Signals & Noise

Signals & Noise & New Building & VR

Jul 6, 2018

It seems appropriate that we have a robust discussion of the media in JPR's brand-new home. 

Monday, July 9th, will be the first day in the long-awaited (49 years) history of JPR broadcasting from someplace OTHER than a basement.  And our friends from the Communications faculty at Southern Oregon University return for this month's edition of Signals & Noise. 

Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi will discuss items in a broad range of media, from virtual reality to books.  In fact, we plan to use a VR camera to record this first live segment in the new place. 

Remember when news got to us once a day, maybe twice?  Yeah, we barely do either. 

It bombards us all the time, through news and tweets and texts and more. 

Once a month we take stock of the media landscape with Precious Yamaguchi and Andrew Gay, who teach Communications courses at Southern Oregon University

It's another rich month of material to consider: think Roseanne Barr and the tweet that killed a TV show. 

Comedy fans may have known who Michelle Wolf is, but the rest of the country learned her name after the recent White House Correspondents Dinner. 

Wolf's razzing of reporters and administration mouthpieces is just one of many developments in the media in the last month. 

And it will come up for discussion when we reconvene with Precious Yamaguchi and Andrew Gay of the Southern Oregon University Communication faculty.  They visit once a month for an omnivorous media segment we call Signals & Noise. 

If we had more money, we could probably turn our monthly Signals & Noise media segment into a 24-hour service. 

There's just THAT much to talk about in the media, all day and every day.  Especially since we define "media" broadly, to include everything from modern social media to books. 

Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi from the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University are our regulars.  We tee up some key issues in the media--like the promo copy all the anchors of Sinclair TV stations were required to read--and discuss. 

The aftermath of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida was an upheaval in political and media realms. 

The surviving students made their displeasure with gun laws and other factors plain immediately, demonstrating once again the power of new media--social media--in today's world.  That's just one topic we'll take up in this month's Signals & Noise segment. 

That's our monthly conclave with Precious Yamaguchi and Andrew Gay, members of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

We are not kidding when we say the media landscape changes at lightning speed in today's world. 

Who would have thought major news organizations would quote the purported comments of the president and say "s**thole" on the air?  But it happened, just hours after the last Signals & Noise segment. 

That's our monthly conclave with members of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University

Szánthó Zoltán, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49501159

Trump and The Book.  Those four words make an impactful statement at the moment, as the White House deals with the revelations in Michael Wolfe's book "Fire and Fury."  

That's one of several major stories simmering on the media stove at the moment. 

Others: Oprah at the Golden Globes, net neutrality gets a vote in Congress, and more. 

There's always something new to digest and discuss in Signals & Noise, our monthly conclave with members of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

Harland Quarrington/Wikimedia Commons

It can be truly difficult to keep up with the ever-changing media landscape.  Even for us, and we're PART of the media. 

Just consider the recent news items about media (and political) figures accused of sexual misconduct. 

Or the effort to end net neutrality through federal regulatory action. 

There's always something new to digest and discuss in Signals & Noise, our monthly conclave with members of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

Your local radio station, this one included, doesn't necessarily have to be local anymore. 

The FCC required local stations to keep studios in the cities to which they were licensed.  But that rule will be allowed to drop, so the friendly voice in Klamath Falls may actually be in Chicago. 

That's just one topic in the media of late.  There are always PLENTY of others, as explored by our partners on the communication faculty at Southern Oregon University

Our montly perusal of media topics is called "Signals & Noise." 

There's never a dull moment in the media world these days, especially since anyone with a Facebook or Twitter account can get a message to the entire (wired) world.  How DOES someone break through the clutter and reach an audience? 

That is one of the questions always in the background as we discuss events in media with Andrew Gay and Chris Lucas of the Communications faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

It's a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

News from around the world in an instant.  Summer movies.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

News from around the world in an instant.  Summer movies.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

The concept of a "slow news day" seems like so long ago. 

The inauguration of Donald Trump is just one factor in what seems to be an hourly, rather than daily, explosion of news in the world.  And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise."  This month, Twitter bots, Wonder Woman on the big screen, Congressional testimony carried live and more. 

Arturo Pardavila III, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49782715

One giant TV chain wants to buy another giant TV chain. 

Stephen Colbert's presidential insults draw the attention of the FCC chair. 

Social media "influencers" played a role in the recent Fyre Festival fiasco. 

Yep, always SOMETHING to talk about in the media, and we gather up some highlights for our monthly chat "Signals & Noise" with Southern Oregon University Communications faculty Precious Yamaguchi and Andrew Gay. 

All you need is a phone that reaches the Internet.  And with that in your hand, your media options are limitless.  In this media age, it can be hard to separate the signals from the noise. 

Which is why we take time each month for a media perusal, called "Signals & Noise," with members of the communications faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

This month we visit with Andrew Gay and Christopher Lucas about Pulitzer Prize winners, crowdfunding for documentary films, and other issues on the media horizon. 

Bidgee, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7437952

There's never a dull moment in media lately.  President Trump has gone from talking about "fake news" to declaring members of the news media "enemies of the people." 

And on the lighter side, who handed Warren Beatty that wrong envelope at the Oscars? 

We track the changes in the world of information in a segment called Signals & Noise.  Our partners: the Communications department at Southern Oregon University. 

Information Today: Signals & Noise

Feb 8, 2017
Stefan Kühn, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=105738

It's a weird time in the history of information.  On one hand, the Internet makes so much information available so quickly, it's easy to stay informed. 

On the other hand, people fight about facts and truth far more than they used to, and the president himself even referred to a news organization as "fake news" shortly before he took office. 

We track the changes in the world of information in a new segment called Signals & Noise, starting today. 

Our partners: the Communications department at Southern Oregon University.