surveillance

Wikimedia

People used to crack jokes about their phones being tapped. 

It's less of a joke than it used to be, given the knowledge of how extensive the federal government's surveillance apparatus is.  Does the government pick up as much information as we give freely through social media and smartphone app choices? 

Kristian Williams answers that question and others in an Oregon Humanities Conversation Project on "Keeping Tabs on America: Surveillance and You." 

Select Books

A surprising number of Americans are willing to give up a little privacy for a little security.

Do NOT count John Whitehead among them.  Whitehead is a civil libertarian and an attorney who fights--sometimes in court--for civil liberties like privacy. 

He offers his take on what he sees as a growing police state in his book Government of Wolves

The Surveillance State: "Spying On Democracy"

Oct 29, 2013
City Lights Books

So you use your "club card" to check out at the supermarket. 

The clerk thanks you by name, and you get a coupon for an item you might like, based on your past purchases.