Rogue Indian wars

USDA Forest Service

Archaeologists from the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology--SOULA--thrilled in recent years to a key discovery. 

Crews found the site of the battle of "Hungry Hill," which the American military powers-that-be probably wanted to forget. 

The battle pitted the Army against Native Americans in the Rogue River Indian Wars, and the native people won the battle--under the leadership of a woman. 

One of the most horrible incidents of the Rogue Indian wars of 1855-56 was the midnight slaughter of John Geisel and his three boys by knife-wielding Indians at their home near Gold Beach, Ore.  The Indians burned the house and abducted Geisel’s wife, Christina, and two daughters, Mary, 13, and infant Annie.  It’s a story that’s been told many times.