The Jefferson Exchange

News & Info: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook.  Find the News & Information station list here.

Or suggest a guest for The Exchange.

Flickr / Dark Sevier

It’s been a year since the North Dakota Access Pipeline broke ground, a year that brought thousands of people together in opposition to that project.

Three of those people join us to talk about their reasons for going to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation and how the lessons of that resistance resonate in Northern California and Southern Oregon.

Wikimedia Commons

The Píkyav Field Institute is part of the Karuk Tribe’s efforts to provide culturally relevant educational access in the remote reaches of California.

The idea is to connect young people with the land and indigenous culture. It's being supported by a $1,000,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Education to the Karuk Tribe.

TKO: Racial Histories Of Oregon

Jan 30, 2017
An Oregon Canyon / Donnell Alexander

The Keenest Observers is an occasional segment dealing with difference and inclusion in a place where the vast majority of people are white.

This month we look at how race is inscribed on Oregon geography.  Donnell Alexander is a filmmaker and writer, whose recent work documents place names and early African-American homesteaders. Randy Blazak is Chair of the Portland-based Coalition Against Hate Crimes (CAHC). He speaks to the history of the KKK in Oregon, and the perennial re-emergence of white supremacist messaging through fliers, websites and radio programs.

http://marksundeen.com/

Making life simpler can be complicated. Ditching your smartphone could mean turning your back on work, or turning a blind eye to current events.

But when does all this become less about informing us, and more about making us anxious? With this at heart some people are trying to extract themselves from the parts of the world they're least empowered to change. How and why does one go about "unsettling," and creating a simpler life? A journalist studied this very question.

http://www.heartisan.foundation/

Whoever said children should be seen and not heard would have done well to follow their own advice. The voices of young people can motivate and inspire us to see the world less cynically.

We welcome such voices on the Exchange. Since the live broadcast is during school hours, our guide is an adult. Abram Katz is Education Director with the Heartisan Foundation. It operates The Heartisan Youth Center in Grant Pass.

Photos Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

If finding a home to rent has you pulling your hair out, you aren't alone. Oregon has one of the lowest rental vacancy rates in the country.

For those that do find a place, rent costs are high and rising. We unpack housing issues with Speaker of THE House in Oregon, Tina Kotek. Kotek is a Democrat from Portland, where the problems with affordable housing are stark.

SOhumane.org

When it comes to which animals we eat, and which ones we pet: every culture is different. Horse meat is an hors d'oeuvre in Belgium.

People in the U.S. eat a lot of cows, though they're sacred beasts to many in India. And in parts of Asia, dogs are fare game. So often the issue is not WHICH animals end up on the plates, but HOW they are procured and killed. Advocates for dogs caught up in the Thailand meat trade say the dogs can be stolen and tortured.

Wikimedia user cgaa

With more than seven billion of us and counting, humans are the most prolific primate species on Earth.

This boon for man may be the undoing of apes, plus many other non-human primates like monkeys, tarsiers, lemurs and lorises. A recent study found that about two thirds of all non-human primate species are now threatened with extinction, and three quarters have declining populations.

Kellyworman.com

Art reflects the times of the artist.

What will contemporary artists have to say about the age of Trump? Artist Richard Prince recently denounced his portrait of Ivanka Trump, in a case of satire doubling down on itself, or perhaps, meeting with sincerity.

We talk with artist Kelly Worman about what to make of that: art, politics and how the lines blur. Worman is a guest curator at Southern Oregon University's Schneider Museum of Art.

BLM

Thank goodness for the dry environment in the vicinity of Paisley, Oregon. 

The conditions have helped preserve evidence of possible human habitation thousands of years ago... long before the usual theories about the first humans in North America. 

Dennis Jenkins at the University of Oregon has supervised many digs at the Paisley Caves, and now he reports on the finding of very old horse bones found there.  Dr. Jenkins shares the microphone in this month's edition of "Underground History." 

Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup

Check out the web page of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and click on the markers for recent earthquakes.

You'll be surprised to see that they happen all the time... it's just that few of them are strong enough for us to feel. 

The Cascadia Subduction Zone in which we live poses a constant threat of big earthquakes, and other features can also contribute to powerful Earth movements. 

Seismic Network president John Vidale lectures this week at Southwestern Oregon Community College on temblors in the Northwest. 

Public Domain/Wikimedia

Our once-in-a-while opinion round robin gets a new name for the new year: TWO CENTS DAY. 

It's a nod to a more positive kind of discussion, not just the stream of heated consciousness implied by the old name, VENTSday. 

The first time out of the gate, we invite you to join some of the people in last weekend's womens' marches.  We asked several of them why they attended, and what their signs said. 

Whether you did, did not, or would not march, give us your two cents at 800-838-3760 or JX@jeffnet.org

White House Photo Office/Wikimedia

Journalist Matt Taibbi won't win any friends at the White House with the title of his latest book: Insane Clown President

But then Taibbi, a Rolling Stone contributor, is not known for his diplomacy, just a call-it-like-I-see-it attitude in his writing. 

He rewinds the tape of the 2016 election campaign in all its grace and glory, examining the moves, countermoves, and just plain dumb luck that resulted in the November outcome. 

PGHolbrook/Wikimedia Commons

A flurry of federal environmental protections took place in the waning days of the Obama administration. 

In addition to the much-publicized expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, 100,000 acres of headwaters of the Smith River and other streams were withdrawn from possible mining by an action of the Interior Department. 

It is not a permanent block, though it would likely be a long time before mining interests were able to work their claims. 

The Kalmiopsis Audubon Society is one of several groups that pushed for the mineral withdrawal. 

Google Streetview

The Southern Oregon Historical Society is trying not to become history itself.

SOHS was once funded by property taxes, but a change in law allowed its levy money to be redirected, and it was. 

The organization has struggled since then, with programs and staff cut to a bare minimum. 

Staff is now all-volunteer.  And a tax levy to create a historic preservation district failed in the November election. 

SSgt Alesia Goosic/U.S. Navy/Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22686562

The doctor arrives in the exam room after you've waited a while. 

And it's great that she's finally here, but is she really present? 

Doctors are thoroughly trained, but they also have to work like the rest of us to make sure they're present in the moment. 

Ronald Epstein, a doctor himself, writes about mindfulness in medicine in his book Attending. It includes examples of doctors who have (and have not) stepped up when the moment demanded.

Jon Sullivan

It's becoming a regular part of the Dungeness crab season on the West Coast: waiting for domoic acid levels to drop into safe ranges. 

When they're up, the crab fishery is closed to protect human health.  It's open now, after a delay.

Oregon State researcher Morgaine McKibben looked into the ocean conditions that appear to contribute to the rise in domoic acid, which is a neurotoxin. 

The work McKibben and five other researchers produced is published in a scientific journal

pulsepoint.org

A friend collapses, complaining of chest pain.  You reach for the phone, call 911, and activate an app that finds people nearby who know CPR. 

This is not science fiction, it is an existing app called Pulsepoint

Emergency medical crews in Jackson County are embracing Pulsepoint as a way to get medical help to heart attack patients faster.  The program launches in Jackson County February 1st.

revolutionwhereyoulive.org

Talk of revolution breaks over the American consciousness in waves every so often, maybe more often just before and after elections. 

Yes! Magazine co-founder Sarah Van Gelder, who practices "solutions journalism," took a cross-country trip to find people who are already changing the country and the way it does business, one local effort at a time. 

The result is Van Gelder's book The Revolution Where You Live, detailing her odyssey from the Northwest to the East Coast and back. 

From downtrodden Newark and Detroit to the Bakken oil field and Montana coal country, there's a lot going on. 

EPA

The Oregon Environmental Council is a non-partisan non-profit focused on the environmental health of living things in Oregon.  That's rather like the mission of the federal Environmental Protection Agency. 

But OEC is concerned with President-Elect Trump's choice to head the EPA, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt.  Pruitt is a climate change denier who has taken the EPA to court on several occasions. 

OEC's Deputy Director, Chris Hagerbaumer, has many stories to tell about environmental successes in Oregon and how she hopes they'll continue under new EPA leadership. 

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