Living On Earth

News & Information: Sat • 10am-11am
  • Hosted by Steve Curwood

An in-depth exploration of the latest scientific, political and social elements related to environmental change. 

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After major flooding in 1998, China introduced the Natural Forest Conservation Program, a logging ban to help protect against erosion and rapid runoff. A recent study in Science Advances of 10 years of satellite data found significant recovery in some Chinese forests.

But it's not all good news. Andrés Viña, an author of the paper, says this reforestation is probably shifting deforestation elsewhere.

Climate change is a huge threat to our national parks

Jun 19, 2016
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Erik Salard/Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

Climate change is not just incinerating boreal forests — it’s also presenting new challenges for one of America’s most beloved icons — its national parks.

The director of the National Park Service, John Jarvis, recently called climate disruption the single greatest threat to the integrity of the parks that has ever been experienced. And this is causing a wholesale rethink of planning for the future of the parks.

A new way to clean the environment?

Jun 19, 2016
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Ari Daniel

In the quest to mend the ecological damage and imbalances humans are causing, many enterprising scientists are turning to the endlessly inventive natural world — for example bacteria that can metabolize oil spilled into the sea, or plants that take up toxic compounds. And such amazing life forms are everywhere.

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Tambako the JaguarFlickr CC BY-ND 2.0

Mountain Lions have been considered extinct in the Eastern United States for decades, but there is one lion who trekked from his home in the Dakotas to just a few miles outside of New York City.

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Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta

The wildfires that swept the Canadian city of Fort McMurry earlier this year are now classified as the biggest natural disaster to ever hit Canada in terms of dollars. Some $6 billion worth of property went up in smoke.

In this era of global climate change, the far north is the fastest warming part of the world, with fires doubling in size over the past 50 years. People are now beginning to rethink how to protect forest communities like Fort McMurray.

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Colin Harris/Flickr 

During his business career and, more recently, while running for president, Donald Trump has derided the science of climate change. He has even called it a “hoax” created by the Chinese. But that hasn’t stopped him from invoking the dangers of climate change in a bid to protect one of his golf courses from the dangers of sea level rise.

Environmental activists are urging the US government to “keep it in the ground” — that is, to ban any new leases of public lands to fossil fuel companies. The industry already leases more than 67 million federally-controlled acres. A new study details the benefits that could be achieved from this policy.

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 Joe Brusky/Flickr 

A majority of Americans — about 64 percent — say they are worried about climate change, according to a recent Gallup poll. At the same time, other polling and survey data show that our public school systems are teaching students almost nothing about it.

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Reuters

Liberal and conservative disagreement on climate change and the environment reflects the hyper-partisan times we live in. But it doesn't have to be that way, new research suggests.

According to eco-psychologist Christopher Wolsko of Oregon State University, environmental issues are expressed in the media and by advocacy groups largely within a framework of liberal values, which tends to exclude conservatives who might otherwise embrace the issues.

China Grows More Trees

Jun 4, 2016

After major flooding in 1998, China introduced a national logging ban called the Natural Forest Conservation Program to help protect against erosion and rapid runoff. A recent study in Science Advances of 10 years of satellite data found significant recovery in some Chinese forests. But Andrés Viña, an author of the paper, explains to host Steve Curwood that this reforestation in China is probably shifting deforestation elsewhere. (published June 3, 2016)


From Living on Earth ©2016 World Media Foundation

Coping with Massive Forest Fires

Jun 4, 2016

Fire is natural in the northern boreal forests, but Canadian wildfire expert Mike Flannigan says it has become more prevalent with global warming and puts more communities at risk of massive blazes, like the one that ravaged Fort McMurray in Alberta recently. Flannigan tells host Steve Curwood what communities and homeowners in the midst of fire-prone forests need to do to minimize their risk. (published June 3, 2016)


From Living on Earth ©2016 World Media Foundation

Living on Earth: June 3, 2016

Jun 4, 2016

Coping with Massive Forest Fires / Beyond the Headlines / Climate Change and the National Parks / China Grows More Trees / Iron-eating Bacteria / Heart of a Lion


From Living on Earth ©2016 World Media Foundation

Climate Change and the National Parks

Jun 4, 2016

The director of the National Parks recently said that climate disruption represents the greatest threat to the integrity of the park system. National Park Service scientist John Gross tells host Steve Curwood how park managers are rethinking many of their management strategies. (published June 3, 2016)


From Living on Earth ©2016 World Media Foundation

Iron-eating Bacteria

Jun 4, 2016

We revisit a report by Ari Daniel, who traveled into the field with microbiologists to report on some strange bacteria that consume iron and may help filter water in the future. (published June 3, 2016)


From Living on Earth ©2016 World Media Foundation

Beyond the Headlines

Jun 4, 2016

In this week’s trip beyond the headlines, Peter Dykstra talks to host Steve Curwood about a possible upgrade to the giant panda’s endangered status in China, state officials in Texas trying to hide photos of oil spills caused by recent flooding, the Australian government trying to obscure coral bleaching, and the Arsenic Act of 1851 in England, one of the earliest laws on toxic substances. (published June 3, 2016)


From Living on Earth ©2016 World Media Foundation

Heart of a Lion

Jun 4, 2016

Mountain Lions have been considered extinct in the Eastern U.S. for decades, but one trekked from his home in the Dakotas to just a few miles outside of New York City. Host Steve Curwood talks with author William Stolzenburg, whose new book, Heart of a Lion, carefully documents this creature’s extraordinary two-thousand-mile journey. (published June 3, 2016)


From Living on Earth ©2016 World Media Foundation

Garden in the Woods is one of Boston’s local treasures. It aims to recreate the diversity of the region’s different habitats, from bogs to ponds, floodplains to sand plains. 

Heart of a Lion

Jun 3, 2016

Mountain Lions have been considered extinct in the Eastern U.S. for decades, but one trekked from his home in the Dakotas to just a few miles outside of New York City. Host Steve Curwood talks with author William Stolzenburg, whose new book, Heart of a Lion, carefully documents this creature’s extraordinary two-thousand-mile journey. (published June 3, 2016)

Beyond the Headlines

Jun 3, 2016

In this week’s trip beyond the headlines, Peter Dykstra talks to host Steve Curwood about a possible upgrade to the giant panda’s endangered status in China, state officials in Texas trying to hide photos of oil spills caused by recent flooding, the Australian government trying to obscure coral bleaching, and the Arsenic Act of 1851 in England, one of the earliest laws on toxic substances. (published June 3, 2016)

Living on Earth: June 3, 2016

Jun 3, 2016

Coping with Massive Forest Fires / Beyond the Headlines / Climate Change and the National Parks / China Grows More Trees / Iron-eating Bacteria / Heart of a Lion

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