Signals & Noise

Your local radio station, this one included, doesn't necessarily have to be local anymore. 

The FCC required local stations to keep studios in the cities to which they were licensed.  But that rule will be allowed to drop, so the friendly voice in Klamath Falls may actually be in Chicago. 

That's just one topic in the media of late.  There are always PLENTY of others, as explored by our partners on the communication faculty at Southern Oregon University

Our montly perusal of media topics is called "Signals & Noise." 

There's never a dull moment in the media world these days, especially since anyone with a Facebook or Twitter account can get a message to the entire (wired) world.  How DOES someone break through the clutter and reach an audience? 

That is one of the questions always in the background as we discuss events in media with Andrew Gay and Chris Lucas of the Communications faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

It's a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

News from around the world in an instant.  Summer movies.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

News from around the world in an instant.  Summer movies.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

The concept of a "slow news day" seems like so long ago. 

The inauguration of Donald Trump is just one factor in what seems to be an hourly, rather than daily, explosion of news in the world.  And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise."  This month, Twitter bots, Wonder Woman on the big screen, Congressional testimony carried live and more. 

Arturo Pardavila III, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49782715

One giant TV chain wants to buy another giant TV chain. 

Stephen Colbert's presidential insults draw the attention of the FCC chair. 

Social media "influencers" played a role in the recent Fyre Festival fiasco. 

Yep, always SOMETHING to talk about in the media, and we gather up some highlights for our monthly chat "Signals & Noise" with Southern Oregon University Communications faculty Precious Yamaguchi and Andrew Gay. 

All you need is a phone that reaches the Internet.  And with that in your hand, your media options are limitless.  In this media age, it can be hard to separate the signals from the noise. 

Which is why we take time each month for a media perusal, called "Signals & Noise," with members of the communications faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

This month we visit with Andrew Gay and Christopher Lucas about Pulitzer Prize winners, crowdfunding for documentary films, and other issues on the media horizon. 

Bidgee, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7437952

There's never a dull moment in media lately.  President Trump has gone from talking about "fake news" to declaring members of the news media "enemies of the people." 

And on the lighter side, who handed Warren Beatty that wrong envelope at the Oscars? 

We track the changes in the world of information in a segment called Signals & Noise.  Our partners: the Communications department at Southern Oregon University. 

Information Today: Signals & Noise

Feb 8, 2017
Stefan Kühn, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=105738

It's a weird time in the history of information.  On one hand, the Internet makes so much information available so quickly, it's easy to stay informed. 

On the other hand, people fight about facts and truth far more than they used to, and the president himself even referred to a news organization as "fake news" shortly before he took office. 

We track the changes in the world of information in a new segment called Signals & Noise, starting today. 

Our partners: the Communications department at Southern Oregon University.