Jefferson Monthly

Tuned In
4:11 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

The System We've Built

I just returned from a meeting of station managers from across the country who gathered to take stock of the public radio system and develop strategies to attract and engage the next generation of listeners. It’s always refreshing to step back from the churn of daily operations to view the bigger picture. As local stations, together with NPR and the other national producers and organizations, look to the future, it’s also pretty amazing to consider the system we’ve built together.

Read more
Jefferson Monthly Feature
3:59 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

The Rogue Valley Symphony: Behind The Scenes

A native of Bratislava, Slovakia, Martin Majkut was hired as conductor of the RVS orchestra in 2010.
Christopher Briscoe Photography

Violin cases and coats lay scattered on dozens of empty seats in the recital hall at Southern Oregon University.  Under the bright stage lights, dozens of musicians laugh and greet friends they haven't seen in months. 

The first rehearsal of the Rogue Valley Symphony's 2013-2014 season is about to begin.

Read more
Recordings
3:39 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Best Albums Of 2013

JPR music hosts take a stab identifying standout recordings of 2013.

Don Matthews | Classical Music Director & Host First Concert

Read more
Theatre
10:49 am
Fri November 1, 2013

The Heroine's Journey

Jesusa (Vivia Font), Manuela (Alejandra Escalante) and Tomasita (Sabina Zuniga Varela) discuss a radical course of action.
Jenny Graham

In her essay, A Room of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf imagines a gifted sister for Shakespeare and speculates on her fate. Unschooled, married as a teenager against her will, the young woman yearns to write plays so runs away to London only to find herself barred from work in the theatre. She winds up pregnant, and commits suicide.

Read more
Recordings
10:46 am
Fri November 1, 2013

Beautiful Melancholy

Nick Drake

I have been listening to music for as long as I can remember. My father was an accordion player of Italian folk songs and American country music since before I was born, and through the early years of my life there was always music and sing-alongs around the kitchen table with friends and family.

Read more
Jefferson Almanac
10:39 am
Fri November 1, 2013

The Cost Of A Free Lunch

Who wouldn’t love a free lunch? You seat yourself, let’s say, on a sun-dappled outdoor patio, choose among the many mouth-watering dishes, enjoy a glass or two of wine, and finally, full at last, get up and simply stroll away. No waiter pursues you, waving a bill. No guilty conscience disturbs your well-being. This establishment never charges. It’s a free lunch, every day.

Read more
Jefferson Monthly Feature
12:49 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Bronze Cowboys, Chocolate, And Wolves: Oregon's Little Switzerland

Nestled in a region known to some as "Oregon's Little Switzerland," the town of Joseph boasts a population of just over 1,000 residents.
josephdigital.com

The air smells of pine and cold when I finally arrive in Joseph, a small town in the northeast corner of Oregon, at 4 p.m. on a Friday afternoon in late spring. The peaks of the mountains in the Eagle Cap Wilderness west of downtown shine with snow even though it’s warm enough in the valley that I don’t need a jacket. I do a happy dance after I park at the motel. It’s taken me two airplane rides (via Washington and Idaho), one car rental, and a two-and-a-half-hour drive south from the airport in Lewiston, Idaho to get here from the western part of the state.

Read more
Tuned In
12:03 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Doubling Down On Live And Local

As public radio stations across the country attempt to navigate the brave new world of emerging media platforms there has been a new fervor to return to radio’s roots when radio was “live and local.”  Public radio in the U.S. has been built on a foundation of localism. Stations have always been locally (or regionally) owned and operated, and have worked hard to be more than just repeaters of nationally syndicated programming.  Creating local content unique to individual communities has always been an essential element of public radio’s mission.

Read more
EarthFix
4:51 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Aging Mobile Homes Burden The Grid And Their Owners

Charlotte White in her kitchen.
Amelia Templeton

If you walk into Charlotte White’s home, this is what you notice: colorful potholders hanging from the cabinets. A cat stretched out in a beam of sunlight. And the loud rattle of the washing machine.

“It spins off balance, because the floor is uneven, because it’s rotten,” White says.

In the hall and the bathroom, the floorboards feel spongy underneath her feet. White had to replace the kitchen floor, too, after it rotted out.

Read more
Recordings
4:43 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Music That Goes Bump In The Night

What I’ve always loved about my line of work is setting a mood. As a DJ, there’s nothing more satisfying than creating just the right soundtrack to make the moment complete, whether I’m spinning discs on the radio, playing tunes at a wedding, or just putting together the background music for a family celebration on my iPod. It’s more than just lining up all the popular hits for a particular demographic. It’s finding the right music to transport listeners to a particular place and time and emotional situation.

Read more
Inside The Box
4:40 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Frankenstein, Tinfoil Hats, And The NSA

Every new technology is a Frankenstein. Once it is created it is no longer in the control of its creator and once released into the world, it may behave in ways the creator never intended. That’s not to say that all new technologies are monsters; rather, it’s to point out the inherent duality in every new technology to be both good and bad. To put it simply: technology is not neutral.

Read more
Theatre
4:38 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Into The Woods

The Elizabethan Stage set by designer Michael Ganio and lighted by Mary Louise Geiger, with video projections by Alexander Nichols serves for three productions this season.

Two heroes of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival this summer are scenic designer Michael Ganio and projection designer Alexander Nichols, who manage with a single set to turn the ornery Elizabethan Stage into a space that splendidly serves all three outdoor productions.  In Cymbeline, the rocky, wooded terrain supports a primitive ancient Britain and the wilderness of Wales.  In David Farr’s The Heart of Robin Hood and Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, on the other hand, the scaffold of trees hovers over scenes of palace and town like an ironic reminder.  Enha

Read more
Jefferson Monthly Feature
4:04 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Hands Across The Watershed

Young Coho
Katrina Mueller USFWS, Pacific Region

They’re almost unfathomable, those images from a not-so-distant past: Streams thick with flashing bodies. Wagons overflowing with fish. Canneries on every major river. The salmon may be the iconic symbol of the Pacific Northwest, but in less than 150 years, the breathtaking bounty of its numbers has dwindled to wan runs supplemented by hatchery stock. In particular, several runs of Coho are in trouble, including the federally Threatened Southern Oregon/Northern California Coast population.

Read more
Jefferson Almanac
9:19 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Elegy: Apiaries And A War Of Aethetics

  1.

What do 50,000 dying bees look like?   A writhing scatter of black, swept by early morning brooms at a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, OR.   It is old news now, all the way back in June, but it sticks with me:  50,000 bees, feeding on the linden trees.  A neonicotinoid pesticide was applied to the trees to control aphids, which create a sticky secretion that was dripping on cars in the parking lot.

Read more
Jefferson Monthly Feature
3:38 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Both Sides of the Aisle

Provolt store owner Ruth Kealiher may call her business 'the redneck store,' but the many events there - like motorcycle swap meets and music festivals-bring the whole community together.
Christina Ammon

If a small town store is a reflection of a community, then looking around the Ruch Country Store, one gets the sense of the diverse set of people who live in the surrounding areas. On a small, recycled magazine rack, back issues of The New Yorker sit next to copies of American Rifleman. Pinned to the community board are various flyers. Housing needed for organic gardener one reads. Sagittarius, Ayurvedic dosha: vata. Enneagram personality type 3, vegan. Next to that: an advert for Medford BMX.

Read more
Tuned In
2:48 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

The New iJPR.org

By the time you read this I hope you’ve had an opportunity to explore JPR’s new website.  There are a number of features about the new site that I’d like to highlight.

Read more
Music Review
2:08 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

Sounds Of Summer

The late J.J. Cale.

I write this column as the oppressive heat of July and the smoke from local fires is hanging over the state of Jefferson, challenging my brain to summon up some of the music I've enjoyed recently. The first one that comes to mind is a wonderful documentary entitled You Want a Banjo. It‘s an enlightening history of the instrument, narrated by Steve Martin, and features many of the most influential banjo players.

Read more
Jefferson Almanac
11:01 am
Sun September 1, 2013

The Whistling Girl

The history we learn from text books is made up of stories selected by academics to explain and give shape to a civilization’s collective past. But history is much more than that. Beyond the textbook stories of political battles and sweeping social movements are the stories of ordinary people who make history in their own right by everyday acts of bravery and by standing up to injustice in the very communities in which they lived.

Read more
EarthFix
1:00 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Country’s First Tiny House Hotel Opens in Portland

The Pearl is the smallest of Caravan's three tiny houses at 90 square feet on the main floor. It is also the most modern with sleek countertops and dark wood finish. Each unit has unique features.
Toni Tabora-Roberts

Sure, tiny homes are adorable. But could you handle living in 120 square feet?

Portlanders Kol Peterson and Deb Delman think you should try it – if only for one night.

This past July, they opened the country’s first tiny house hotel.  The Caravan Tiny House Hotel consists of three tiny homes on what used to be a vacant lot in northeast Portland.

And, yes, they really are tiny.

Read more
Music Review
2:22 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Feasting On Blues

Linda Valori has sung for two popes.

  The diversity of "Blues" music continues to reveal itself in 2013, as new releases within the genre highlight a variety of styles and approaches.

Read more

Pages