The Jefferson Exchange

News & Info: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook.

Or suggest a guest for The Exchange.

Alex Cox via Hannon Library

Whether it's on paper, on a big screen, or on a mobile device, we're often just looking for stories. 

Our parents read them to us as kids, and the habit sticks around.  Tod Davies is all about the story.  She's written some big ones, like the screenplay for the movie "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," and is the editorial director at Exterminating Angel Press.

Hannon Library at Southern Oregon University brings Davies in for a chat on "The Importance of Story," Thursday (May 12) at 4 PM. 

USDA/Public Domain

It's not quite like the mythical phoenix rising from the ashes, but we do create life from death. 

In our compost piles, that is.  Truly, we can enrich our gardens and yards through the decay of once-living matter. 

Rodney Bloom from the OSU Extension Service offers a program called "Decay for the Masses," with a session coming up Sunday in Eugene. 

Chronicle Books

Even people who do not consider themselves "birders" get excited when a bird flies by, displaying beautiful plumage. 

And the plumage is the point of Robert Clark's new book, called simply Feathers

Clark is a National Geographic photographer, and he turns his skills on bird exterior features in an astounding series of images. 

Wikimedia

We love to eat, that much is clear. 

One clear indicator: we love to talk about food.  And another chance to do just that is offered by the Oregon Humanities Conversation Project event called "We Are What We Eat: Connecting Food and Citizenship."

The chat will be offered for free at the Illinois Valley Branch of Josephine Community Libraries Friday (May 13th) at 5 PM. 

Penguin Random House

Information about Queen Elizabeth is abundant; she's reigned over England throughout the television age.

It's her long-ago predecessor, Elizabeth I, who remains something of a mystery. 

British historian John Guy dug into archives from more than 400 years ago to give us a better picture of the queen's later years in Elizabeth: The Forgotten Years. 

Allen Alley Campaign

You'd need a small bus to carry all the people running for Oregon Governor in the May 17th primary. 

John Kitzhaber's departure a month into his term put Kate Brown in office and triggered an unusual election for a two-year term in this election cycle. 

Former state Republican chair Allen Alley is one of a handful of GOP members running. 

His chief opponent, Bud Pierce, joined us previously. 

Alena Kravchenko/Wikimedia

We respect, if not revere, scientists and their work in our society.  We also do not entirely trust them.  How's that again?  Case in point: climate change... scientists demonstrate it, but some people reject it.

Oregon Humanities explores that situation and others in one of its Conversation Project programs, "In Science We Trust? The Role of Science in a Democracy." 

Gail Wells is the program leader, bringing it to Selma later this week (May 13th). 

Wikimedia

Somehow, one of the richest countries on Earth has difficulty feeding all of its people adequately.

So we have SNAP ("food stamps"), food banks, and many program providing food for people who have trouble affording it. 

Ashland is the site of the annual Empty Bowls fundraiser to bring in money for local program addressing hunger. 

Pam Marsh from the Ashland Emergency Food Bank and Maren Faye from Uncle Food's Diner visit to explain the impact of the fundraiser. 

HarperCollins

At the peak of Maya civilization, something like ten million people lived on the Yucutan Peninsula.  Fewer than a million live there now, near the ruins of Maya culture. 

We know of it now, but the whole story of the Maya people was lost for hundreds of years. 

Explorers found it again in the middle of the 19th century, a tale told in William Carlsen's book Jungle of Stone

Virginia Sherwood/NBC

Tom Brokaw was once called "The Kid," the youngest of the major TV network evening news anchors. 

His career may be behind him, but not his journalistic penchant for investigation.  When doctors diagnosed cancer three years ago, Brokaw set about learning more about multiple myeloma and its treatment. 

The resulting memoir is A Lucky Life Interrupted, now out in paperback. 

Geoff Ridden/Facebook

The first Friday of any month has become a day to celebrate the arts around our region. 

Several communities hold First Friday art walks, and some hold similar observances on other weekend days. 

The Exchange syncs up with the art world on First Friday, by visiting with listeners about arts events in the coming month.  Want to know what events are coming, or let people know?  Here's your chance.

Northwest Women Writers Symposium

Reyna Grande garnered critical acclaim and awards for her first two novels. 

Then she turned her focus on herself for a memoir about her illegal immigration to the United States as a child, The Distance Between Us.  She is now a U.S. citizen, beneficiary of an amnesty program.

The book will be re-released in an edition for younger readers this fall, long after her appearance this weekend at Northwest Women Writers Symposium events in Eugene. 

W.W. Norton Books

Does the cat actually judge you when you trip on your bathrobe belt?  We can't rule it out. 

Science knows a lot more about animal thinking these days, enough to know that we may not rank above animals so much as next to them--think evolutionary bush, not ladder. 

Biologist Frans de Waal studies primates and other creatures in his work, and he wrote the book Are We Smart Enough To Know How Smart Animals Are?  He provides many examples of animals using their brains well. 

Dean Rea/oregonhiking.com

There may be few hikers as dedicated as William L. Sullivan

Even better, few hikers who write as prolifically about hiking as Sullivan.  He's a fifth-generation Oregonian who loves to trek around the state on foot. 

And he's written 18 books and a pile of articles about the places he's seen, and is now revisiting previous hike sites to update his writing. 

State Department/Public Domain

It may not be a career for everyone, but working in the Foreign Service agrees with Lewis Lukens

He joined the State Department in the footsteps of his father, almost literally.  Lukens arrived in Senegal as U.S. Ambassador decades after his father worked in the embassy there. 

Lukens's job is now outreach and recruiting people interested in careers in the Foreign Service. 

Nobody currently alive was around at the time of the Big Bang, so far as we know.  So we go to science with the scientists we have. 

Fortunately, those include Caltech cosmologist and theoretical physicist Sean Carroll... he's got the science chops PLUS the Ted-talk friendly manner to communicate what he's learned. 

Which he puts on paper in a new book called The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself

lostcoastoutpost.com / Oliver Cory

Forty-four tons of trash, three shipping containers stuffed with people’s personal belongings, and close to 150 humans: all were removed from Palco Marsh in Eureka by the city's police this week. 

  Eleven former residents of the marsh are suing the city in federal court over the eviction. Attorney Shelley Mack is representing the group, known as the Palco 11. 

Wikimedia.com

Listeners take stage on our weekly VENTSday segment, a chance to vent on a couple of topics in the news--by phone, by email, or through our online survey. We provide the topics, you provide the opinions. 

  Topic 1: Voting by mail. If you're in Oregon, is there ANYTHING you miss about voting in polling-place elections on election day? If you're in California, is there any advantage to maintaining polling places for elections?

Topic 2: Do you support police action to evict homeless people from public places? 

juliezickefoose.com

"They grow up so fast," we always say of children.  Human children.  But our kids have nothing on the speed at which Baby Birds develop.  

  In her book by that name, artist and wildlife rehabilitator Julie Zickefoose tracks the progress of hatchlings born on her property, in words and paintings.  Eleven days from hatching to flying, in some cases.  

facebook.com

This year's race for Oregon Governor has attracted a crowded field of contenders from both sides of the aisle, but only one candidate is seeking a patent to go with his political platform. 

  Democrat David Stauffer of Portland describes himself as an "Environmental Innovations Inventor." 

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