Jefferson Monthly

The Jefferson Monthly is JPR's members' magazine featuring articles, columns, and reviews about living in Southern Oregon and Northern California, as well as a calendar of cultural events and program listings for JPR's network of radio stations. The publication's monthly circulation is approximately 10,000.  To support JPR and receive your copy in the mail each month become a Member today!

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Jefferson Monthly Feature
10:18 am
Mon March 31, 2014

All The World’s A Stage: Theatrical Wealth in The Rogue Valley

Founded in 1935 by Angus L. Bowmer, Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) did not begin as a professional theatre. Pictured here, the 1935 production of Twelfth Night featuring Angus Bowmer as Sir Toby Belch and Robert Stedman as Feste.
Photo: Bushnell-Perkins Studio

The thought of reviewing the range of non-professional theatre in the Rogue Valley, and pondering the question of what community theatre might be, has always intrigued me. Bear with me as I explore the rich history and bright future of community theatre, nestled right here amidst the peaks and valleys of the Siskiyou mountains.

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Tuned In
10:03 am
Mon March 31, 2014

R&R For Carl

When Carl Kassell talks, Peter Sagal listens,
Photo: Tony Nagelmann

After waking up well before dawn for 30 years and flying every week to Chicago for the past 15, Carl Kasell is ready for some well-earned R&R and has announced he’s retiring this spring after a five-decade career in broadcasting. Carl will record his final broadcasts for Wait Wait ... Don’t Tell Me! this spring during shows that are being planned to celebrate his career in Chicago and Washington, D.C.

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First...The News
11:31 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Upon My Return

Coming back to JPR after nearly nine years has been a happy challenge for me.  In some ways, it’s been déjà vu all over again...

Last time I was in the JPR newsroom, I worked in the same studio and sat at the same desk as I do now. I’m working with a lot of the same people, too. And when I was moving back in, deep in one drawer I even found some old business cards of mine, from when I was JPR’s News Director in 2002–2005.

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Recordings
4:54 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

Digging For Gold In The Local Hills

Cee Cee James, winner of the 2014 Britt Rising Stars Competition, will be featured on Britt's main stage as an opening act in the 2014 season.
www.CeeCeeJames.com

By the time this issue of the Jefferson Monthly hits your mailboxes, the finals of the 2014 South Stage Cellars/Britt Festivals Rising Stars Competition will be upon us. On Saturday, March 1st, the four winners of the weekly competition rounds will be up on the Britt stage, performing for a cash grand prize, and fantastic opportunity to open one of this summer’s Britt Festivals concerts, and a 30-minute live session right here on Jefferson Public Radio.

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Tuned In
4:42 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

The National Agenda

For better or worse, broadcasters of all stripes operate in a highly regulated environment. While we work hard to focus on and reflect life in our local communities, what goes on in Washington, D.C. impacts our work and can significantly affect our ability to serve citizens. Several national developments are underway that are worth watching.

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Theatre
10:57 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Buildings That Won't Fall Down

Alys Holden

Alys Holden, the new Director of Production at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, had held the same position at the Center Theatre Group in Los Angeles for over eight years. When Bill Rauch invited her to leave that professional pinnacle and sign on with the OSF, she had to make a tough choice. She decided to visit Ashland incognito, see a couple performances, and scout the town. Lunching in a local restaurant, she eavesdropped on the tourists—and they were all talking about the plays. “Nobody in L.A. talks about plays,” she said. She took the leap.

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Jefferson Monthly Feature
10:36 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Ashland Chocolate Festival Celebrates Sweet Decade

Chocolate is an $83 billion a year business according to research firm MarketsandMarkets, putting that industry above the GDP of more than 130 nations.
George Rubaloff

The artisan chocolate industry in Southern Oregon has found its sweet spot.

Ten years ago about the only local chocolate you could buy was made by Harry & David, Endangered Species, or Dagoba. The Oregon Chocolate Festival, which celebrates its 10th year from March 7-9, has helped nurture a local artisan chocolate industry and granted new shelf space to many new startups.

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Jefferson Monthly Feature
2:51 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Ashland Independent Film Festival Announces This Year's List

Based on the classic Belgian book series by Gabrielle Vincent, Ernest & Celestine won France's César Award for Best Animated Feature, and has been nominated for Best Animated Feature at the 86th Academy Awards®.

Spring is a wonderful time to be in Ashland.  The hills are green, cherry blossoms are in bloom, and the Ashland Independent Film Festival (AIFF) brings five days of world-class film to the Rogue Valley.  The 13th annual festival runs April 3-7 at the Varsity Theatre, the Historic Ashland Armory, the Ashland Street Cinemas, and the Ashland Springs Hotel.

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First...The News
5:35 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

A Look Inside

Geoff Riley | JPR News Director & Host, Jefferson Exchange

We can now say “news team” at JPR with a sense of accomplishment knowing that we have the ability to realize the full potential of that title with the addition of staff and resources. We’ll be joining you in each edition of the Jefferson Monthly with a look inside our burgeoning news operation.

True, “burgeoning” may be overstating things just a bit. But the last half of 2013 featured some key changes in what we offer to our listeners and web visitors under the banner of JPR News:

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Jefferson Almanac
5:00 pm
Sat February 1, 2014

Commitment

It’s the month where we commemorate love and romance with its very own day, February 14th, Valentine’s Day. Love and romance are all well and good, but boxes of chocolates, sexy lingerie, a fishing license— in other words presents—to your beloved only go so far in sealing the deal. For love to last, there is one more thing you absolutely need. It’s not as sexy or titillating as a Victoria Secret bustier or an Orvis reel but, at least from my humble perspective, it means much more. You want to go the distance? You need commitment.

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EarthFix
4:44 pm
Sat February 1, 2014

How A 3-D Printer Is Helping Preserve A Saber-Toothed Salmon

A saber-toothed salmon, as depicted by artist Ray Troll. The mural is part of the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History.
University of Oregon

For years, museum conservators and paleontologists have yearned for a way to duplicate fragile fossils without damaging them. Now scientists with the University of Oregon say they have found a way to do just that, with the help of a relatively inexpensive 3-D printer.

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Inside The Box
4:36 pm
Sat February 1, 2014

Toward A Secure Internet

The Internet was not designed with security in mind. It was developed by computer scientists, most who knew one another personally, with the goal of interconnecting computers (at the time, large mainframes) and moving data back and forth. Security adds a layer of complexity and the task before them was complex enough. So they pressed forward, perhaps unaware that they were laying an unsecure foundation for what would decades later become a critical global communications infrastructure that today has more than 8 billion computing devices connected to it.

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Theatre
3:30 pm
Sat February 1, 2014

The [Unforgettable] White Fugue

From left: Michael Hays, Grace Wolcott, Cesar Perez-Rosas and Sierra Faulkner are featured in the ensemble performing the world premiere of “The White Fugue”.
Greg Eliason

The frustration in crafting this column is the long lag-time between deadline and publication date. Add to that the tradition of orienting December articles to holiday subjects, and my enthusiasm for the Southern Oregon University production last November of The White Fugue, devised and directed by James Donlon, becomes almost a why-bother-mention-it-now?

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Recordings
2:09 pm
Sat February 1, 2014

Recordings & Recorders

2013 proved to be a difficult year for me because several of my friends passed away, in England and here in the state of Jefferson. Among those I lost in this area are two men who made significant contributions to music: Jim Rich, who led the Jefferson Baroque Orchestra (JBO), and JPR’s own Brad Ranger.

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Tuned In
12:44 pm
Sat February 1, 2014

JPR 2014

As we settle into the new year here at JPR, we’ve made some significant program changes that we hope you’ve had an opportunity to sample. We’ve shifted several of the programs that have been on the JPR airwaves for years between our three networks and have added several new programs to our schedule that have been high on our listener request list, such as Radiolab, The Moth Radio Hour and the return of Science Friday

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Jefferson Monthly Feature
9:25 am
Fri January 31, 2014

Beer In The State Of Jefferson

Of the dozens of communities that share what JPR has to offer, many of them have their own breweries as well.

Oregon Beer. Those two words incite a lot of enthusiasm among beer lovers, seemingly the world over. Right here at home, Jefferson Public Radio’s signal is flung far and wide in the State of Jefferson, a land inhabited by a multitude of independent thinkers and a preponderance of beer-loving folks. As we know, southern Oregon is a diverse territory, with much to offer in the realm of food, wine, public radio, and for the purposes of this article, beer. But where does one begin when talking about what is known as Oregon beer? And what about northern California beer for that matter?

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Jefferson Monthly Feature
5:07 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

Tunnel 13: How Forensic Science Helped Solve America's Last Great Train Robbery

Tunnel 13, Ashland, Oregon - site of the last “great” train robbery in the west.
Pepper Trail

Every fall, the maples and dogwoods color the foothills of southern Oregon with yellow and orange highlights, flaring vibrant among the dark green pines. Through these Siskiyou Mountains, the railroad line once known as the “Road of a Thousand Wonders” snakes its way toward California, crossing moss-covered ravines on rickety trestles and piercing the mountain ridges with long dark tunnels.

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EarthFix
4:28 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

Wyden’s O&C Forest Bill Attempts to Balance Logging And Conservation

Foresters visit an old clear-cut on BLM land near Roseburg, Oregon.
Amelia Templeton

Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden has introduced a bill that sets the stage for sweeping changes in the management of 2.1 million acres of federal forest in Western Oregon.

The bill attempts to resolve decades of lawsuits over the Bureau of Land Management’s so-called O&C timberlands in Western Oregon by designating some areas for conservation and others for timber harvest. It would limit the environmental review process for logging in some designated harvest areas, while guaranteeing protection for stands of trees over 120 years old.

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Inside The Box
4:19 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

Shattered Windows

Anyone who has used the Microsoft Windows OS has most likely experience the "Blue Screen of Death."

An “operating system” is what underlies all the various digital devices you use on a daily basis. Without it, your smartphone, computer, or tablet is just a collection of silicon, plastic, various metals, and some glass. The operating system, or OS, is the software that allows these otherwise inanimate objects to come to life. Other applications hum along on top of the OS. Without it, these apps are just a collection of code that can do nothing.

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Theatre
4:16 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

The Camelot Challenge

Back in 2002, when Livia Genise became Artistic Director of Actor’s Theatre in Talent, she expressed her interest in producing the musical Annie, and her desire to make musicals a vital element of the theatre’s repertory. She heard plenty of discouraging words. Their gist: the Rogue Valley lacked the performers necessary to support such an enterprise. Eleven seasons have passed since Annie played to resounding applause, and they have proved the naysayers wrong.

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