tsunami

phys.org/John Chapman

The 2011 Tohuku earthquake and tsunami in Japan sent plenty of debris across the Pacific.  Boats, docks, and more ended up on Oregon beaches. 

And they were occupied; not by people, but by species unknown on this side of the ocean. 

How big an effect was it, and how common is "species rafting?" 

These questions are explored in a recent report by scientists at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology and the Hatfield Marine Science Center of Oregon State University. 

Our part of the world is prone to earthquakes and resulting tsunamis. 

In coastal communities, it's easy to know where to go TO, should a tsunami warning sound.  But that doesn't cover where you should run FROM. 

A new online app developed by Todd Becker, an environmental analyst for Humboldt County, shows the tsunami evacuation zones in the county. 

So you can check on a phone which areas should be left behind once the ground shakes. 

The devastating Japanese earthquake of March 11, 2001, killed nearly 20,000 people and hurled an 8 to 10-foot tsunami across the Pacific into Oregon and California ports, causing damage, one death and washing some people out to sea.

Wikimedia

The Japanese earthquake and tsunami of 2011 continues to leave a mark on our side of the Pacific. 

The tsunami created by the quake trashed a couple of ports in our region. 

And measurements in the ocean show elevated--though still considered safe--levels of radioactivity, likely the result of the disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power plant

Ken Buesseler of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution knows about radiation in the ocean, normal and not. 

Oregon Produces Tsunami Comic

Oct 27, 2016
OEM/Dark Horse Comics

The person in charge of keeping Oregon informed of earthquake hazards has a side job writing comic books. 

Check that; writing comic books is PART of her job. 

Althea Rizzo is the author of a comic story on how Oregonians can prepare for, and survive, a tsunami. 

This is the second comic book collaboration between Oregon's emergency management agency and Dark Horse Comics, based in Milwaukie. 

Living With The Threat Of Tsunami

Jul 25, 2016

Tsunamis are not unknown on the West Coast.  In fact, plenty of people alive today can remember them. 

Like Tom Horning, who nearly lost his life in the 1964 tsunami and decided to return to live in Seaside, Oregon... which could well see another unwelcome visit from the ocean. 

Bonnie Henderson writes about Tom Horning and the potential for disaster in The Next Tsunami, from Oregon State University Press. 

Remembering Crescent City's 1964 Tsunami

Mar 27, 2014
Public Domain

It's not a happy memory, but it's an important one: a tsunami wiped out downtown Crescent City, California on this date in 1964. 

A huge earthquake in Alaska caused the tsunami.

Oregon Emergency Managers Take Earthquake Trip

Sep 16, 2013
Mark Lincoln/Wikimedia

What's in your earthquake kit?

The answer to that question is often "uh, I don't have one yet."  Which is why Oregon's Office of Emergency Management is hosting the Quake Prep Talk Road Show, visiting counties in the southern and southwestern portions of the state--the places most likely to feel the impacts of a major quake along the Cascadia Subduction Zone.