Native Americans.

Crater Lake Institute

Crater Lake is pretty and placid now, but it was born of violence: the eruption of what we call Mount Mazama. 

People lived in the region back then, and evidence of their habitation was buried under volcanic ash in Western Oregon valleys. 

University of Oregon researcher Brian O'Neill has been digging under the ash, uncovering clues to the people who lived in the land when Mazama was just a tall mountain. 

Peltier Art Gallery Facebook page

Leonard Peltier went to prison 40 years ago, convicted in the shooting of two FBI agents on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

To this day, supporters say Peltier is being held as a political prisoner, punished for his role in the American Indian Movement. 

Now his son Chauncey, an Oregon resident, is ignoring his father's advice to avoid the legal morass surrounding Peltier senior.  Chauncey curates and sells the artwork his father creates in prison. 

Oregon State University Press

Drive down a coastal highway in our region, and you're sure to see a sign advertising myrtlewood for sale. 

But the tree has value beyond its wood: Native Americans in the region ate parts of it.  That's one of many stories to emerge from the book Ethnobotany of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians

Patricia Whereat Phillips, herself Miluk Coos, is the book's author. 

The likes of Roseburg High School don't have to change mascots after all.  A change in state policy allows the school's teams to remain the "Roseburg Indians" with the consent of a nearby tribe. 

How do YOU feel about native american mascots?  Tell us in this week's VENTSday, Wednesday morning. 

Or talk about the value and practice of allowing cattle grazing on public land.   VENTSday is YOUR forum for discussing topics in the news... we identify the topics, you do the rest, every Wednesday around 8:30 AM.

USDA Forest Service

Archaeologists from the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology--SOULA--thrilled in recent years to a key discovery. 

Crews found the site of the battle of "Hungry Hill," which the American military powers-that-be probably wanted to forget. 

The battle pitted the Army against Native Americans in the Rogue River Indian Wars, and the native people won the battle--under the leadership of a woman. 

DiversiTV

At a time when Native Americans no longer rule the landscape, Agnes Baker Pilgrim is a towering presence.

Agnes, who also goes by Taowhywee, is the oldest surviving Takelma, at age 91. 

She was already highly in demand before an Ashland publisher put out Grandma Says: "Wake Up, World!" The Wisdom, Wit, Advice and Stories of Grandma Aggie, in both printed and audio forms. 

Kenneth Ingham/National Park Service

Open warfare broke out between the U.S. government and Native Americans many times in our region in the late 19th century. 

The incidents include the Modoc War of the 1870s, which took place in and around what is now the Lava Beds National Monument. 

The Modoc War and its setting have been explored many times in print, including the book Modoc: The Tribe That Wouldn't Die by Cheewa James, and a new book on the Lava Beds themselves by Herald and News (Klamath Falls) reporter Lee Juillerat. 

Depicting Native Americans In Project 562

Feb 18, 2014
matikawilbur.com

There's not a lot of in-between in mass media depictions of Native Americans. 

We often get either the Hollywood depictions of noble warriors from the movies, or the news stories about alcoholism and poverty on the reservation. 

Tribal Services Suffer Under Shutdown

Oct 7, 2013

If the government shutdown goes on too long, it will mean the end of services for the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians.

The Confederated Tribes have enough funding to last two to three weeks. For now, the tribes have funding to maintain police and health care services.