environment

Forest Fires Make Snowpack Melt Faster

Sep 18, 2013

Charred forests left behind by wildfires make the mountain snowpack melt faster, according to a new study.Western rivers depend on the snowpack.

Study author, OSU doctoral student Kelly Gleason, says they found more snow fell in burned forests than in green ones. But the snow melted off twice as fast in burned forests, and was gone 23 days earlier. The reason was the black bits sloughing off the charred trees onto the snow intensified the heat from the sun.

Eighty percent of forest fires are in the snow zone.

guernicamag.org

We do not schedule guests for Wednesday at 8:30, because that's the time for VENTSday, your chance to vent (politely, please) on a pair of topics in the news.  We bring the topics, you bring the opinions. 

At The End Of The Sewer Pipe

Sep 10, 2013
humboldt.edu

As much as we'd like to think the contents of our toilets just go away when we flush, there is no such place as "away."  But communities around our region continue to look for ways to treat sewage and other waste products in ways that benefit the environment.  The efforts include the Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary and the Biocycle Farm of the Metropolitan Wastewater Management Commission in the Eugene area.

No Refuge For Ducks In Klamath Basin

Sep 6, 2013
fohn.net

The drought in the Klamath Basin this summer only worsened the situation of too many entities seeking use of the same water.  Somebody loses, and this year, the losers include ducks in the federal wildlife refuges in the area.  You'll hear the scope of the problem from the Fish and Wildlife Service.

Oregon Wild Campaigns Against Clearcuts

Sep 6, 2013
Tim Giraudier / Oregon Wild

Congress returns to business today, and a key item of business for the region is up for consideration.  Members of Congress from both parties in Oregon support a plan to divide the former O & C lands managed by the federal government, with a portion managed intensively for timber (and county revenue).  Opponents are mounting a campaign against the measure, under the banner "Oregon Home of the Clearcut."

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