The Jefferson Exchange

News & Info: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook.  Find the News & Information station list here.

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Edward J. O'Neill/National Fish and Wildlife Service

Upper Klamath Lake is full of food for fish. 

So it's a bit of a mystery why big fish like redband trout leave the lake and head into its tributaries, where there's less food. 

Oregon Fish and Wildlife has a new tool in potentially solving the mystery: radio tags in the fish.  The tags will help ODFW track fish movements in and around the lake. 

Wikimedia

The plight of bees in recent years produced a swelling of concern about pollinators. 

Bees are not the only pollinators, and the others have problems, too. 

Take the monarch butterfly, for example.  A report published last month by the Xerces Society in Portland shows a huge drop in monarchs gathering at winter sites in California, down 74% in two decades. 

Simon & Schuster

He was a 19-year-old sailor ashore in Japan.  She was a 31-year-old Japanese woman. 

It sounds like the beginning to a song, but it's a true story for Paul Brinkley-Rogers, former sailor and Pulitzer-winning journalist. 

It's a love story too big to fit in a web caption... but fits well in Brinkley-Rogers' memoir Please Enjoy Your Happiness

Willamettans Family Nudist Resort

On those hot sticky days, some of us wonder why we wear clothes at all.  Then there are the people who stopped wondering years ago. 

Nudists gather in Springfield this week for the annual convention of the American Association for Nude Recreation

As the name implies, members spend plenty of time in the nude--they hasten to add, in appropriate places. 

MatthewDiffee.com

There are cartoonists, and then there are New Yorker cartoonists. 

Getting a cartoon into the famous magazine is a mark of success, one Matthew Diffee has received many times over.  He is also the winner of a Reuben Award, something like a cartoonist's Oscar. 

Matt Diffee and his new book Hand Drawn Jokes for Smart Attractive People show up together at the Eugene Library on Saturday at 2 PM. 

NPR

A lot of what we know about the world got locked up a long time ago.  What if we're just plain wrong? 

The NPR podcast "Invisibilia" explores the forces that shape our world and influence our behavior.  We give the second hour of the Exchange time slot over to "Invisibilia" for seven straight Fridays, ending in September. 

Enjoy the stories and the science that make the show unique. 

This week: Most of us believe our personalities, and those of our loved ones, are predictable and constant over time.  But what if they aren’t? 

Jami Dwyer/Wikimedia

When and where to cut trees is a constant topic of debate in our part of the world. 

In other areas, it's less a debate than a mourning process, as vast areas that were once forest become agricultural land... minus the trees. 

Researchers Yann le Polain de Waroux (Stanford) and Rachael Garrett (Boston U.) studied the process in parts of Latin America. 

Wikimedia

One of the more spectacular movies of the silent era is largely a product of Oregon. 

"The General," Buster Keaton's film commemorating a famous railroad chase during the Civil War, was shot on a now-abandoned railroad east of Cottage Grove. 

Now the film is coming home, so to speak, on a tour of Oregon with spanking-new score by Portland composer Mark Orton.  "Score" in this sense means performed LIVE while the film plays on the screen.

Tysto/Wikimedia

You frequently hear people refer to the United States as an "experiment" in its approach to liberty. 

Well, experiments fail.  And that is the concern of Eric Metaxas, author and radio host. 

His latest book is If You Can Keep It, a warning of what we could lose by not paying attention to the intentions of the country's founders. 

Wikimedia

Over the half-century the United States tested (and used) nuclear weapons, a million people or more in the armed forces had the potential to be exposed to nuclear materials. 

These are the people who make up the National Association of Atomic Veterans

NAAV works to communicate the ongoing needs of its members to the federal government. 

National Commander Fred Schafer lives in Oregon. 

Nudists gather in Eugene for a national convention, and an Ashland bookstore feuds with the Shakespeare Festival over banned books. 

Seems like a VENTSday topic to us: whether it's books or bodies, where and when is censorship appropriate? 

VENTSday removes the guests and puts listener comments front and center on The Exchange. Once a week, it's all about you... we plop a pair of topics on the table, post a survey on our Facebook page, and open the phone lines and email box for live comments.

Got an observation or opinion? Share it with the State of Jefferson on VENTSday.

Geoffrey Riley/JPR News

11 different acts are booked for the West Coast Country Music Festival this weekend near Ashland.  At least one had to get parental permission to attend.

And Rainy and The Rattlesnakes got that permission... because Dad is one of the Rattlesnakes. 

Rainy Miatke is the title performer; she and sister Lela started playing instruments before they were ten, and formed a band with their dad, Ray, soon after. Lucas Brinkerhoff plays bass for the group. 

BLM

The feel of the Old West came through in the novels of Zane Grey. 

Grey came to love the Rogue River Valley, and built himself a cabin near the river.  The cabin recently earned designation on the National Register of Historic Places, giving it a firmer shot at survival. 

The Bureau of Land Management has been owner of the cabin for much of the last decade. 

BLM

Animal rights activists and the Bureau of Land Management have clashed for years over the proper management of wild horses in the West. 

Now the clash is potentially headed for court over BLM's proposal to provide surgical birth control to mares currently held in Oregon. 

That prompted Front Range Equine Rescue to file suit in federal court. 

Wikimedia

  Tests at two Medford elementary schools (Jackson and Roosevelt) recently found elevated lead levels in the water. 

Which would be a source of concern in any school, but perhaps even more at these two.  Because both had undergone extensive remodeling in the last decade, with replacement of much of the plumbing. 

Bottled water during summer activities provides a short-term solution. 

Southern Oregon University has been dealing with very similar issues. 

Geoffrey Riley/JPR News

Oregon State Senator Alan Bates (D-Medford) died suddenly on Friday, August 5th. 

He served Southern Oregon in the legislature for 16 years, first in the House, then in the Senate.  And it's not like he didn't already have a full-time job; Dr. Bates--"Doc" to his legislative colleagues--saw and healed patients out of a practice in Medford. 

He brought his medical knowledge to bear on his legislative work, helping shape Oregon's innovative approach to Medicaid. 

We invited some of the people who worked with Sen. Bates and knew him best to join us. 

Wikimedia

It's not every day we read a co-memoir.  Especially when such a book is published after the death of one of the co-authors. 

But Ashland resident Josh Gross got a packet of his father's papers at his father's funeral. 

And that led to the book appropriately titled The Funeral Papers, detailing the often strained and ultimately estranged relationship between Josh and Arnie Gross. 

Wikimedia

Raise your child to be an individual.  But not a jerk. 

Compassionate, but not wishy-washy.  Strong, but sensitive. 

See, we get plenty of advice on parenting that doesn't quite add up. 

Ultimately, what we're doing is Raising Human Beings, which happens to be the title of child psychologist Ross Greene's new book.  His approach is all about collaborating with children, while maintaining a solid parent-child relationship. 

Living In Color In Southern Oregon

Aug 4, 2016
JPR

It's hard for most residents of the region to imagine what it's like to live as a person of color.  Because there are so very few. 

And the overwhelming whiteness of the population has produced some regrettable events and periods in the region's history, like the rise of the Ku Klux KIan in the 1920s. 

People of color still experience discrimination today.  We assembled an all non-white panel and host to explore the issues. 

Robert Goodwin of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival hosts the discussion. 

Josh Morrell/Brittfest.org

Any Friday is something of an event. First Friday is a slightly bigger deal in the arts world, as several communities in our region observe First Friday Art Walks. 

The Exchange goes with the flow, with our monthly First Friday Arts segment. 

We open the phone lines (800-838-3760) and invite arts organizations from throughout the listening area to call in with details of arts events in the coming weeks... from fine art to open mike nights, all arts events are fair game. 

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