marijuana

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Legal marijuana is a rapidly-growing reality. Four states, including Oregon and Washington, have legalized recreational use of the drug. Several more – including California – could well do so by the end of next year. Forty states have legalized it in some form for medicinal use.

Now, US Senators from Oregon, Washington and Colorado hope to start breaking down the federal barriers that lock many legal cannabis businesses out of routine banking and financial services.

The Crimes They Are A-Changin'

Jul 6, 2015

Marijuana is legal in Oregon, so now what?  While the state prepares the way for retail sales to begin, a lot of other details have to be settled.  

For one thing, what happens to people who were charged and convicted for marijuana crimes that are NO LONGER crimes?  

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The Countdown to Legalization is almost at zero.

On July 1st, Oregon residents will be able to grow and possess marijuana for recreational use, under state law. 

Measure 91's approach produced a flurry of activity, including many interviews and reports. 

Those include a segment of Oregon Public Broadcasting's "Think Out Loud" talk show. 

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You take medicine because it's supposed to be good for you.

Oregon voters made marijuana a medicine in the belief that it would help people. 

But a recent investigation by The Oregonian (Oregon Live online) found holes in regulations and testing regimes led to the presence of pesticides in some medical pot. 

Oregon Growers Analytical tests marijuana for pesticides and other contaminants. 

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While it's true marijuana will be legal for recreational use in Oregon in just days (July 1st), that does not mean a "smoke 'em if you got 'em" free-for-all. 

First of all, the law phases in, so there will not be retail sales until probably fall of 2016.  Second, pot cannot be smoked in a public place. 

A recently launched "Educate Before You Recreate" campaign aims to communicate the law's nuances to the public. 

The Marijuana Show

It seems like anybody with even the barest claim to fame gets a reality TV show these days.

So marijuana is long overdue, but there IS such a show.

"The Marijuana Show," seen online and on digital channels, bears some resemblance to "Shark Tank," in that entrepreneurs pitch their ideas for marijuana-based businesses. 

"Ganjapreneurs" from season 2 will be recruited from auditions in California and Oregon, among other states. 

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The countdown is on to legal marijuana in Oregon.  Legal pot for PERSONAL use, that is. 

It becomes legal on July 1st, thanks to voter passage of Measure 91 last November. 

Somebody's got to craft rules under the law, and that is the domain of the OLCC, Oregon Liquor Control Commission. 

Brent Kenyon of Southern Oregon Alternative Medicine in Ashland is a member of a committee advising OLCC.  He joins us with word of his views and the advising process. 

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You can be forgiven if you forget that marijuana is still illegal in California, except for medical uses. 

And part of the confusion comes from various state and local government agencies setting up rules and guidelines for marijuana cultivation. 

The North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board is among them, working toward a set of water quality regulations for marijuana growers. 

Unregulated use of water causes issues both coming and going; involving water taken from streams and wastes put into them. 

Chris Lehman/Northwest News Network

Starting in July, adults in Oregon can legally use recreational marijuana.

But thousands of Oregonians will still have criminal records for marijuana offenses that would have been legal under the new law. Now, Oregon lawmakers are considering a proposal to wipe the slate clean for people convicted of certain marijuana offenses.

Details of the measure are still being negotiated but it's likely to apply only to people who did things that will be legal once the voter-approved Measure 91 takes effect.

Michael Joyce/JPR

As April 20th approaches, civil liberty activist and city officials in Arcata, California are at an impasse.

Is the annual gathering of marijuana smokers at 4:20 PM on April 20th -- so-called “4-20” --  a protected first amendment activity? Or is it a pot party run amok?   

OLCC Talks Pot, Listens A Lot

Feb 17, 2015
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Got a few thoughts on HOW marijuana should be regulated when it goes legal in Oregon? 

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission--OLCC--will host several more "Listening Sessions" to take input on pot rules. 

Pot for personal turns legal on July 1st.  Public meetings are set for Ashland and Klamath Falls this Wednesday and Thursday (February 18-19) respectively. 

Oregon Prepares For Legal Weed

Jan 9, 2015
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A new year is here, but legal pot is still about six months away in Oregon. 

Voter passage of Measure 91 last November set the date for legal marijuana for personal use at July 1st. 

And a lot has to happen before then to get users, sellers and authorities ready. 

Attorney Robert McVay has been tracking pot issues for a long time, on the pro-pot side. 

United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Oregon voters legalized marijuana for personal, recreational use in Election 2014, passing Ballot Measure 91.

By 10 PM Election Night, returns showed a Yes vote of roughly 54%.  Major news organizations projected a final victory for the measure.

The vote allows Oregon to join Washington and Colorado in the ranks of legal pot states. 

The No Position On Legal Pot

Oct 21, 2014
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Oregon can at least look to two other states for ideas about what might happen if voters legalize marijuana. 

Washington and Colorado both voted pot legal two years ago, learning a number of lessons since legalization. 

Passage of Measure 91 in Oregon's November election would add the state to the other two. 

RickSteves.com

Any statewide vote on legalizing marijuana for personal use is going to draw attention. 

Oregon's vote on Measure 91 in November already had plenty of that. 

Now it gets more, from an unlikely source. 

Public TV and radio travel expert Rick Steves is weighing in on the issue, on the Yes side. 

Yurok Tribes Raid Pot Farms

Aug 11, 2014
United States Fish and Wildlife Service

The drought is bad enough… making streams run low and even dry in places. 

But its effects have been compounded along the Klamath River by illegal marijuana growing operations that divert water and cause streams to run dry artificially. 

The Yurok Tribe recently joined forces with law enforcement agencies from the local, state and federal level... to raid some of the illegal pot grows. 

The "New Approach" To Legal Marijuana In Oregon

Jul 15, 2014
United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Signatures are still being counted, but it appears nearly certain that Oregon voters will decide whether to legalize marijuana for personal use in the November election. 

New Approach Oregon is behind the campaign for the measure. 

It calls its approach "the new gold standard" for its careful construction: marijuana for users, taxes for government, prohibition for minors. 

Ashland Considers Pot Taxes

Jul 14, 2014
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Oregon law allows cities and counties to ban medical marijuana dispensaries until the spring of 2015. 

So, many of them did… more than 150 jurisdictions banned dispensaries, rather than deal with the legal complications of dealing with a substance illegal under federal law, but allowed by state law. 

Ashland stands apart; the city council is considering a package of regulations on marijuana--even recreational marijuana, if it is legalized. 

State+Fed+Local Pot Laws=Confusion

May 22, 2014
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You can forgive the casual observer for being confused about marijuana laws in our region. 

Oregon and California both have medical marijuana laws. 

Neighboring Washington allows pot for personal use. 

Oregon and California both have medical marijuana dispensaries, sort of. 

The Ashland City Council is following the lead of other Oregon cities, and considering a moratorium on medical marijuana dispensaries.  The town faces six dispensary applications and mounting neighborhood opposition.

The Mail Tribune reports the council will discuss a temporary moratorium tomorrow night, in a meeting open to the public.

People hoping to launch dispensaries in Oregon began submitting applications to the state on March 3 as part of a new medical marijuana regulatory system. Two applicants have received business licenses in Ashland so far.

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