The Jefferson Exchange

News & Info: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook.

Or suggest a guest for The Exchange.

Wikimedia

 A culture like ours that values youth and vitality does not talk easily about death. 

Which might make death all the more surprising and hard to deal with when it arrives. 

The concept of the "death café" gives people a chance to gather in a relaxing setting to just talk about death. 

Ashland Death Café meets several times a year to provide that opportunity. 

Perseus Books

 It's no accident that Native Americans revere the coyote as a trickster, and Warner Brothers named a cartoon character Wile E. Coyote.  It's just observation. 

This most clever of animals (okay, maybe not the cartoon one) has constantly confounded the efforts of humans to fence it in, knock it down, and wipe it out.  Not only do coyotes survive in their traditional habitats, they have migrated into new surroundings, including Central Park in New York, among many places. 

Dan Flores traces the battle between human and dog-like creature in Coyote America

Horsetown Clear Creek Preserve

The sign says BLM, but the Horsetown Clear Creek Preserve near Redding includes 27 acres of land owned by a private non-profit group. 

The group, which bears the name of the preserve--call it HCCP--just won an award from the Bureau of Land Management for two decades of solid work. 

HCCP volunteers perform preservation work, provide educational programs to help young people better understand nature and our relationship to it, and other duties that maximize the use and enjoyment of the preserve. 

Wikimedia

Not a corner of the country is untouched by the massacre in Orlando. 

The mixture of rage and sadness and bewilderment at the killing of 50 people will be expressed in many ways.

Southern Oregon Pride (SOPride) joins forces with other groups in a vigil on the Ashland Plaza Monday evening at 6:30.  A second vigil is planned for "the bricks," the courtyard at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, at 8:30.

HarperCollins

It's one of the sadder stories in broadcasting history: the first FM radios were rendered completely useless when the federal government MOVED the entire FM band to a different range of frequencies. 

First and most obvious question: why?  The surprising answer and the personalities involved are revealed in Scott Woolley's book The Network

Money, power, egos... all figured in the development of the industry we know and love. 

University of Oregon

The University of Oregon took the unusual step of ordering an external review of the "Greek" system on campus, fraternities and sororities. 

The review confirmed many of the issues already being addressed by University leadership.  Among them: that binge drinking, sexual assault, and hazing are still prevalent within fraternities and sororities, with peer pressure to not report serious issues. 

Dr. Robin Holmes is the Vice President of Student Life at UO; she ordered the review. 

Wikimedia

Sexual assault on college campuses was already a heavily discussed topic.  Then came the Brock Turner case at Stanford. 

Turner admitted raping an unconscious woman behind a dumpster after a campus party; blamed drinking, peer pressure, and promiscuity... and got six months in jail. 

Now calls for the judge's removal are being made, while universities work to establish policies on handling sexual assault causes. 

Stanford law professor and sociologist Michele Landis Dauber, who is a member of a committee seeking the judge's recall, shares her thoughts on what should be done in such cases. 

University of Oregon psychology professor Jennifer Freyd also weighs in. 

Penguin Random House

Philippe Sands is a writer and international lawyer who works to curtail and punish mass murder by whichever term is used: genocide or crimes against humanity. 

And the author's stint in a Ukrainian university led him down the trail of two men, both lawyers who studied at the same university. 

They both took radically different pathways to get to the same place: a body of law to prosecute the likes of the Nazis who committed genocide in World War II.  East West Street is Sands' book. 

George Kramer/preserveoregon blog

Girl Scouts of several generations formed fond memories of summer days and nights spent at Camp Low Echo at Lake of the Woods in Klamath County.

But the scout days are part of history now; Camp Low Echo closed a few years ago, prior to a renovation and re-use. 

Karen and Sid DeBoer bought it through their charitable foundation and plan to donate it to the Ashland Family YMCA

Public Domain

We can take our surroundings for granted, so it's good every so often to step back and gaze in appreciation.

That's the basic idea behind the Hathkapasuta River Celebration, coming to the Illinois Valley (Near Cave Junction) this weekend. 

It gives visitors a chance to celebrate the rivers and forests that are such critical parts of our region. 

Tim  Leyba and Suzanne Vautier of CEEN, the Cultural and Ecological Enhancement Network, are organizers for the event. 

Penguin Random House

Ask anyone who lived through the 1960s about the most turbulent year of the decade, and they might say 1968: multiple assassinations, riots, and the election of Richard Nixon as president. 

Clara Bingham suggests a different time frame in her book Witness to the Revolution.  August 1969 to August 1970 saw the My Lai investigation, the American invasion of Cambodia, domestic bombings and murders, and millions of people protesting in the streets. 

Bingham's book is an oral history compiled from dozens of interviews. 

Grant Mitchell/Wikimedia

Why should the wine and beer aficionados have all the fun?  Both beverages are on the upswing, with small winemaker and brewers dotting the landscape. 

Nick Rementeria and Jen Akin want people to stand up for cocktails, mixed drinks prepared by skilled bartenders. 

Wouldn't you know it, they're both bartenders, and Jen even has a degree in chemistry. 

chriswilson.biz

California and five other states close out the presidential primary season with their votes on June 7. 

Now it's on to the presidential nominating conventions, and all eyes on the final two major party candidates. 

Theirs are by no means the only voices heard in campaign season.  An entrepreneur and former prison inmate named Chris Wilson was featured in a long video ad in the closing days of Bernie Sanders' campaign in California. 

It's all over but the conventions.  Oh, and five more months of campaigning. 

California's primary all but concludes primary season; now it's time to hear from you about the choices we've been presented.  That's one of our VENTSday topics. 

The other: how the media affected this year's presidential campaigns. 

Listeners take center stage on our weekly VENTSday segment, a chance to vent on a couple of topics in the news--by phone, by email, or through our online survey. We provide the topics, you provide the opinions.

HarperCollins

Civil rights legislation passed in the mid-60s, but attitudes took longer to change. 

And the institutions of racism linger to this day.  Those include the continued presence of the Ku Klux Klan, which still exists, albeit far weaker than in its heyday. 

One contributing factor: a successful lawsuit against the United Klans of America by the Southern Poverty Law Center's Morris Dees.  Laurence Leamer's book The Lynching tells the story of the horrific crime that led to the lawsuit, and the suit's lingering impact. 

Wikimedia

The term "police force" becomes ominous to people when the words "use of" appear between them.

No history lesson is necessary to understand that how police use force against fellow citizens is very much in the news, for a couple of years now. 

Oregon Humanities and several other groups are determined to let people discuss the issues; a public forum on Wednesday (June 8) in Eugene addresses police accountability and force, with an eye to possible legislation. 

NAACP Lane County President Eric Richardson moderates and joins us for a preview.  We also bring in  Marianne Dugan, a civil rights attorney; Erious Johnson, Jr. from the Oregon Department of Justice; Oregon State Rep. Lew Frederick, and Daryl Turner from the Portland Police Association.

Cornell University Press

Listen carefully to people in the political system who complain about the uneven distribution of wealth.  They are generally very careful to say that they have no problem with capitalism itself. 

Psychology professor John Ehrenreich takes issue with the KIND of capitalism currently in vogue. 

A system in which some people make piles of money but wages stagnate for the middle and bottom of the wage ladder get their own term: Third Wave Capitalism. 

Wikimedia

Even if you've taken a side in the debate over vaccines, you will probably want to hear Dr. Andrea Ferrante out. 

Ferrante is an assistant professor of biology at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks, and he's just received a grant to study the molecular processes that make vaccines work. 

If your first response is "huh?"... consider this: the creator of vaccines, Edward Jenner, had no idea WHY vaccines worked, and even today's scientists have plenty of questions. 

Jan Jankovic/wikimedia

Recoveries from recessions do not affect all sectors of society equally, we've learned. 

Just ask older workers who lost jobs in the Great Recession.  They've had some bumps and bruises on the way to finding jobs that match their qualifications and salary requirements. 

The Successful Aging Institute at Lane Community College takes note of the trend, and offers an evening workshop on job-hunting resources for workers 50 and up, Tuesday (June 7) at the Eugene Library, downtown. 

Basic Books

You know that thing Americans do, coming together in a time of need?  Not happening at the moment, it can be argued.

And there's plenty of evidence of need... for better-paying jobs, cheaper housing, and general resuscitation of the middle class. 

Yuval Levin, the editor of National Affairs, calls the situation--and his latest book--The Fractured Republic

In Levin's analysis, both left and right are looking back to "good old days" when they should be looking forward.

Pages