The Jefferson Exchange

News & Info: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live call-in program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook.

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Sukeyforbes.com

We can barely comprehend the death of a child to disease, even in the abstract.

Sukey Forbes had to deal with it as a reality in her own life, when her daughter died at age six. 

Her odyssey through grief and the search for meaning--including visits with clairvoyants--is told in Forbes' book The Angel in My Pocket: A Story of Love, Loss, and Life After Death

Wikimedia

The ongoing drought in California is turning attention in a number of directions, including to the water bottling industry. 

Several companies have come under fire for continuing to bottle water in a state hard-hit by drought. 

And in one case, the plant in question is not even open yet: the Crystal Geyser Water Company plant in Mount Shasta. 

Wikimedia

The Northwest Forest Plan just turned 20 years old, but "Happy Birthday" might not be the appropriate comment. 

The plan was designed to preserve both old growth timber and spotted owls, and both are still in decline. 

The monitoring apparatus that came with the plan just released a 20-year progress report. 

Christian LInder/Wikimedia

We're getting to know more about Alzheimer's disease over time.  And that's true in two senses: researchers understand it better, but more people have it, too. 

And there are still varieties of dementia that are not Alzheimer's. 

Dr. Patrick Gillette has come to know them well in his work at Rogue Community Health and elsewhere in the health care system. 

He'll speak about Alzheimer's later this week at a health conference in Medford. 

Geoffrey Riley/JPR

Daniel Breaux (yep, pronounced "bro") deserves a big smile on his face when he walks in the graduation ceremony at Southern Oregon University on Saturday (June 13th). 

He actually graduated two terms early, despite using a lot of his time helping SOU win a national championship on the football field. 

And he's entering a field of work that is very much the focus of attention these days: he'll be a police officer in Berkeley, California. 

Penguin Books

It's a good thing we speak English.  We hear it is VERY hard to learn for people who did not grow up with it. 

And that's partly because it's such a mish-mosh of parts of earlier languages (and some living ones). 

And we make it harder on ourselves with the way we use it, as Ammon Shea demonstrates in Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation

Wikimedia

If a young person challenges you to a game of chess, find out where they're from.  And if it's Coquille and you're not very good, RUN! 

The Coquille Chess Club took five players to the national championships in April, a huge feat for a team from a small town. 

Brothers Aaron and Joshua Grabinsky took home some serious hardware. 

Gold Hill Whitewater Center

Some of the best whitewater running in the country and maybe the world is available on the Rogue River. 

Now a group of whitewater enthusiasts wants to add some voltage, through the creation of the Gold Hill Whitewater Center. 

It would include an Olympic-class kayak run, along with many other features. 

Emilykinneymusic.com

At home fighting zombies and singing songs: yep, that's Emily Kinney

She became a regular cast member of the AMC horror show "The Walking Dead," while writing and recording and performing her own music. 

Kinney lived briefly in Oregon and returns to the region for a Portland show Sunday, followed by a San Francisco set on Tuesday. 

W.W. Norton

Our brains are capable of amazing things, but they are just a little behind the times. 

Psychiatrist and author Peter Whybrow reminds us that the brain's construction is about survival in the wild, not about navigating a land of plenty in food and consumer goods. 

So we need a tune-up, he says, in The Well-Tuned Brain: Neuroscience & The Life Well Lived.

Mt. Shasta Ski Park

It's not enough to call the snowpack from last winter low in California. 

By the end of the measuring season, there was no snow to measure. 

At Mt. Shasta, the ski park didn’t open for long last winter and it won't open for summer activities, to keep costs down and save money. 

Depending on snow has turned into a risky business in the region. 

The high temperature in Medford hit 105 Monday, 26 degrees above what is considered "normal" for the date. 

So let's talk weather and climate in VENTSday... do you need any more convincing that things are different? 

Our other topic: letting states place their own regulations on campaign spending.  What do you think? 

Our weekly VENTSday segment puts the listeners front and center. We throw a pair of topics on the table, and let callers and emailers vent--politely--on those topics.

Megathon Charlie/Flickr

It's always a politically risky move to vote for stronger regulations on guns, and the Oregon Legislature went there this year. 

A month ago the governor signed a bill that requires background checks for all gun sales, even private person-to-person sales. 

Senator Floyd Prozanski of Eugene shepherded the bill through the capitol. 

And just a few weeks after it passed, Lane County Commissioners passed a resolution opposing the law, on grounds that it will cost counties more money to enforce. 

The drought in California will only get more acute as we leave the rainy season behind. 

And there are some situations that are akin to being aboard a ship approaching an iceberg with no steering. 

Like the presence of parasites in the Klamath River which thrive in warm water. 

The Yurok Tribe and other participants in Klamath water-quality efforts can do little to avert a major fish kill due to the parasites and other factors. 

Wikimedia

On a hot day, a place to swim on a lake or river looks very inviting. 

Those days are here, and so are the concerns about the safety of each swimming hole. 

Rocks aside, dangers can lurk in those inviting waters. 

Which is why Rogue Riverkeeper and similar programs across the country are helping swimmers out, by testing the water for Swim Guide.

New Society Publishers

Who grows your food?  The question has been asked a lot in recent years, with a renewed emphasis on small farms, organic farming, and eating food from local sources. 

The players are frequently white.  Natasha Bowens knew the story was more complicated and diverse... her own family tree contains both farm slaves and farm owners. 

So she set out on a multimedia project to portray farmers of color, and that led up to a new book The Color of Food: Stories of Race, Resilience and Farming. 

Wikimedia

While legislatures in other states continue to work on bills restricting abortion, Oregon is getting out front on birth control. 

House and Senate have both passed a bill that would guarantee no out-of-pocket costs for women prescribed a year of birth control. 

Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon played a major role in passage of the bill. 

Robert Neff/Fifth World Art

Jackson County and the federal Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) are teaming up with an ambitious goal: housing all homeless vets by the end of the year.

Vets can have it rough: we hire them, train them, put guns in their hands, and send them off to war.  But once they're done in the military, veterans meet with mixed success finding places in society. 

A new program will pump money into efforts to get veterans into homes, with $6 Million coming to Jackson County through ACCESS, Inc

ACCESS is Jackson County's community action agency, the focus of several anti-poverty programs. 

Wikimedia

Our attitude toward veterans certainly has done an about-face in 40 years. 

Vets returning from the Vietnam war were met with disdain and outright hostility in many places. 

Now we often thank vets for their service to the country, a service most of us can scarcely understand. 

Southern Oregon veterans and their stories get time in the spotlight--and on camera--in a public TV series called "My Story of Service." 

Bill Leonhart

Brothers should keep in touch.  Bil and Jay Leonhart do, and they play music together, including a guitar/bass concert this weekend at Belle Fiore Winery near Ashland. 

Bil Leonhart will be featured guest on this month's First Friday. 

Music, theater, dance and more are celebrated on our First Friday Arts segment.  The Exchange syncs up with the art world on First Friday, by visiting with listeners about arts events in the coming month.

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