Jefferson Monthly

The Jefferson Monthly is JPR's members' magazine featuring articles, columns, and reviews about living in Southern Oregon and Northern California, as well as a calendar of cultural events and program listings for JPR's network of radio stations. The publication's monthly circulation is approximately 10,000.  To support JPR and receive your copy in the mail each month become a Member today!

From The Archives

Nov 1, 2014

With Halloween over and done with and Thanksgiving right around the corner, this time of year always makes me want to hunker down in my apartment and bake good food while listening to good radio. This hibernation also gets me thinking of some of my favorite shows on the Jefferson Exchange this past year. So, as the weather gets dark and stormy and you’re looking for some cozy listening, here are some of my favorites. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

Organic: A Journalist’s Quest to Discover the Truth behind Food Labeling

Place

Nov 1, 2014

I have a new nearby option for Vietnamese food. I can walk to a corner parking lot and order my pho from Tam’s Place. But it’s not a place, at least not for anyone but Tam. It’s a food truck.

Eric Teel/JPR

As you might assume, I see a heck of a lot of live music each year. It’s an absolute blessing to be able to see so many amazing performers showcasing their ability at venues throughout Oregon and northern California. Last summer, I had the opportunity to experience my first true multi-day music festival: Pickathon. Held at privately owned Pendarvis Farm in Happy Valley, Oregon, Pickathon is a sight to behold. Three days of music, managed crowd density, no plastic, free water, reusable serving dishes for all food vendors, composting sites, solar panels, and on and on...

Aiming High

Oct 31, 2014

Depending on the speed of the US Postal Service in delivering this month’s Jefferson Monthly to your mailbox, JPR will either be in the final days of our Fall Fund Drive or will have just completed the campaign.  As we reach out to our listeners once again to ask for your continued support, it’s always energizing to step back from the day-to-day to remind ourselves of the big picture.

In Liisa and Shanti Shunn’s East Medford backyard, the couple’s three dogs—Dobby, Tucker, and Puck—leap and jump for the treats that Shanti offers. While these three dogs are permanent residents in the Shunn household, usually they share their home with foster dogs as well. In fact, Dobby is what Liisa and Shanti affectionately call a “foster failure”—a foster dog that they ended up adopting.

Objective News

Oct 1, 2014

Whatever became of “objective” news reporting? You know, the kind that just gives you the facts, without any slant or bias, the kind we used to have back in the good old days?

In this current era of shouting-heads cable TV shows and hot-talk radio and incendiary blog posts, when everyone with a Twitter account can make news, it’s understandable to pine for the lost paradise of “objective” journalism.                                                                                                                                                  

In its twenty-third season, Ashland New Plays Festival promises that ANPF 2014 will offer the most entertaining and edifying program yet.  To kick off the nine-day-long celebration, on Friday, October 17, OSF’s Dan Donohue will be interviewed by John Rose for a Theatre Talk.  The event will take place at 310 Oak Street, Ashland, and tickets are moving fast. 

Tom Lavine

The biography of Jim Giancarlo paints a portrait of the artist from a very early age. His boyhood fascination with producing neighborhood shows, his immersion in visual arts at SUNY Buffalo, his ongoing aspiration to be a writer—all were father to the multi-talented man who speculated recently, “Maybe the Creator’s plan is no plan at all.  Maybe ‘He’ just loves creating beauty.”

“Deep learning is a set of algorithms in machine learning that attempt to model high-level abstractions in data by using model architectures composed of multiple non-linear transformations.”

If that makes perfect sense to you, you’re way smarter than me and should probably be working as a computer scientist at Google or something. If you actually do work for Google, good for you. If not, you’re likely still smarter than me (not much to brag about), but it’s me on this side of the page who’s responsible for explaining all that gobbledygook about “deep learning”.

I’d like you to summon into your mind’s eye the greatest animal spectacle you’ve ever seen. Was it a cloud of Snow Geese filling the sky over the Klamath Basin?  Maybe you’ve been to Jackson Hole, and seen a great herd of elk in the shadow of the Grand Tetons.  Perhaps it was nothing more exotic than a swirling flock of starlings, one of those amazing “murmurations” that form over roosts along the Rogue River on winter evenings.

By the time you read this you may already have heard the work of a new reporter who will be working in the JPR newsroom.  Following a national search, Jes Burns has been selected as the new Southern Oregon EarthFix reporter based at JPR.  Jes comes to the Rogue Valley from Eugene where she’s worked for KLCC since 2007 as a reporter and All Things Considered host.  She’s produced some great features on environmental issues while covering KLCC’s science/technology feature beat.  Jes has also produced spot news and features as a freelancer for NPR, Sirius Radio’s

Michael Joyce

The first time I met Stephanie Stone was swimming. She is not a fast swimmer but a stalwart one. A staunch devotee of open water swimming. Hers is not the kind of personality to be contained by a pool. The lagoons of northern Humboldt County, with the ocean pounding a spit of sand away, Roosevelt elk grazing the brackish shoreline, and the whims of weather calling the shots, all seem to resonate with this midwife who’s grown accustomed to turbulent beauty.

While considering what to write for this month’s Recording’s column, I thought it would be interesting to write about the role of the producer on an artist’s album. However since that is such a broad topic that could literally fill volumes, I decided to focus on an artist who has been incredibly prolific lately as both a producer and an artist.

News is a buffet now. Think of all the choices we have… a huge variety of flavors and items—in words, in sounds, in pictures, in video…

When many of us were growing up, the choices were severely limited. Instead of a buffet, it was more like lunch in a school cafeteria: only available at certain times of day, and you had to make do with whatever the server plopped onto your plate. Mystery meat, anyone?

www.visualphotos.com

One of my favorite scenes from the sci-fi movie The Matrix Reloaded, is when the protagonist, Neo, accompanies Councillor Hamann down into the engineering level of Zion, the underground city where members of the last remaining human society are hiding out from the machines seeking to destroy them.

Happiness

Sep 2, 2014

The word didn’t come up until the last five minutes of a two-hour conversation. Eugene social psychology researcher Paul Slovic isn’t a fan of the “happiness” movement that has taken over many best-seller lists and self-help shelves. 

For more than a half-century, Slovic has focused his research on the underbelly of humanity, from addictive gambling to genocidal dictatorships. More precisely, he has concerned himself with how people respond to the atrocities, hoping to learn better ways to convey vital information to motivate people to act.

T. Charles Erickson

Rituals of initiation unfold in three phases: the first separates the individual from the world she’s taken for granted; the third reintegrates her into a new world as a changed person. Between the two is the liminal phase, in which the individual floats in a kind of dreamland of possibility, suspended between selves and social roles. Both terrifying and transformational, this in-between phase encourages a sort of regression to pre-conscious chaos. Into the Woods, the brilliant musical by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine, plants its action in just such a no-man’s land.

Meeting Vietnam

Sep 2, 2014
Pepper Trail

My memories of Vietnam begin in childhood. Rice paddies, in black and white. Strange skinny faces, unlike any I’d ever seen in my little hometown. Those funny round pointed hats. And, of course, helicopters, fascinating and frightening beasts, the blast from their rotors flattening the tropical grass as they came in for a landing, and then the soldiers, one hand on their helmets, the other carrying their M16s, jumping, running, disappearing into the jungle. It was quite a show, almost every night.

Public radio in the U.S. is an unusual amalgamation of locally owned stations and well known national networks. Together, these stations and networks partner each day to create and broadcast programs that touch the lives of nearly 35 million weekly listeners. Listeners tend to think about public radio as “NPR” but the reality is that NPR is only one piece of the public radio puzzle.

Blind Faith

Jul 31, 2014
Charlotte Duren

Being a talk show producer for public radio, I put a lot of trust, confidence, and sometimes faith—that the guests I am asking to be on the show- will show up and be knowledgeable on the topic we are discussing. And for the most part, they always are.

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