in technology, but carefully avoids the news. He’s not just ignorant of current events; he’s innocent of them.

Photo: Bushnell-Perkins Studio

The thought of reviewing the range of non-professional theatre in the Rogue Valley, and pondering the question of what community theatre might be, has always intrigued me. Bear with me as I explore the rich history and bright future of community theatre, nestled right here amidst the peaks and valleys of the Siskiyou mountains.

R&R For Carl

Mar 31, 2014
Photo: Tony Nagelmann

After waking up well before dawn for 30 years and flying every week to Chicago for the past 15, Carl Kasell is ready for some well-earned R&R and has announced he’s retiring this spring after a five-decade career in broadcasting. Carl will record his final broadcasts for Wait Wait ... Don’t Tell Me! this spring during shows that are being planned to celebrate his career in Chicago and Washington, D.C.

Upon My Return

Mar 5, 2014

Coming back to JPR after nearly nine years has been a happy challenge for me.  In some ways, it’s been déjà vu all over again...

Last time I was in the JPR newsroom, I worked in the same studio and sat at the same desk as I do now. I’m working with a lot of the same people, too. And when I was moving back in, deep in one drawer I even found some old business cards of mine, from when I was JPR’s News Director in 2002–2005.

www.CeeCeeJames.com

By the time this issue of the Jefferson Monthly hits your mailboxes, the finals of the 2014 South Stage Cellars/Britt Festivals Rising Stars Competition will be upon us. On Saturday, March 1st, the four winners of the weekly competition rounds will be up on the Britt stage, performing for a cash grand prize, and fantastic opportunity to open one of this summer’s Britt Festivals concerts, and a 30-minute live session right here on Jefferson Public Radio.

The National Agenda

Mar 1, 2014

For better or worse, broadcasters of all stripes operate in a highly regulated environment. While we work hard to focus on and reflect life in our local communities, what goes on in Washington, D.C. impacts our work and can significantly affect our ability to serve citizens. Several national developments are underway that are worth watching.

Alys Holden, the new Director of Production at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, had held the same position at the Center Theatre Group in Los Angeles for over eight years. When Bill Rauch invited her to leave that professional pinnacle and sign on with the OSF, she had to make a tough choice. She decided to visit Ashland incognito, see a couple performances, and scout the town. Lunching in a local restaurant, she eavesdropped on the tourists—and they were all talking about the plays. “Nobody in L.A. talks about plays,” she said. She took the leap.

George Rubaloff

The artisan chocolate industry in Southern Oregon has found its sweet spot.

Ten years ago about the only local chocolate you could buy was made by Harry & David, Endangered Species, or Dagoba. The Oregon Chocolate Festival, which celebrates its 10th year from March 7-9, has helped nurture a local artisan chocolate industry and granted new shelf space to many new startups.

Spring is a wonderful time to be in Ashland.  The hills are green, cherry blossoms are in bloom, and the Ashland Independent Film Festival (AIFF) brings five days of world-class film to the Rogue Valley.  The 13th annual festival runs April 3-7 at the Varsity Theatre, the Historic Ashland Armory, the Ashland Street Cinemas, and the Ashland Springs Hotel.

A Look Inside

Feb 3, 2014

We can now say “news team” at JPR with a sense of accomplishment knowing that we have the ability to realize the full potential of that title with the addition of staff and resources. We’ll be joining you in each edition of the Jefferson Monthly with a look inside our burgeoning news operation.

True, “burgeoning” may be overstating things just a bit. But the last half of 2013 featured some key changes in what we offer to our listeners and web visitors under the banner of JPR News:

It’s the month where we commemorate love and romance with its very own day, February 14th, Valentine’s Day. Love and romance are all well and good, but boxes of chocolates, sexy lingerie, a fishing license— in other words presents—to your beloved only go so far in sealing the deal. For love to last, there is one more thing you absolutely need. It’s not as sexy or titillating as a Victoria Secret bustier or an Orvis reel but, at least from my humble perspective, it means much more. You want to go the distance? You need commitment.

University of Oregon

For years, museum conservators and paleontologists have yearned for a way to duplicate fragile fossils without damaging them. Now scientists with the University of Oregon say they have found a way to do just that, with the help of a relatively inexpensive 3-D printer.

The Internet was not designed with security in mind. It was developed by computer scientists, most who knew one another personally, with the goal of interconnecting computers (at the time, large mainframes) and moving data back and forth. Security adds a layer of complexity and the task before them was complex enough. So they pressed forward, perhaps unaware that they were laying an unsecure foundation for what would decades later become a critical global communications infrastructure that today has more than 8 billion computing devices connected to it.

Greg Eliason

The frustration in crafting this column is the long lag-time between deadline and publication date. Add to that the tradition of orienting December articles to holiday subjects, and my enthusiasm for the Southern Oregon University production last November of The White Fugue, devised and directed by James Donlon, becomes almost a why-bother-mention-it-now?

Recordings & Recorders

Feb 1, 2014

2013 proved to be a difficult year for me because several of my friends passed away, in England and here in the state of Jefferson. Among those I lost in this area are two men who made significant contributions to music: Jim Rich, who led the Jefferson Baroque Orchestra (JBO), and JPR’s own Brad Ranger.

JPR 2014

Feb 1, 2014

As we settle into the new year here at JPR, we’ve made some significant program changes that we hope you’ve had an opportunity to sample. We’ve shifted several of the programs that have been on the JPR airwaves for years between our three networks and have added several new programs to our schedule that have been high on our listener request list, such as Radiolab, The Moth Radio Hour and the return of Science Friday

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