The Takeaway

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  • Hosted by John Hockenberry

A daily newsmagazine featuring unique conversations with both news makers and diverse voices.

How millennials may one day — soon — upend the political landscape

Jun 10, 2016
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Yuri Gripas/Reuters

Back in 2008, a new youthful candidate named Barack Obama electrified young voters. Eight years later, a not-so-young candidate, but still new to the nation, has done the same thing. We’re talking about Senator Bernie Sanders, of course.

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John HeftiUSA TODAY Sports

It's Game 5 of the Stanley Cup playoffs, and the Pittsburgh Penguins have a commanding lead over the San Jose Sharks. The Sharks, playing in the first Cup finals in their team's history, are down three games to one. The Penguins have been stellar in this series so far, with star Sidney Crosby itching for his second Stanley Cup victory.

Now, if you've watched any hockey, you'll know how announcers typically call a goal: Yell the name of the player, and let the celebratory horn carry on. 

Disappointed, not surprised: Stanford and American rape culture

Jun 8, 2016
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Noah Berger/Reuters file photo

He was once a champion swimmer at one of America’s most prestigious universities, but now Brock Allen Turner is known the world over as a convicted rapist.

Back in March, a jury found the 20-year-old guilty on three felony counts for raping an unconscious woman at Stanford University in early 2015. Two fellow students called the police after they saw Turner thrusting on top of the comatosed woman behind a dumpster. The crime he was convicted of carried a maximum sentence of 14 years in prison, and the prosecution asked for six.

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Yoichi Robert Okamoto/White House

Today marks the 50th anniversary of Senator Robert F. Kennedy's "Ripple of Hope" speech. Delivered at the University of Cape Town on June 6, 1966, during the height of apartheid; most believe RFK's "Ripple of Hope" address was the greatest speech of his life.

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Carlos Barria/Reuters

For more than two years, the residents of Flint, Michigan, complained about the taste and smell of their tap water, of skin rashes, and hair loss with little response from officials. Now, much of the world knows of the lead-tainted water that coursed through Flint's pipes, and of the thousands of community members who have elevated levels of lead in their blood.

A history of accidental shootings in the US

Jun 2, 2016
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Daniel LeClair/Reuters

Back in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries, American newspapers regularly carried columns that highlighted “melancholy accidents,” or unfortunate accounts of firearm accidents and gun deaths. For example, in July 1844, The Baltimore Sun ran this brief with the headline, “Shot by Accident”:

How science and counterterrorism are reinventing US police interrogations

May 27, 2016
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Lucy Nicholson

You’ve seen it in nearly every police movie. There’s a small, smoke-filled room, and a single bare lightbulb shines down from the ceiling. Two overworked and overtired detectives assume the roles of good cop and bad cop, and they break down a suspect with psychological games until he cracks.

As it turns out, this clichéd Hollywood script has roots in the real world.

After two weeks of massive lines at airport security checkpoints across the country, the Transportation Safety Administration has replaced Kelly Hoggan, the TSA's top security official.

Democrats splintering over DNC chief?

May 23, 2016
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Jim Young/Reuters

For months, the Republican Party seemed to be splintering apart as Donald Trump inched closer to the GOP nomination. But now it’s the Democratic Party that is struggling to unify.

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Courtesy of Lachowitz and Fonville

North Carolina's controversial HB2 ordinance — commonly referred to as the "bathroom bill" — prohibits transgender people from using public restrooms that correspond with their gender identities. The law has tangible consequences for the bodies and souls of transgender people in the state, says Erica Lachowitz, a transgender woman in Charlotte.

The advancement of A.I. has the potential to fundamentally change how we solve problems

May 19, 2016

"If you control the code, you control the world," security adviser Marc Goodman said in a 2012 a TED Talk. But what happens when humans no longer control the code?

America's homeless community is growing

May 18, 2016

Housing affordability and availability in big cities like New York and San Francisco are often viewed as issues of the working, middle and upper classes. But there is an entirely separate portion of urban population that gets left out.

report from the US Conference of Mayors shows that homelessness is on the rise in America's biggest cities. Demands for emergency food assistance are going unmet, and housing facilities are turning away the needy.

Venezuela's economic troubles have become a full-blown crisis

May 17, 2016

For the last three years, Venezuela has been in the throes of an economic crisis, and things have reached a boiling point. Over the weekend, President Nicolás Maduro declared a 60-day state of emergency, claiming there were plots from within Venezuela and from the United States to undermine his authority.

Observers say the president initiated the state of emergency to thwart calls for a recall referendum.

Iconic feminist pioneer Gloria Steinem has been an outspoken champion of women's rights for more than five decades, and at age 82, she's showing no signs of slowing down.

Steinem is the host and executive producer of the new VICELAND series "Woman," which traces the link between violence against women and social instability across the globe.

If Donald Trump were a woman

Apr 30, 2016
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Joe Skipper/Reuters

Earlier this week, Donald Trump accused Hillary Clinton of playing “the woman card.”

“If Hillary Clinton were a man, I don’t think she'd get 5 percent of the vote,” he said during a primary night victory speech at Trump Tower.

That got me wondering. What would the Trump life experience and campaign look like if he were a woman? A few thoughts come to mind:

  1. If Trump were a woman, he would have to break the greatest glass ceiling in American politics without being too demanding, loud, unladylike, or smart.

Veteran: Trump could throw the military into 'crisis'

Apr 29, 2016
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Aaron Josefczyk/Reuters

On Wednesday, Donald Trump attempted to lay out an "America first" foreign policy plan at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC.

“Our foreign policy is a complete and total disaster: No vision, no purpose, no direction, no strategy,” Trump said.

Trump departed from his off-the-cuff style. With the help of a teleprompter, he laid out his vision for America’s economic and national security, and the buildup of the US military.

California prisons struggle to adapt to desegregation

Apr 27, 2016
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The WORLD Channel/via The Takeaway

Prisons all over America are seeing a new era of rapid, radical change. But things were different just a decade ago.

The tricky business of love, race and white privilege

Apr 26, 2016

Is love colorblind? According to the US Census Bureau, there are more than 5.3 million interracial and interethnic couples in the United States, and that number continues to grow.

Though the modern couple is growing more and more diverse, conversations about race and relationships can still be complicated.

Gov. Jan Brewer: Trump is a 'breath of fresh air'

Apr 21, 2016
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Sam Mircovich/Reuters

Donald Trump was counting on New York primary voters to boost his delegate count, and they didn't fail to deliver: The billionaire businessman won over 60.5 percent of Republican voters on Tuesday night.

Though Trump is ahead in the delegate count, if he does not secure the nomination in the first round at his party's convention in Cleveland this summer, the delegates he's won are free to vote for another candidate in the second round.

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Gary Cameron/Reuters

For decades, US presidents and Saudi Arabian kings have welcomed one another to their respective homes in Riyadh and Washington. The Saudis have provided the US with a reliable and cheap flow of oil since the 1970s, and have supported US policies in the Middle East for years — from the containment of Iran to support in Syria today.

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