Jefferson Monthly

The Jefferson Monthly is JPR's members' magazine featuring articles, columns, and reviews about living in Southern Oregon and Northern California, as well as a calendar of cultural events and program listings for JPR's network of radio stations. The publication's monthly circulation is approximately 10,000.  To support JPR and receive your copy in the mail each month become a Member today!

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Theatre
9:58 am
Tue July 1, 2014

When Families Collide: OSF Presents Quiara Alegria Hude's Water By The Spoonful

John (Barret O'Brien) tends to Odessa (Vilma Silva) in the OSF production of Quiara Alegria Hude’s Water by the Spoonful.
Credit Jenny Graham

I confess: Thornton Wilder’s Our Town was never my town. The notion of family rooted in the same rural village for generations is light years from my reality as the grandchild of immigrants and a migrant military brat. Similarly, despite Wilder’s innovations in dramatic technique, the human condition as portrayed through Grovers Corners seems abnormally normal.

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Jefferson Monthly Feature
9:49 am
Tue July 1, 2014

Reno? No, Really!

Reno, The Biggest Little City (Neon sign shot): Reno's tag line is the Biggest Little City in the World. Neon lights, strip clubs, and casinos vie for visitors alongside foodie restaurants, a world famous climbing wall, and a thriving art and music scene.
Jennifer Margulis

When my brother was getting a Master’s degree at U.C. Berkeley in the early 1990s he’d take road trips to Reno, Nevada every once in a while. After all, it was cheaper than Las Vegas, and a quicker drive. Zach would find himself a motel for 20 bucks a night and hit the casinos, playing low stakes Blackjack as an antidote to the pressure cooker of his graduate studies.

That’s long been my image of Reno: a mostly seedy, rather rundown adult playground where prostitution is legal, everybody smokes, and steak is the meat on every menu.

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Tuned In
9:24 am
Tue July 1, 2014

The NPR Newsroom 2.0

NPR and member stations across the country are joining forces to bring listeners news and analysis.

NPR recently announced a restructuring of its newsroom designed to more efficiently utilize resources while expanding editorial hubs that combine the digital and audio work of its reporters, editors, producers and bloggers around specific areas of focus.

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Media & Society
3:42 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Revealing The “Tense” In The Middle Of “Utensils”

Civilized society no longer needs that extra fork.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

 I think we can all agree that salad forks have not fulfilled their promise. It was a noble experiment, if by that you mean something tried by nobility or those feigning nobility.   

Salads have changed over the years. Now we add all sorts of doodads on top of our lettuce. Those longer tines of the regular fork come in handy when eating a modern salad. You need that extra quarter inch for the craisins and bleu cheese chunks. Salads have even sometimes replaced the main course of a meal. The salad fork did not adapt.

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Inside The Box
3:30 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Tinder Is The Night

Tinder, the hottest new dating app, makes it easier than ever to meet a stranger.

 

"Someday I’m going to find

somebody and love him and

love him and never let him go.”

‑from Tender Is The Night
by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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Jefferson Monthly Feature
3:18 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Stepping Through Time: Hiking In The Applegate

Hinkle Lake, nestled in the Applegate.
Greg Painton

  The hiking season is here!

I guess any season is hiking season in the Applegate area of Southern Oregon, but when the snow melts on the higher elevation trails and you can put on your hiking boots and take off for the mountains, excitement rises.

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Theatre
11:43 am
Thu May 22, 2014

The Sign of Genius: Oregon Shakespeare Festival's "The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window"

Alton Scales (Armando McClain) is interested in the news in Iris' (Sofia Jean Gomez) sister's letter.
Jenny Graham

Lorraine Hansberry’s premature death from cancer in 1965 at the age of the thirty-four deprived American theatre of a brilliant light. Her first play, A Raisin in the Sun, had dazzled Broadway in 1959, winning the New York Drama Critics Circle Award.  Only one other play, The Sign in Sidney Brustein’s Window, saw production in her lifetime, and her deteriorating health severely challenged its development.

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Theatre
12:36 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Oregon Shakespeare Festival Presents Comedies With Heart

The Cocoanuts | Detective Hennessey (David Kelly, center) has much to sing about at the wedding rehearsal dinner. Ensemble.
Jenny Graham

The two comedies anchoring the 2014 season at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival put the accent on zany shenanigans. The Cocoanuts, by Irving Berlin and George S. Kaufman, was created as a vehicle for the legendary Marx Brothers—vaudeville veterans with a bottomless bag of comic shticks. And the title of Shakespeare’s early The Comedy of Errors says it all: mistaken identities, compounding misunderstandings, escalating farce.

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Tuned In
10:27 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Good News...Bad News About Federal Funding

Language contained in House Republican’s FY 2015 budget blueprint released in early April calls for the elimination of all funding for public broadcasting.

The appropriations season is unfolding in Washington D.C. and there is both good news and bad news to report related to continued funding for public broadcasting stations around the country.

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Jefferson Monthly Feature
9:56 am
Thu May 1, 2014

The Southern Oregon Deer Debate

A perfect storm of conditions spawns ballooning deer populations in Ashland, Ore.
Steve Hillebrand USDFW

They roam through town in groups of three and four at dusk, or pre-dawn. They hide under bushes at night. They trespass, hopping fences and taking what they want. They’re black-tailed deer, and they’re everywhere.

For residents of just about every town in Southern Oregon, the sight of two or three deer browsing in someone’s yard or languidly crossing a busy street hardly turns a head. In certain “hot spots”--Ashland, Jacksonville, parts of Grant’s Pass and Medford--it goes without saying that if you want a successful garden, you better protect it with a fence.

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Theatre
11:34 am
Mon March 31, 2014

The Tempest: Shakespeare’s Final Answer

Denis Arndt as Prospero and Kate Hurster as Ariel in "The Tempest."
Photo: Jenny Graham | Oregon Shakespeare Festival

A narcissistic ruler opts to abdicate his position of responsibility in exchange for personal freedom. He assumes that he will retain the privileges and respect afforded his former role. But the family member he has designated to take over betrays him. Instead of enjoying the comfortable life of his choice, he is exiled and undergoes a terrible ordeal. Last year at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, this premise devolved into the darkest of denouements in King Lear.

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Recordings
11:27 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Raindance

Credit Wikimedia Commons

I read somewhere recently that music flowed from Franz Schubert’s pen as naturally as rain falls from the clouds. Such a fitting analogy. Not just because he was one of the most prolific composers in history, but also because he used rain and water so often in his lieder (poetry written by others that he set to music). He’s not the only one, of course.

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EarthFix
11:03 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Why Northwest Mills Want China to Buy Lumber Instead of Logs

Tillamook mill manager Mark Elston says without efforts to export lumber to China, his mill would have gone under.
Photo: Cassandra Profita

Mark Elston followed his father into the timber industry back when business was booming.

“When I started, you could really mess things up and still make good money,” he said. “You can’t do that anymore.”

Elston runs a lumber mill in Tillamook, Ore., for Hampton Affiliates. The company has spent millions on energy efficiency and technology upgrades that allow his mill to make the most out of every log.

But despite those investments, the mill was on the ropes after the U.S. housing market collapsed in 2008.

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Jefferson Almanac
10:38 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Utopia/Dystopia

Credit Photo: Max Ronnersjö / Wikimedia Commons

  I have a friend — brilliant and creative; the happiest guy I know. In fact, the tag line on his emails reads “The secret of life is to be happy.” Another of his favorite sayings is “Reality is overrated.” He follows all the latest developments in technology, but carefully avoids the news. He’s not just ignorant of current events; he’s innocent of them.

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Jefferson Monthly Feature
10:18 am
Mon March 31, 2014

All The World’s A Stage: Theatrical Wealth in The Rogue Valley

Founded in 1935 by Angus L. Bowmer, Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) did not begin as a professional theatre. Pictured here, the 1935 production of Twelfth Night featuring Angus Bowmer as Sir Toby Belch and Robert Stedman as Feste.
Photo: Bushnell-Perkins Studio

The thought of reviewing the range of non-professional theatre in the Rogue Valley, and pondering the question of what community theatre might be, has always intrigued me. Bear with me as I explore the rich history and bright future of community theatre, nestled right here amidst the peaks and valleys of the Siskiyou mountains.

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Tuned In
10:03 am
Mon March 31, 2014

R&R For Carl

When Carl Kassell talks, Peter Sagal listens,
Photo: Tony Nagelmann

After waking up well before dawn for 30 years and flying every week to Chicago for the past 15, Carl Kasell is ready for some well-earned R&R and has announced he’s retiring this spring after a five-decade career in broadcasting. Carl will record his final broadcasts for Wait Wait ... Don’t Tell Me! this spring during shows that are being planned to celebrate his career in Chicago and Washington, D.C.

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First...The News
11:31 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Upon My Return

Coming back to JPR after nearly nine years has been a happy challenge for me.  In some ways, it’s been déjà vu all over again...

Last time I was in the JPR newsroom, I worked in the same studio and sat at the same desk as I do now. I’m working with a lot of the same people, too. And when I was moving back in, deep in one drawer I even found some old business cards of mine, from when I was JPR’s News Director in 2002–2005.

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Recordings
4:54 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

Digging For Gold In The Local Hills

Cee Cee James, winner of the 2014 Britt Rising Stars Competition, will be featured on Britt's main stage as an opening act in the 2014 season.
www.CeeCeeJames.com

By the time this issue of the Jefferson Monthly hits your mailboxes, the finals of the 2014 South Stage Cellars/Britt Festivals Rising Stars Competition will be upon us. On Saturday, March 1st, the four winners of the weekly competition rounds will be up on the Britt stage, performing for a cash grand prize, and fantastic opportunity to open one of this summer’s Britt Festivals concerts, and a 30-minute live session right here on Jefferson Public Radio.

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Tuned In
4:42 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

The National Agenda

For better or worse, broadcasters of all stripes operate in a highly regulated environment. While we work hard to focus on and reflect life in our local communities, what goes on in Washington, D.C. impacts our work and can significantly affect our ability to serve citizens. Several national developments are underway that are worth watching.

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Theatre
10:57 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Buildings That Won't Fall Down

Alys Holden

Alys Holden, the new Director of Production at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, had held the same position at the Center Theatre Group in Los Angeles for over eight years. When Bill Rauch invited her to leave that professional pinnacle and sign on with the OSF, she had to make a tough choice. She decided to visit Ashland incognito, see a couple performances, and scout the town. Lunching in a local restaurant, she eavesdropped on the tourists—and they were all talking about the plays. “Nobody in L.A. talks about plays,” she said. She took the leap.

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