The World

News & Information: Mon • 1pm-2pm
  • Hosted by Marco Werman

PRI’s The World pioneered the new global journalism in America. Its unique editorial voice combines coverage of the day’s news, worldwide, with interviews and sound-rich features that examine the lives of people around the globe, and their connections to life in the U.S., giving listeners a global context for understanding America’s day.

Miami mourns a baseball star

10 hours ago
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Robert Mayer-USA TODAY Sports

Baseball is mourning the tragic loss of a star player.

Pitcher Jose Fernandez of the Miami Marlins died over the weekend in a boating accident.

The 24-year-old Fernandez was beloved by the team, and by the wider Miami community.

“He was one of us,” writes Miami Herald columnist Fabiola Santiago.

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Abdalrhman Ismail/Reuters

Even by the grim standards of Syria’s five-year-old civil war, the news from Aleppo has been particularly shocking in recent days. 

Syrian military forces and their Russian allies appear to be trying to wipe out whatever remains of the opposition in the northern city with an intense bombing campaign. 

We talk about war and human violence every day on the news program I host, The World. But, as experimental psychologist Steven Pinker reminded me recently, "You don't say where things are going right. What about all the parts of the world that used to be in flames, just consumed by war, but which are now at peace?"

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Tony XQ Chen/<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/tonyxqchen/22649724382/">Flickr</a> (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Put down the boba, Asian America. Those tapioca balls and sweetened drinks, when consumed too often, can cause major health problems.

One boba, milk tea with pearls, can have 36 grams of sugar — as much as a can of soda. It’s something public health advocates say too many people don’t realize. And that’s a problem because diabetes is on the rise, especially among Filipinos and Pacific Islanders.

Friday's Google Doodle was a tip of the hat to El Santo, the late professional wrestler who was known as the star of lucha libre in Mexico.

And even though he's been dead for over 30 years, El Santo remains an icon for many Mexicans. So here's what you need to know.

The name "El Santo" means "The Saint." For four decades he always wore a silver mask, and refused to reveal his identity. Legend has it he even wore the mask at home, and had a special one made so he could eat more comfortably.

It started out with stickers installed over street signs in Toronto, Canada. 

Printed on those stickers were indigenous names, either for the streets themselves or the area the streets run through. For three years, members of the Ogimaa Mikana project posted these informal reminders of what the First Nation peoples called these places long ago.

They created billboards, street signs and plaques to make the city's indigenous history and residents more visible. None of it was officially sanctioned.

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Courtesy of the John D. &amp; Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Ahilan Arulanantham was filing papers for a case he was working on, to provide counsel for children facing deportation, when the MacArthur Foundation called him.

His phone rang three or four separate times before he picked up.

“It was a very busy day,” says Arulanantham. “I was just wondering who this pesky caller was.”

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Mission Asset Fund

One of this year's recipients of the MacArthur Foundation's "genius grants" is Jose Quinonez.

He's being recognized for his work connecting low-income immigrants to mainstream financial services.

Sounds a little bland, but it's an absolutely critical service, and his is an absolutely genius solution. (Disclosure: The MacArthur Foundation also funds PRI.org reporting.)

Be like Norway. Do taco Friday.

Sep 23, 2016
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Alejandro Acosta/Reuters

If you need an idea for dinner this Friday night, The World has a Norwegian dish for you: Tacos. 

Yes. Tacos. Norwegians are crazy about them.

And every Friday night is taco night in Norway. People invite friends over and share a meal.

It's huge, as The Norwegian American reports

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Bridgette Burkholder

Humans have been eating meat since, well, before we were human.

But there are so many of us now eating so much meat that raising all those animals is having a big impact on the global environment, including the climate.

That has people around the world scrambling for meat substitutes, but something better than those dry and pasty veggie burgers.

Patrick Brown, founder and CEO of Impossible Foods, thinks he's hit the jackpot. His company invented a veggie burger that claims to taste, feel and even bleed like the real thing.

On September 15, at sunset in Arizona, a crowd gathered at the corner of a Chevron gas station called the Mesa Star. Like every year since 2002, Rana Sodhi hosted a memorial here for his brother, Balbir Singh Sodhi. Balbir was shot while planting flowers in front of his store on September 15, 2001 — four days after the 9/11 attacks.

A pro-Trump Egyptian's thoughts on the US election

Sep 23, 2016
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Wikimedia Commons

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi made headlines Wednesday when he declared that he has "no doubt" that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump would make a strong leader. But how do regular Egyptians feel?

Sisi, who has been criticized for his authoritarian leanings, met with both Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in New York on Monday.

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Caren Firouz/Reuters

The Afghan government has reached a peace deal with one its oldest enemies: Gulbuddin Hekmatyar and his Hezb-e-Islami group.

But Hekmatyar’s name is one that brings terror to many Afghans.

“His name, to me, means: blood,” says Qais Akbar Omar, author of "A Fort of Nine Towers: An Afghan Family Story."

Mohammed Badran was forced to flee his home in Syria when he was 19. But don't feel bad for him.

Earlier this week, Badran was a guest at the United Nations' Summit for Refugees and Migrants, where he made clear something that gets lost in coverage of the refugee crisis: A person fleeing their home is not a victim forever. Being a refugee isn't an identity, he says.

The central Italian town of Amatrice is still a mess of toppled buildings and rubble. Buried there are centuries worth of art and artifacts.

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Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters

For more than 50 years, Cuba was an enemy of the United States. But not every American has seen Cuba as a threat.  

“You know, I tell folks all the time, I wake up every morning worried about something, but being invaded by Cuba is not one of them,” says Larry Wooten, president of the North Carolina Farm Bureau.

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Courtesy Project Runway

Fashion designer Roberi Parra is familiar with widespread shortages of food, supplies, and medicine. But as a contestant on this season's "Project Runway," he's a world away from his hometown of Caracas, Venezuela. 

The show's first episode featured a surprise challenge: The hosts of the series welcome the designers at a launch party. The designers are then a bit startled to learn that the decor for the party will also serve as materials for their looks.

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Reuters/U.S. Air Force/Staff Sgt. Joely Santiago/Handout&nbsp;

The completion of a US weapons deal with Israel worth $38 billion clears the way for two of Israel's Arab neighbors to buy US fighter jets.

Qatar wants to buy 36 Boeing F-15 fighter jets. Kuwait has been waiting to buy 24 F/A-18E/F Super Hornets. “Those have been on hold for years now,” says journalist Dan De Luce, who follows defense matters for Foreign Policy.

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Reuters

The murderers struck in the heart of Washington's Embassy Row.  

Four decades ago today, former Chilean diplomat Orlando Letelier and Ronni Moffitt, his assistant, were killed when a remote-controlled bomb taped beneath their vehicle detonated.

Letelier had been living in exile in Washington, after serving in the administration of Chile's socialist President Salvador Allende.

When Gen. Augusto Pinochet led a coup that ousted Allende in 1973, Letelier was among the first to be arrested and tortured by the new regime. 

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BBC/Wietske Burema

The BBC’s Lyse Doucet has covered the war in Syria since it began five long years ago. So when happenstance found Doucet in her native Canada, she heard about a picnic being held for re-settled refugees from that savage conflict.

The picnic, on Sunday, was in a park in the Leslieville neighborhood of Toronto. Doucet went along with her team, and was doing interviews when a child ran up and asked her name. As soon as she did, a group of children started calling out to her.

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