Federal Government

State Department/Public Domain

It may not be a career for everyone, but working in the Foreign Service agrees with Lewis Lukens

He joined the State Department in the footsteps of his father, almost literally.  Lukens arrived in Senegal as U.S. Ambassador decades after his father worked in the embassy there. 

Lukens's job is now outreach and recruiting people interested in careers in the Foreign Service. 

Cacaphony/Wikimedia

The armed takeover of the vacant offices at Oregon's Malheur National Refuge draws attention from much of the country. 

And a few head scratches, too... over why it even happened, when the people at the center of the protest submitted to federal authority without protest. 

Media people on the scene outnumber the militants; Zoë Carpenter, the assistant Washington editor at The Nation, is among the people reporting on the takeover. 

Viking Press

Mike Lofgren is by no means the first person to say that our federal government is largely unresponsive to the will of the people. 

But he's one of the few to have spent a good deal of his career working inside the government, most recently as a Congressional budget committee staffer. 

Lofgren's book The Deep State examines the interconnections between people and organizations that lead to decisions far beyond the grasp of the American people. 

Basic Books

  Free speech in America?  You bet.  Free to shout "fire!" in a crowded public space?  Absolutely not.

See, right there the Constitution is not as absolute as some people make it out to be. 

The annual observance of Constitution Week is September 17-23, and we tack an observance of our own onto the end: Paulsen and Paulsen's The Constitution

The book gives history on perspective on our founding document, including shedding light on some of the major disagreements and perceptions about it. 

Some Federal Court Hearings Going Online

Jan 3, 2014
Keith Burtis/Flickr

Members of the public can now listen to hearings from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals online.

The court said Thursday it will offer online access to all of its proceedings beginning with its hearings next week in Pasadena. It's the first time a federal appeals court has provided the service.