Friesen Press

The Earth's population grows by about 200,000 people every day.  That's roughly the population of Eugene PLUS the population of Ashland PLUS Grants Pass thrown in as well.  How long can we keep this up?

That's the central question of environmental journalist Paul Hanley's book 11, a reference to the 11 Billion people who may occupy the planet by the end of the 21st century. 

He's got some ideas about how to slow and reverse the growth. 


Paul Ehrlich scared a lot of people with his book "The Population Bomb" in 1968. 

That same year, the group ZPG--Zero Population Growth--was born.  The dire predictions Ehrlich laid out have largely not come to pass--some people say "yet"--but the concern about the world getting overpopulated remains. 

ZPG is still on the scene, but with a different name: Population Connection

Public Domain

It will be hard indeed to lower the amount of carbon in the atmosphere if the planet's population continues to grow. 

Project Drawdown is a coalition of organizations determined to bring greenhouse gases down, through a variety of means. 

One of those means is a focus on population growth, and ways to slow the birth rate to a sustainable level, especially in developing countries where resources for large populations of children are scarce. 

Alisha Graves centers her work on population issues for Project Drawdown, The Oasis Initiative, and Venture Strategies for Health and Development

University of Chicago Press

Environmentalists tend to tread carefully around the subject of population.

In a planet of finite resources and no place to throw things "away," overpopulation could devastate the Earth. 

Philip Cafaro has been talking for years about the intersection between environmentalism and population studies. 

In his latest book, "How Many Is Too Many?," Cafaro narrows the focus on immigration into the United States... and makes a rare progressive (not conservative) argument for reducing it. 

Hashtagging World Population Day

Jul 11, 2014

We welcome you to World Population Day! 

And you, and you, and you…  you get the idea here. 

Earth is home to an estimated 7.2 Billion people, and today (July 11) is the day several organizations want people to consider the impacts.