The Jefferson Exchange

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JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook and Twitter.  Find the News & Information station list here.

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Oregon Department of Transportation, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=43651491

Who could use a little levity about now?  Al Gini's answer might be: everyone. 

Gini ignores advice from many quarters and examines WHY humor is so important to us. 

His book is The Importance of Being Funny: Whey We Need More Jokes in Our Lives.  Gini teaches business ethics at Loyola University Chicago and delivers philosophy segments on radio. 

yakattackmusic.com

If you want to start a conversation that you know will last a while, ask Josh Gross about favorite bands. 

He loves music, and across a wide spectrum of genres and styles. 

Josh makes music, and writes about music for the Rogue Valley Messenger.  And once a month, he visits the studio with "Rogue Sounds," a compilation of musical samples and news of coming band dates. 

Club Latino Facebook

Hispanic History Month is unusual among declared months, because it begins in the middle of September and goes until the middle of October.  There IS a reason: September 15th is Independence Day for five Latin American countries. 

Many celebrations are planned for the month, and we invited several guests to talk about advancements in Latino society in the Rogue Valley. 

Milo Salgado works for WorkSource Rogue Valley and served on the Hispanic Interagency Committee of the Jackson County Community Services Consortium

Javier de la Rosa works in admissions at Rogue Community College.

insidesou.edu

The academic year had not even begun for most West Coast colleges when President Trump announced he was ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA program.  Under DACA, President Obama suspended any moves to deport young people who had been brought into the United States illegally as children. 

In return, they registered with the government and agreed to work or attend college. 

College presidents uniformly condemned Trump's DACA decision, which puts pressure on Congress to do something. 

Linda Escot-Miranda is a Southern Oregon University student with some perspective on DACA and its impact. 

Smallbones, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10961773

Through triumph and ridicule, the "Greek system" of fraternities and sororities survives on many university campuses.  But the pressure on the system may be greater now than at any time in history. 

Excessive hazing, binge drinking, sexual assault, and racism have all been blamed on Greek houses in recent years. 

In True Gentlemen, John Hechinger investigates one particular fraternity, Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE).  He points to SAE's strong ties to Wall Street and major political figures, and widens the scope to question the future of the Greek system. 

Northern California Prescribed Fire Council

After a long and smoky fire season, plenty of us are more than happy to not even think about outdoor fires. 

But then we remember that fire is part of the ecosystems of the lands around us.  And as a reminder, this week marks the beginning of the annual Klamath River Prescribed Fire Training Exchange (TREX), hosted by the Mid-Klamath Watershed Council. 

So there will be smoke again in the Klamath River valley, just not as much as we saw over the summer. 

Ddgonzal, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2629968

Maybe you thought you'd do good things for the planet by buying an electric car, or at least a hybrid.  But what OTHER car might you have in your garage? 

This is a question explored by four economists, including David Rapson at the University of California at Davis. 

The team discovered that "attribute substitution" enters the picture: families that buy a fuel-efficient car may have a gas-burning SUV as their other vehicle. 

NASA/Public Domain

If you want to understand the science behind climate change, you seek out a scientist, right?  Not necessarily. 

The debate over global warming leaks well beyond the bounds of science. 

Philip Kitcher is a philosopher, and Evelyn Fox Keller is a physicist and professor of the history and philosophy of science. 

They joined forces for a book called The Seasons Alter: How to Save Our Planet in Six Acts.  It places climate change into dialogues--reasonable dialogues--to help people better understand the arguments and dynamics. 

ODFW

"Fish gotta swim, birds gotta fly," Billie Holliday and others once sang.  They might have added "wolves gotta hunt." 

And that particular action brings wolves, now reestablishing their range in our region, into conflict with humans.  Not face to face, but in predation of valuable livestock owned by humans. 

The conflicts have the full attention of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the National Wildlife Research Center of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 

That's where Dr. Julie Young works to reduce human-wildlife conflict. 

phys.org/John Chapman

The 2011 Tohuku earthquake and tsunami in Japan sent plenty of debris across the Pacific.  Boats, docks, and more ended up on Oregon beaches. 

And they were occupied; not by people, but by species unknown on this side of the ocean. 

How big an effect was it, and how common is "species rafting?" 

These questions are explored in a recent report by scientists at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology and the Hatfield Marine Science Center of Oregon State University. 

Rhoda Baer for National Cancer Institute, ID 7496.

You don't get a choice in whether or not you get cancer. 

But you do get a choice--many choices, in fact--in how your cancer is treated.  This is the main message radiation oncologist David Palma delivers in his book Taking Charge of Cancer

Dr. Palma explores the reasons why doctors choose certain treatment approaches; why they advise radiation, or chemotherapy, or surgery, or a combination. 

The book is full of details on making treatment plans AND picking the best treatment team. 

Bald Futurist Facebook page

Just imagine the anxieties of college students these days.  They are training for careers that may, and probably will, change drastically over their working careers. 

Steven Brown has seen such changes in his work in high tech, including at Intel. 

Now as a speaker, "The Bald Futurist," he speaks to students about facing and embracing the future. 

U.S. Census Bureau

Before it was called "public TV," it was often called "educational TV," and Southern Oregon's PBS affiliate is putting a new focus on education. 

Southern Oregon Public TV, SOPTV, is joining the PBS Teacher Community program.  The program gives teachers in primarily rural districts, both new and older, a chance to sharpen skills. 

Ben Garcia is SOPTV's "Teacher Ambassador" and Larry Conley, a retired teacher, will speak at an upcoming teacher summit. 

Beatrice Murch/Wikimedia

A journalist and a comic actor walk into a bar. 

It's not the setup to a joke, it's the start of two men helping other people start conversations. 

Chris Colin and Rob Baedeker, journalist and comic, respectively, teamed up for a book on getting a conversation off the ground: What to Talk About

Christina Belasco/OPB

Most of the Klamath River (see algae map)  looks like pea soup of late.  A toxic algae bloom is affecting the river on both sides of the state line. 

Oregon ended, then reissued an algae warning for the Link River and the Klamath River above Keno Dam. 

On the California side, warnings are in effect for much of the main stem of the river and for Copco and Iron Gate reservoirs.

Agencies including the Karuk Tribe keep an eye on lower reaches of the river.  Craig Tucker and Susan Fricke from the tribe and Rebecca Hillwig of Oregon Health Authority's Harmful Algal Bloom program are familiar with the outbreaks. 

MANCC

Andromeda and Venus sound like great characters to build a dance around.  Now add wheelchairs. 

That is exactly what the art/architecture/social justice group Kinetic Light is doing with its work "DESCENT." 

The piece will have its West Coast debut at the Britt Festivals on Friday (September 29), after Kinetic Light spends five days in residence at Crater Renaissance Academy in Central Point. 

GeographBot/Wikimedia

Stories of immigration in the United States--both legal and not--tend to focus on numbers and generalities. 

Journalist Lauren Markham went looking for a personal tale behind the facts and figures.  She found a pair of brothers who were forced to flee gang violence in El Salvador and headed north. 

Markham tells the story in the book The Far Away Brothers, an examination of the brothers' situation and immigration policy more broadly. 

ad01.asmrc.org

California's far North recently gained some clout in the state legislature. 

First District Assembly Member Brian Dahle (R-Bieber) was chosen by fellow Republicans to be the party's leader in the house. 

The GOP is in the minority in a chamber where Democrats hold a super-majority.  And Dahle has some ideas about reducing the Democratic edge in the 2018 elections. 

Lulu Vision

The teen years are tough enough without also having to worry about where you'll sleep next. 

But teen homelessness is a fact of life in many communities.  And a recently-formed group in Redding seeks to come up with some solutions. 

Aaron Hayes of Catalyst Mentoring has some experience with homeless teens; he is a member of the new group. 

Kim Wing, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=55316196

The scary face-off between the United States and North Korea has a long history, with a lot of personalities involved.  American presidents and the Kim family, sure.  But have you ever heard of Donald Nichols?  You will now. 

Nichols was a 7th-grade dropout recruited to spy for the Americans on the Korean peninsula after World War II. 

He quickly grew into a master spy and master of black ops, a story told in Blaine Harden's book King of Spies:The Dark Reign of America’s Spymaster in Korea. 

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