The Jefferson Exchange

News & Information: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and newsmakers from around the region and beyond. It airs on JPR's News & Information service. Choose that service from the stream above or find your station here.

Participate in the live program by calling 800-838-3760 or emailing JX@jeffnet.org

Public Domain/Wikimedia

The "silver tsunami" is well underway.  Children born during the American baby boom are all in their mid-50s and older now, many looking for places to spend their time after retirement. 

Does a "senior center" even appeal to them?  The country has plenty of them, and they provide a variety of services. 

Oregon's State Unit on Aging keeps tabs on many programs available to seniors. 

Wikimedia

Maybe the details become murky over time, but just the name of America's most complicated war says volumes: Vietnam. 

58,000 people died fighting for the United States, and the country itself divided sharply over the war, leaving a permanent scar. 

Elizabeth Partridge protested the war as a teenager in Berkeley; she offers an overview of the war to a new generation in the lavishly-illustrated book Boots On The Ground: America's War In Vietnam

boblog111.com

Josh Gross is a musician, but we dare not ask who his influences are.  We might be listening all day. 

Safe to say that Josh loves music in many forms, and he gets to demonstrate it by making his own AND by covering the music of others in his work for the Rogue Valley Messenger

We plug Josh into the Exchange once a month in a segment we call Rogue Sounds. 

Brian Turner via Flickr

Our society oscillates in our approach to criminal justice, between punishment and rehabilitation. 

The concept of "restorative justice" takes rehabilitation a step further.  It involves healing the harm done by crime, when possible, and re-integrating offenders into society, sometimes with face-to-face meetings between people on both ends of a criminal act. 

The Resolve Center for Dispute Resolution and Restorative Justice in Medford (formerly Mediation Works) organized the upcoming Northwest Justice Forum.  Restorative justice is central to the mission of the forum. 

U of California

Latinos are California's largest single minority group.  But Latinos can be hard to find among the faculty and administration of California's public colleges, both two- and four-year. 

And that's not the only group under-represented.  69% of students are diverse, but 60% of college faculty and senior leadership are white. 

The Campaign for College Opportunity documents the trends in a recent report

Alexander Novati/Wikimedia

The imprisoning of Japanese-Americans in prison camps during World War II is an enduring stain on the country.  We still struggle to understand the actions and motivations of the time. 

Much of the attention focuses on people leaving their homes and living in the camps. 

But what happened after they were released?  That's the approach taken in the book Life After Manzanar by Naomi Hirahara and Heather Lindquist. 

People released from camps got 25 dollars and a bus ticket. 

Acting may be fun and rewarding work, but it requires a lot of the actor; preparation, audition, rehearsal, and more. 

Theatre professionals Jackie Apodaca and Michael Kostroff shared an advice column for working or nearly-working actors for a decade in "Backstage," a trade paper.  They compiled some of their best work in the book Answers from "The Working Actor": Two Backstage Columnists Share Ten Years of Advice

Jackie Apodaca is a professor in the theatre department at Southern Oregon University.  Michael Kostroff is an actor and a teacher as well. 

Tracking The Extinct Giants Of Oregon

Apr 30, 2018
University of Oregon

Giants once roamed the Earth in our region.  Mammoths and mastodons, elephant-like creatures, were common until humans hunted them to extinction. 

Evidence of their presence can still be found, including mammoth tracks on a dry lake bed in Lake County (Oregon).  University of Oregon paleontologist Gregory Retallack has been investigating the tracks, which indicate mammoths traveling in a group (and one might have been limping). 

Wikimedia

We're urged to "think globally, act locally," but climate change is still a massive thing to wrap our minds around. 

How DO we express our concerns at the local level in ways that make a difference?  Mary DeMocker, co-founder of the Eugene chapter of 350.org, has a few ideas for you.  She is the author of The Parents’ Guide to Climate Revolution: 100 Ways to Build a Fossil Free Future, Raise Empowered Kids, and Still Get a Good Night's Sleep

You might tell from the title that the book is both serious and lighthearted. 

Tanya Dedyukhina, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=52749724

Woolly Mammoths and another First Friday Arts segment headline another full week of Jefferson Exchanges, April 30-May 4.

What follows is a partial list of confirmed guests; content may change without notice.

Monday, April 30, 8 a.m. — Sexual Harassment Common In Restaurant Business    

Leslie McClurg/Capital Public Radio

Lots of us work in restaurants at some point in our lives.  And at the moment, it's one of the fastest-growing sectors of the economy. 

Also one of the most likely to spur complaints of sexual harassment.  The Restaurant Opportunities Centers United (ROC United) tracks issues for restaurant workers, and has plenty to report on the prevalence of sexual harassment. 

João Felipe C.S./Public Domain

Federal farm bills, are, by nature, monsters.  They contain federal attitudes toward farming and food in thousands of avenues, from crop insurance to food stamps. 

What you might NOT expect in a farm bill is a discussion of suicide.  But there's a call for attention to mental health care in our rural areas; by some counts, farmers commit suicide at several times the rate of the general population. 

Michael Rosmann is a clinical psychologist and a farmer, providing his services through AgriWellness, Inc. and Ag Behavioral Health

Did you leave your brolly in the boot of your car?  If the phrase makes immediate sense, you might be British. 

We share a language with the United Kingdom, but there are many differences in the version we speak in the United States. 

Lynne Murphy is perfectly situated to research and write about the differences, being from here and living there, in England.  Her blog "Separated by a Common Language" grew into a book, The Prodigal Tongue

siskiyousingers.org

They may be beautiful, but they came from ugly circumstances.  Spirituals are, at heart, songs from slavery in America. 

And Ashland-based Siskiyou Singers present a program of them in two concerts this weekend, "Who’ll Be a Witness: The Power of the American Spiritual." 

Performances Saturday and Sunday will be narrated by Eileen Guenther, who wrote In Their Own Words: Slave Life and the Power of Spirituals

Oregon Voter's Pamphlet

The occupant of the Oregon State Senate District 3 seat will change this fall, for the second time in a little more than two years.

Alan Bates died in office in the late summer of 2016; Alan DeBoer won the special election for a two-year term but opted not to run again.

A flock of candidates from both parties filed for the open seat. Today we visit with the two Republicans filed, Curt Ankerberg and Jessica Gomez

Pixabay

Any young person despairing of figuring out the right direction in life should consider a road trip.  It works for many people, and there are even guides to the process. 

Those include Roadmap: The Get-It-Together Guide for Figuring Out What to Do with Your Life.  The book is an outgrowth of the documentary series "Roadtrip Nation." 

Co-author Nathan Gebhard visited when the book came out three years ago. 

Underground History: Balloon Bombs Remembered

Apr 25, 2018
Michael (a.k.a. moik) McCullough, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=58371763

The fears of a Japanese attack on the mainland United States actually came true during the second World War.  But no one knew it at the time. 

The discovery of a balloon bomb near Bly, Oregon in the spring of 1945 resulted in the deaths of six people. 

That case and others were kept under wraps by government censors at the time. 

Our Underground History segment with the archaeologists of the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology (SOULA) focuses on the balloon bombings this month. 

Oregon Voter's Pamphlet

The occupant of the Oregon State Senate District 3 seat will change this fall, for the second time in a little more than two years. 

Alan Bates died in office in the late summer of 2016; Alan DeBoer won the special election for a two-year term but opted not to run again.  A flock of candidates from both parties filed for the open seat. 

Today we visit with Democrats Julian Bell, Athena Goldberg, Jeff Golden, and Kevin Stine

Global Citizen Year

Erik Oline admits he knew next to nothing about Senegal when he graduated from Ashland High School a year ago. 

That changed quickly, as Erik moved to Senegal for his "gap year," signing up with Global Citizen Year

He recently returned from his eye-opening experience in Western Africa, where he learned much more than the name of the capital (Dakar). 

Kim Hansen, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7185913

The ocean is full of energy, but can we capture it for use in creating electricity?  Lots of people think we can, including the people at the Redwood Coast Energy Authority

RCEA recently announced efforts to pursue a floating wind farm, to capture wind energy offshore. 

This is a project the Pacific Ocean Energy Trust has been working toward for several years now. 

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