Election 2016

On Friday, January 20th, NPR News will offer Special Coverage of Donald Trump's Presidential Inauguration.

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Republican Bob Strosser has claimed a seat on the Jackson County Board of Commissioners. 

The former Medford city council member held a large lead in early vote totals, 57 percent to 41 percent.  Democrat Jeff Thomas, a Medford school board member, trailed. Those numbers basically held through Wednesday morning, giving Strosser his win.

Strosser will replace Doug Breidenthal on the board in January.  Strosser defeated Breidenthal in the Republican primary in May.

Elsewhere on the Jackson County ballot:

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Josephine County's longstanding issues with public safety funding emerge unchanged from yet another election cycle. 

County voters rejected the latest version of a property tax levy that would have provided funding for sheriff's deputies, jail beds, and prosecutors.  Measure 17-74, like every public safety levy before it, went down to defeat.  In the first rounds of returns, the No votes led the Yes votes, 61 to 39 percent.

Josephine County is one of many Western Oregon counties that depended heavily on timber receipts from federal land to fill its general fund.  With little logging, the revenues crashed, and the county's property tax rate is too low to make up the difference.  Sheriff's patrols have been reduced to a few hours a day, with Oregon State Police picking up some of the criminal justice slack.  The levy loss ensures a continuation of that arrangement.

Chris Kaber leads the race for Klamath County Sheriff by 34 points. 

Kaber served on the Oregon State Police from 1987 to 2013. Since then he has worked as a polygraph examiner and private investigator, according to campaign filings. Early returns had Kaber with 66 percent of the vote, versus 32 percent for Steve Lewis, a Patrol Sergeant with the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office. 

As results come in across the country this evening, NPR reporters will be updating this breaking news blog in real time. The NPR Politics team, along with Member station reporters, will be providing live updates in the form of photo, video, commentary and analysis for both national and local contested races.

As you scroll through the live blog, come back to the top of the blog to populate new stories that have been posted since you’ve visited the page. Get a more in-depth look at each one of these races by clicking the “View Results” link in the top right of the blog. 

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At last, we have numbers.  Or will, by the time VENTSday begins on the morning AFTER the election. 

So you can guess what we'll be talking about.  From president to town council, from death penalty to mosquito tax, all election results are fair game on the super-sized edition of VENTSday. 

Grab a phone or email device while we dive into the pile of results--800-838-3760 or JX@jeffnet.org

Overjoyed?  Underwhelmed?  A little of each?  This is our chance to get a big community discussion going on the election results. 

On Tuesday night November 8th, JPR will broadcast wall-to-wall coverage of Election Night 2016.

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The only thing certain about the race for Jackson County Commissioner Position #2 is that it will result in a new commissioner. 

Incumbent Doug Breidenthal went down to defeat in the Republican primary in May. 

Former Medford City Councilor Bob Strosser won the primary and now faces Democrat Jeff Thomas in the November election. 

Thomas is currently a member of the Medford School District board. 

The Siskiyou/Moro Campaign/JPArt

The race for the Third Senate District in southern Oregon was triggered by the sudden death in August of Dr. Alan Bates. Bates, a Democrat, was widely respected, especially for his work on health care issues.

Now, Democrat Tonia Moro – an attorney -- and Republican Alan DeBoer -- an auto-dealer -- are each making the case that they are the best choice to succeed Bates in a race that has implications for the balance of power in Salem.

During the final presidential debate Wednesday night, NPR's team of journalists provided live fact-checking of the statements from both candidates. Below is a transcript, as well as NPR's comments.

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A new poll conducted for OPB shows Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and incumbent Gov. Kate Brown with commanding leads in their campaigns.

But it contains not-so-great news for the Democratic Party’s candidate for secretary of state and the coalition of progressive and labor groups pushing Measure 97.

Chris Phan/Wikimedia Commons

Some states beat Oregon to the punch with "early voting," but Oregon still stands as a pioneer, the first state to do all voting by mail. 

But you still have to register to vote, and the registration deadline is TODAY (October 18th; October 24th in California). 

Oregon will get a new secretary of state with this election, as appointee Jeanne Atkins is not running.  But she has been touring the state visiting with all 36 elections offices. 

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Southern Oregon's representation in the state legislature was already headed for a big change even before the sudden death of Sen. Alan Bates. 

Because Rep. Peter Buckley of Ashland had already announced his retirement from the House. 

Buckley had a huge impact beyond the district, as the chief budget-writer in the House. 

Pam Marsh of Ashland is the Democrat running to succeed Buckley.  Steve Richie is the Republican running (after Alan DeBoer opted to run for Senate instead). 

For a place with a lousy reputation, lots of people want to become members of the U.S. Senate. 

And four of them want to oust a long-entrenched Oregon incumbent to get there.  Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden is running for another six years in the November election. 

He faces challenges from Republican Mark Callahan, Libertarian Jim Lindsay, Shanti Lewallen of the Working Families Party, and former Ashland city councilor Eric Navickas, running as the Pacific Green Party candidate. 

They've all got ideas about what they'd like to do if elected. 

During the second Presidential Debate Sunday night, NPR's team of journalists provided live fact-checking of the statements from both candidates. Below is a transcript, as well as NPR's comments.

Dennis Richardson lost the last race for Oregon governor, only to watch his opponent resign a little more than a month into his term. 

Which set up another race for governor this year, but Richardson opted not to run. 

Instead, the former legislator from Central Point is running for the Secretary of State of Oregon. 

His opponent, Brad Avakian, currently holds statewide office as the Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor and Industries. 

The secretary of state has its own important roles, including that it is second in command to the governor... and the last secretary is the current governor. 

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By now, somebody in Oregon Congressional District Four must be thinking "you again?"  And it could be one of the two major-party candidates. 

Democratic incumbent Peter DeFazio is facing Republican challenger Art Robinson for the fourth straight election. 

It's hard to run against an incumbent for Congress; maybe harder in a district with Eugene and Corvallis on one end and Cave Junction and Brookings on the other. 

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Congressional races in Oregon tend to yield similar results, year after year. 

Members of the house tend to get reelected, and Rep. Greg Walden wants another term in Oregon's 2nd district, representing vast portions of rural Oregon. 

But this election year is a bit unusual, to say the least.  We continue our election interviews with a focus on the race in CD #2.  Greg Walden gets the floor first, Democratic challenger Jim Crary follows him. 

During the Vice Presential debate Tuesday night, NPR's team of journalists provided live fact-checking of the statements by both candidates. Below is a transcript, as well as NPR's comments.

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Most of Oregon's people live in the Willamette Valley.  So that's where many of the state's elected leaders come from. 

But Oregon has many people living far from the urban areas, with their own concerns about state government.  The Oregon gubernatorial candidates--Kate Brown and Bud Pierce--agreed to hold their first debate in Bend, focused on the issues of Rural Oregon. 

JPR is one of the partners in this first debate (Saturday, September 24th), with Emily Cureton representing JPR News on the panel. 

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