Science Friday

News & Information: Sat • 1PM-3PM
  • Hosted by Ira Flatow

Yes, we know it's on Saturday but they wouldn't change the name of the show for us ... we asked.  But we think it's a great program for Saturdays. Covering the outer reaches of space to the tiniest microbes in our bodies, Science Friday is the trusted source for news about science, technology, and other cool stuff. Each week host Ira Flatow mixes it up with people in the know and those who want to be.  It's brain fun, for curious people.

Finding an Earthly home for the Thirty Meter Telescope

2 hours ago
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Courtesy TMT International Observatory

Named for the diameter of its mirror, the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT, for short) will some day see 10 to 100 times farther in the sky than existing telescopes — far enough, scientists hope, to glimpse exoplanets and some of the oldest objects in the universe.

Baby Boxes, Singing Fish, And E-DNA

Jun 24, 2017

Caught On Video: How DNA Replicates

Jun 24, 2017

Getting To Know The Placenta

Jun 24, 2017

Kepler Unveils A New Crop Of Exoplanets

Jun 24, 2017

Tired of jogging? There’s an exosuit for that.

Jun 20, 2017
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<a href="https://unsplash.com/photos/Apj4nSemkzk">Clem Onojeghuo</a> via <a href="https://unsplash.com/license">Unsplash</a>. Image cropped.

Talk about suiting up for a jog — researchers have developed an exosuit that helps runners use less energy.

The ensemble is no stiff, Iron Man-style exoskeleton — it looks more like a pair of belted spandex shorts. In the study, recently published in Science Robotics, researchers say that wearing the suit can cut the metabolic cost of a treadmill run by 5.4 percent.

For fish, the good and bad of warming ocean waters

Jun 19, 2017

As ocean temperatures rise, what will happen to the fish we eat?

According to a recent study published in “Progress in Oceanography,” some fish species will thrive in warmer waters — and others, not so much.

Using a detailed climate model and historical observation data, researchers at NOAA and The Nature Conservancy modeled the shifting thermal habitats of over 50 species along the Atlantic coast, from North Carolina to the Gulf of Maine.

How to make bionic limbs feel more natural

Jun 18, 2017
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Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters

When you flex your bicep, your muscle sends information to your brain, allowing you to feel your muscle contract without even having to glance at it. But if you have a bionic limb, you don’t get that same sensory feedback.

“When I move my bionic ankles, I don’t feel the movement of the ankles, and when the torque increases on my bionic ankle joints, I don’t feel that torque,” says Hugh Herr, who co-directs the Center for Extreme Bionics at MIT, and whose legs are amputated below the knee.

Just how much science is in forensic science?

Jun 17, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/westmidlandspolice/7170656948/">West Midlands Police</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>

On TV crime shows, forensic science always just manages to pinpoint the criminal in the span of a televised hour — and with 100 percent accuracy. But in real life, forensic science doesn’t always work so smoothly.

The Mindset For A Milkshake

Jun 17, 2017

Can The Great Lakes Stay Great?

Jun 17, 2017

The story of Magnus Hirschfeld, the ‘Einstein of sex'

Jun 14, 2017
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Via Undiscovered

Decades before Alfred Kinsey developed his scale for human sexuality, there was Magnus Hirschfeld — a doctor who dedicated his career to proving that homosexuality was natural.

Hirschfeld’s reasoning was simple: In turn of the 20th century Germany, where he lived, a law called Paragraph 175 made so-called “unnatural fornication” between men punishable by prison time.

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