immigration

Northwest Women Writers Symposium

Reyna Grande garnered critical acclaim and awards for her first two novels. 

Then she turned her focus on herself for a memoir about her illegal immigration to the United States as a child, The Distance Between Us.  She is now a U.S. citizen, beneficiary of an amnesty program.

The book will be re-released in an edition for younger readers this fall, long after her appearance this weekend at Northwest Women Writers Symposium events in Eugene. 

Public Domain/Wikimedia

We get waves of stories about immigration, and the stories of children arriving in the United States from Central America, unattended, was several waves ago, in 2014. 

Which gives us a chance for some perspective on how those stories were portrayed in the media. 

University of Oregon journalism doctoral candidate Ricardo Valencia examined the coverage of the child immigrants in four American newspapers, taking note of the differences in sources, some Latino and some not. 

Penguin Press

Dan-El Padilla Peralta's family arrived in New York legally from the Dominican Republic.

But their visas lapsed, and they stayed.  Dan-El excelled in school, winning a private school scholarship and zooming to the top of his class. 

It was just before his salutatorian speech at Princeton that Dan-El revealed to the world that he was "undocumented," a story he tells in his book, Undocumented: A Dominican Boy’s Odyssey from a Homeless Shelter to the Ivy League.

University of Chicago Press

Environmentalists tend to tread carefully around the subject of population.

In a planet of finite resources and no place to throw things "away," overpopulation could devastate the Earth. 

Philip Cafaro has been talking for years about the intersection between environmentalism and population studies. 

In his latest book, "How Many Is Too Many?," Cafaro narrows the focus on immigration into the United States... and makes a rare progressive (not conservative) argument for reducing it. 

GeographBot/Wikimedia

The continuing deadlock in Congress leaves plenty of work unfinished. 

Federal government shutdown and debt ceiling aside, there are still important pieces of legislation languishing--immigration reform among them. 

oregonstate.edu

The terminology has changed a bit, and so have some of the approaches. 

The people once called "illegal aliens" are now generally called "undocumented immigrants," and laws are being written to accommodate the ones who came to the United States as children. 

California Governor Jerry Brown has signed a bill that immigration advocates have long considered a top priority.

The measure, known as the "TRUST Act" is one of a number of bills backed by immigration advocates that the governor signed over the weekend. It's intended to protect undocumented immigrants arrested for minor crimes from being turned over to the federal government for possible deportation.

Brown vetoed the "TRUST Act" last year, citing concerns from law enforcement groups. This year, he worked with both sides to craft a compromise.