The Jefferson Exchange

News & Info: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live call-in program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook.

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Social media and the drought are combining for a new phenomenon in California: drought shaming.

Water your lawn too much, and you could end up on Facebook, singled out for scorn. 

Tell us what you think of the process in VENTSday. 

You can also comment on voter registration, and whether it should be open to any adult. 

Penguin Books

Oregon entered a new era with the legalization of marijuana for personal use two weeks ago.

This comes after years of wrestling with the nuances of medical marijuana, legal for years now. 

Medical pot tends to exist as a parallel health care system, separate from the medical mainstream. 

But one MD is all for marijuana as medicine... Dr. David Casarett is the author of Stoned: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana. 

Oregon Department of Transportation

Welcome to the age of what comes AFTER gasoline taxes.

Fuel taxes pay for road repair and maintenance... or did. 

The advent of hybrid and straight-electric vehicles reduces per-capita fuel consumption, and road funds with it.   

Oregon is just now rolling out OReGO, its voluntary program for drivers to pay road taxes by miles traveled. 

OreGO's Michelle Godfrey explains how the program works, and what is required of participants.
 

If period novels or murder mysteries are not challenging enough for summer reading, maybe physics or cosmology are more up your alley.

University of Oregon physics professor Jim Brau is ready for you. 

Dr. Brau will give a public talk at the Eugene library this week (July 15) on "Why Antimatter Matters."

Here's our chance to find out more about this... er, substance?  that we heard so much about in Star Trek and other science fiction vehicles. 

Chronicle Books

Writing letters may be passé now, but people great and small through history have written tons of them.

Shaun Usher wowed us a while back with his book "Letters of Note;" now he has a worthy follow-up.

Usher collected some of the lists written by key figures in history, and those form the center of his newest book Lists of Note.

Wikimedia

Urges to action on climate change frequently come with critiques of current business practices.

Now businesses are joining forces to make their own call for action on climate change. 

The Oregon Business Climate Declaration is about THE climate, not "business climate." 

And companies from Nike to Dutch Bros. are among the roughly 400 businesses signing on. 

Our Children's Trust

The teenagers who sued the state of Oregon over climate change got their day in court.

And the court said no, in essence.  Now the teens are appealing their case to a higher court. 

Basic Books

Despite what it may sound like on the radio, How to Bake Pi is NOT a cookbook.  Or is it?

True, there are recipes in the book, but Eugenia Cheng's version of lasagna teaches us more about the number five than cooking technique. 

Ellin Beltz/Wikimedia

Drought and heat waves are making it a tough summer for some of the region's waterways.

But even before the drought and summer, many streams had already reached various stages of disrepair. 

Including the Eel River, largely in Humboldt County.

Oregon Shakespeare Festival

The long season at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival includes two plays opening this month, including "The Happiest Song Plays Last."

It is a sequel to "Water By The Spoonful," which played OSF just last year. 

Perigee Books

April Peveteaux does not avoid gluten because avoidance is trendy.

She has celiac disease, which produces a painful reaction to gluten. 

But she's fought the stuff to a standstill... witness her blog, "Gluten Is My Bitch." 

36 Inches The Movie

Environmental issues frequently make news in our region.  But few issues can stir up passions with just three letters: LNG.

The proposal for a liquefied natural gas export terminal at North Bend and a 230-plus mile pipeline too is like nails on a blackboard to many people.

Including the ones who made a mini-documentary film about the pipeline: "36 Inches."

Photo: Jenny Graham / | Oregon Shakespeare Festival

When times are tight, the arts are often the first to meet the ax. But what about the cost of NOT supporting the arts in society? Dollars and cents won’t tally that.  

A new initiative is seeking out more poetic measures, by asking people what they value about art and how to best express those values. 

Atheneum Books

Ashley Rhodes lived in a foster home.  Then another, and another, and so on.

14 foster homes in all, before she was adopted at age 12. 

Now Ashley Rhodes-Courter, she speaks and writes about her experiences, and the successful life she's built in spite of years of neglect and abuse in the foster system in Florida. 

Her second memoir is Three More Words (after the earlier Three Little Words). 

Wikimedia

Urban renewal is not just for big cities.  Even smaller towns have their issues with areas that were once developed badly, or just got blighted over time.  Count the city of Phoenix in Jackson County among those smaller towns.  

The creation of a pair of one-way streets to carry Oregon 99 through the heart of town created an area often called "the hole" by locals.  The hole is about to be filled with new buildings and a re-sculpting of the land that is meant to be environmentally sensitive.  

Oregon's Medicaid Expansion Going Well

Jul 7, 2015
National Institute of Health

Oregon began putting its own spin on providing health care to the public even before the Affordable Care Act--"Obamacare"--took effect.  

  The work of the state's version of Medicaid, the Oregon Health Plan, is now distributed through CCOs, coordinated care organizations.  And a recent report from the Oregon Health Authority shows the system working well, despite an influx of newly-insured patients under the federal law.  

US Fish & Wildlife

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the Klamath Water and Power Authority (KWAPA) join forces on a number of water projects.  Now ​the federal agency that evaluates whistleblower complaints says there's cause to investigate how KWAPA spent tens of millions in federal funding.  

  Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility--PEER--announced that a whistleblower says money meant for fish conservation went to irrigators instead, and millions may have been wasted. 

Fastest Things On Wings

Jul 6, 2015

In the list of unusual jobs, "hummingbird rehabber" must rank pretty high.  But hummingbirds do get hurt, and Terry Masear is there to help them back to health, where possible.  

  It seems that even people who are relatively jaded about wildlife get interested when hummingbirds are involved.  Terry describes her job and its successes in her book "Fastest Things On Wings."  

  JeffX 7/7 @ 8:30: The efforts to improve living conditions for fish tend to focus on big dams, like the four proposed for removal on the Klamath River.  But changes to existing small dams can help as well.  

  The federal Bureau of Reclamation will upgrade the fish ladder at a small irrigation dam in Ashland this summer.  The project is part of a broader effort to make life better for fish throughout the Rogue River Basin.  BOR's Doug DeFlitch joins us. 

The Crimes They Are A-Changin'

Jul 6, 2015

Marijuana is legal in Oregon, so now what?  While the state prepares the way for retail sales to begin, a lot of other details have to be settled.  

For one thing, what happens to people who were charged and convicted for marijuana crimes that are NO LONGER crimes?  

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