immigration

arroya.org

The election just finished should provide all the evidence you need that people see immigration--legal and not--from a bunch of perspectives. 

Peg Bowden, a former nurse, withholds judgment of the people coming into the United States from Mexico.  She lives hard by the border in Arizona, and works helping people with basic survival needs in the harsh desert. 

Bowden offers a view of her tasks in her book: A Land of Hard Edges: Serving the Front Lines of the Border

The constant debates about what's wrong with the American immigration system make you wonder when it was right--if ever.

Political Scientist Dan Tichenor at the University of Oregon can take us back into the history of immigration law.  And he will, when he visits The Exchange with the first installment in what we envision as a continuing series highlighting research at the U of O. 

We call it CURIOUS/Research Meets Radio--with capital U and O. 

Tysto/Wikimedia

Even without any talk of Mexico paying for a wall, immigration was bound to be an issue in this year's election. 

Because it is in most elections. 

Causa Oregon is dedicated to securing the rights of immigrants, and Defend Oregon works in a similar vein, and more broadly on other issues that appear on the ballot. 

AIISF

Angel Island in San Francisco Bay served as something like a West Coast version of Ellis Island: an entry port for immigrants. 

Its past is also a shade darker, as the Island also played a part in excluding some people from immigration. 

The state of California just allocated money to finish the restoration of the immigration station.  It's a thrill to the Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation, which worked for the restoration and continues to collect the stories of immigrant families in its "Immigrant Voices" project. 

Wikimedia

We've been learning of late what happens when there's an even number of Supreme Court justices. 

When there's a tie, a lower court ruling stands.  And stand it did, in the case brought by Texas against President Obama's executive action to protect some undocumented immigrants from deportation. 

Which means deportation is now a stronger possibility for people who hoped to be able to stay in the country. 

Immigration lawyer John Almaguer is well-versed in the nuances of the laws now on the books. 

We continue our discussion of immigration into VENTSday, through the lens of the Supreme Court decision and the UK's departure from the EU.

Give us your thoughts on how, if at all, immigration should be handled differently. 

Topic two: Legal marijuana in Oregon reaches its first birthday; we want your impressions of success, failure, or meh?   

VENTSday removes the guests and puts listener comments front and center on The Exchange. Once a week, it's all about you... we plop a pair of topics on the table, post a survey online (see below), and open the phone lines and email box for live comments.

The topics can range from presidential politics to how you spend your days off. Got an observation or opinion? Share it with the State of Jefferson on VENTSday.

Northwest Women Writers Symposium

Reyna Grande garnered critical acclaim and awards for her first two novels. 

Then she turned her focus on herself for a memoir about her illegal immigration to the United States as a child, The Distance Between Us.  She is now a U.S. citizen, beneficiary of an amnesty program.

The book will be re-released in an edition for younger readers this fall, long after her appearance this weekend at Northwest Women Writers Symposium events in Eugene. 

Public Domain/Wikimedia

We get waves of stories about immigration, and the stories of children arriving in the United States from Central America, unattended, was several waves ago, in 2014. 

Which gives us a chance for some perspective on how those stories were portrayed in the media. 

University of Oregon journalism doctoral candidate Ricardo Valencia examined the coverage of the child immigrants in four American newspapers, taking note of the differences in sources, some Latino and some not. 

Penguin Press

Dan-El Padilla Peralta's family arrived in New York legally from the Dominican Republic.

But their visas lapsed, and they stayed.  Dan-El excelled in school, winning a private school scholarship and zooming to the top of his class. 

It was just before his salutatorian speech at Princeton that Dan-El revealed to the world that he was "undocumented," a story he tells in his book, Undocumented: A Dominican Boy’s Odyssey from a Homeless Shelter to the Ivy League.

University of Chicago Press

Environmentalists tend to tread carefully around the subject of population.

In a planet of finite resources and no place to throw things "away," overpopulation could devastate the Earth. 

Philip Cafaro has been talking for years about the intersection between environmentalism and population studies. 

In his latest book, "How Many Is Too Many?," Cafaro narrows the focus on immigration into the United States... and makes a rare progressive (not conservative) argument for reducing it. 

GeographBot/Wikimedia

The continuing deadlock in Congress leaves plenty of work unfinished. 

Federal government shutdown and debt ceiling aside, there are still important pieces of legislation languishing--immigration reform among them. 

oregonstate.edu

The terminology has changed a bit, and so have some of the approaches. 

The people once called "illegal aliens" are now generally called "undocumented immigrants," and laws are being written to accommodate the ones who came to the United States as children. 

California Immigrants Get New Protections

Oct 7, 2013

California Governor Jerry Brown has signed a bill that immigration advocates have long considered a top priority.

The measure, known as the "TRUST Act" is one of a number of bills backed by immigration advocates that the governor signed over the weekend. It's intended to protect undocumented immigrants arrested for minor crimes from being turned over to the federal government for possible deportation.

Brown vetoed the "TRUST Act" last year, citing concerns from law enforcement groups. This year, he worked with both sides to craft a compromise.