cannabis

The booming cannabis business may be good for many people, but there are other impacts to consider.  Like what happens to the people who want to keep growing food when the farms around them begin growing cannabis? 

The Rogue Valley Food System Network wanted an answer to that question, so it teamed up with Southern Oregon University to explore the issues. 

Environmental scientist Vincent Smith led the work; he presented it in a recent public lecture

rexmedlen/Pixabay

You've heard of eco-tourism, but are you ready for "canna-tourism?"  Would you consider staying at a "bud and breakfast?" 

These are business categories that could be possible if Humboldt County adopts the draft ordinance now before county supervisors. 

The general goal of the ordinance is to loosen up county regulations on marijuana-based businesses, allowing more types of businesses, and potentially more income. 

Will Houston covers cannabis for the Times-Standard in Eureka and for the Cannifornian

The Josephine County Board of Commissioners voted to adopt rules that ban cannabis farming on rural residential lots that are 5 acres or smaller.

The Grants Pass Daily Courier reports the county passed the new rules Wednesday night. The board did not determine when they will take affect. 

Opponents have threatened a lawsuit or an appeal to the Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals.

Jackson County Doubles Cannabis Violation Fines

Nov 20, 2017
MEDFORD MAIL TRIBUNE / File Photo

Jackson County is raising its maximum fine from $10,000 to $20,000 for code violations — in part because officials say owners of illegal marijuana grows are undeterred by the threat of a $10,000 fine. “A lot of people are being impacted by people who are ignoring our ordinances,” said Jackson County Commissioner Rick Dyer. Commissioners discussed the fines during a work session in October, then voted this month on whether to raise fines. Dyer and Commissioner Bob Strosser voted to increase a variety of minimum and maximum fines.

Austin Jenkins/Northwest News Network

Marijuana cultivation is estimated to use one percent of America’s electricity output. That’s enough juice to power 1.7 million average homes.

And as more states make the drug legal in some form, that power consumption is expected to soar. Northwest energy officials project cannabis grows will suck up three percent of the region’s power by 2035. 

Now, efforts are underway to get growers to reduce their energy use.