The Jefferson Exchange

News & Info: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook.  Find the News & Information station list here.

Or suggest a guest for The Exchange.

Oregon Shakespeare Festival

First comes Valentine's Day, then comes "Shakespeare in Love." 

A play based on the movie by that name is among the offerings at this year's season of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, fast approaching. 

Previews of the season's first plays begin on February 17th (""in Love"" on the 18th). 

It is another big and ambitious season at OSF; its director of literary development and dramaturgy, Amrita Ramanan, visits. 

Stefan Kühn, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=105738

It's a weird time in the history of information.  On one hand, the Internet makes so much information available so quickly, it's easy to stay informed. 

On the other hand, people fight about facts and truth far more than they used to, and the president himself even referred to a news organization as "fake news" shortly before he took office. 

We track the changes in the world of information in a new segment called Signals & Noise, starting today. 

Our partners: the Communications department at Southern Oregon University. 

Darin Ransom | JPR Director of Engineering

We can be wary of the earthquake potential of the Cascadia Subduction Zone and still appreciate what it's done for the landscape. 

The meeting of tectonic plates far beneath us makes our part of the world quake-prone, but beautiful, too. 

Mountains and other dramatic landforms are the products of the earth moving; Robert Lillie demonstrates in his book Beauty from the Beast: Plate Tectonics and the Landscapes of the Pacific Northwest

Lillie taught geosciences at Oregon State and led ranger tours on geology. 

Austin Jenkins/Northwest News Network

It's still taking a while for some terms to sink in: "cannabis industry." 

Who would have thought a few years ago that Oregon and California would be able to use that term, legally? 

The growth of the industry is phenomenal, including the likes of "Grow Condos," a large warehouse for growing weed in Eagle Point. 

The company CEO has big plans for things like a cannabis-friendly RV park. 

speakforthetreesoregon.org

Pick a forest, and there's usually a story about people fighting over a timber sale or two. 

So it is in Oregon's Little Applegate Valley, where people enjoying a rustic way of life are concerned about plans to harvest timber on federal land. 

The issue is the subject of the short film "Speak for the Trees," one of the entries in this year's Siskiyou Film Fest, Sunday (February 12) in Grants Pass. 

You still hear someone talk about "horse sense" now and then. 

We can get a lot deeper into the conversation with Linda Kohanov. 

She knows horses and the people who work with them, and she shows how their expertise can benefit us, in the book The Five Ways Of the Master Herder

Jason Kasper, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4067638

It's a big step, choosing to teach a child at home rather than sending him or her to school. 

There are requirements to measure what home-school students learn, but parents have a lot of latitude in deciding what and how to teach. 

For those who feel a bit overwhelmed, there are resources available, both from the public school system, and from the likes of the Cascadia Learning Cooperative

Wikimedia

The days of hiding in the shadows are largely over for members of the LGBTQ community.  Or are they?

Society's attitudes toward people who are not strictly heterosexual have changed, but over a long time, and with a lot of pressure from a lot of people. 

And they all have stories to tell, stories being collected by the Coming Out Project

BASF

Isn't there just ONE thing you'd like to see changed in our food through genetic engineering?  For a lot of people, the answer is a resounding NO. 

It is a selling point to be GMO-free.  But GMO true believers stick by their (gene) guns. 

Environmental journalist McKay Jenkins visited with them and a lot of people on both sides for his book Food Fight: GMOs and the Future of the American Diet. 

Public Domain/Wikimedia

The ocean's mysteries are largely uncharted. We do know many of its creatures are delicious.

Yet the unknowns can multiply (or bioaccumulate), when something edible makes the trip from sea to plate.

Jennifer Burns Bright is a food writer who explores these issues, and our collective taste for the deep and briny.

She's based in Port Orford and the leader of an Oregon Humanities Conversation project about the traditions and challenges of seafood in Oregon.

Ashland Automotive

What ails your car?  Zach Edwards can't fix a car over the phone, but he can certainly try to diagnose the problem. 

This month we focus on how to decide if you should sell or fix an ailing car.

Zach is the proprietor of Ashland Automotive, and our monthly visitor for a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel.

Wikimedia Commons

Reading a pesticide label is a bit like plunging headlong into a foreign language, one with a fast-changing vocabulary. For example: neonicotinoids.

They're a relatively new class of pesticides, favored now because they cause less toxicity in birds and mammals than insects. But that's not good news for pollinators.

Two pesticide experts join us to translate what neonic pesticides mean for the insects who actually help plants grow.  Aimée Code is Pesticide Program Director for The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. Dr. Susan Kegley heads up the Pesticide Research Institute.

JPR News

Since the November election, some of our friends and neighbors speak in terms of "resistance." 

There's a similar message in the musical program "Resist," but the work pre-dates the election. 

Southern Oregon percussion duo Caballito Negro, previous guests of The Exchange, join forces with Left Edge Percussion for a concert that features flutes, "a truckload of percussion," spoken word, film, and images. 

The concert is Thursday, February 9th. 

Cephas, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27124271

The First Friday in February has arrived, and with it, a look ahead to a passel of performances and exhibitions in the arts. 

We call it our First Friday Arts segment, a call-driven segment where YOU are the guest. 

If you have an event on stage or gallery or screen to report, tell the rest of the audience, at 800-838-3760. 

You'll be talking to listeners from Mendocino to Eugene. 

Siskiyou Music Project

Complete this sentence: "Moon River, wider _____________."  If you said "than a mile," you're familiar with the music of Johnny Mercer. 

His songs form the heart of a program coming to the stage on February 18th, with vocals by Chris Williams and guitar by Ed Dunsavage. 

It is the kickoff to an entire season of performances from the Siskiyou Music Project

Wikimedia/JPArt

Think of some of the great lines in literature, like "frankly my dear, I don't give a damn."

Now try to imagine those lines delivered by text message.  Would they be the same? 

In the hands of Mallory Ortberg, they are hilarious.  She wrote a book a few years back called Texts from Jane Eyre, with imaginary electronic messages back and forth between some of the major characters in literature. 

DAVID ILIFF. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0

In an age of "libtards" and "cuckservatives," is there any reason to believe we can conduct our discussions of government more with more civility?  The Institute for Civility in Government thinks so. 

The institute's name is its mission, a tall order in a time when opposite sides of an argument don't even agree on the facts. 

The Rev. Cassandra Dahnke is the co-founder of the institute. 

U.S. Fish & Wildlife

At one time, the number of California condors could be counted on the hands of just three people. 

The bird--largest land bird in North America--was that close to extinction.  Now it numbers in the hundreds, both in captivity and in the wild. 

And plans to reintroduce condors to their historic habitat continue, most notably with a plan to bring the birds to Redwood National Park. 

It's a joint project of many partners, including US Fish & Wildife, the National Park Service, and the Yurok tribe. 

Hunter Desportes, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12800857

The British Invasion in popular music gave way to more free-form sounds as the 1960s went on. 

And that phase gave way to "glam rock" and David Bowie and Lou Reed and the New York Dolls. 

Could a fan of Led Zeppelin like Queen at the same time?  Simon Reynolds ponders these issues in his book on the genre, Shock and Awe: Glam Rock and Its Legacy, from the Seventies to the Twenty-first Century

Wikimedia

Josh Gross has an addiction, and it's one we're only too happy to share. 

He loves music, and across a wide spectrum of genres and styles. 

Josh makes music, and writes about music for the Rogue Messenger.  And once a month, he visits the studio with "Rogue Sounds," a compilation of musical samples and news of coming band dates. 

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