The Jefferson Exchange

News & Info: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook.

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Up & Down Ashland

  Getting into the mountains can yield some spectacular views.  Getting into the mountains on a bicycle can get you the views and a lot of exercise. 

Such is the nature of the Oregon-designated Cascade Siskiyou Scenic Bikeway, rising into the mountains from the Rogue Valley floor. 

The inaugural event on the bikeway will be the Up & Down ride--advertised as "not a ride for the faint-hearted"--on July 23rd. 

Penguin Random House

  We live in a couple of states where lifelong residents can be few and far between. 

Sometimes it seems like everyone is from someplace else.  And it's not just here... Americans move a lot; for jobs, for college, for adventure. 

Melody Warnick had just finished move Number Six in her life when she decided to change her thinking about attachment to place.  The result is her book This Is Where You Belong

Ken Morrish/Wild Salmon Center

The fishing is world-class along the North Umpqua River. 

And it might be even better, if Congress acts to create the Frank Moore Wild Steelhead Sanctuary.  Moore was the longtime operator of the Steamboat Inn along the river, and a member of the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission. 

A bill to create the sanctuary in his name is working its way ever so slowly through Congress. 

Anthony Sanchelli/Air Force via Wikimedia

American military bases exist in countries around the world.  A few draw more attention--and more criticism--than others. 

Ramstein Air Base in Germany is one of them, because it is the home base for many drone operations in that part of the world. 

Journalist and war critic Norman Solomon writes about Ramstein and how it is used in a recent edition of The Nation

Penguin Random House

Apartheid ended in South Africa, but it did not end quietly.  Violence marked the drawing down of the strict separation of the races that had existed for decades. 

And the violence included the murder of a white American woman by a mob of young black men.  The parents of Amy Biehl forgave her killers.  But when writer Justine van der Leun investigated the case, the details only got more convoluted... leading to a wholesale reconsideration of crime and punishment, transgression and reconciliation. 

Her book We Are Not Such Things gets into the points of the murder and its much larger significance. 

Oregon State Parks

The history of our region is rich in detail, and a crowd of people will get their hands dirty this summer digging into it.  Quite literally.  

  The Geisel Homestead on the Southern Oregon Coast and other sites of hostilities between white settlers and native Americans are the focus of a summer archaeology project by the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology (SOULA).  

Mike Midlo / Kristyathens.com

"Vote with your dollars" is a common phrase, meaning support businesses you agree with by buying their products (and vote against other companies by NOT buying theirs).  

How well does that work in food products?  That is a question Kristy Athens considers in her work, which includes an Oregon Conversation Project event called "Good Food, Bad Food: Agriculture, Ethics and Personal Choice."  

Penguin Random House

It's a brave new world, one where new computers become aged and infirm in three years, or less.

  But what do the gadgets, games, or the military hardware of today tell us about tomorrow? Kevin Kelly says there are 12 trends in the recent explosion of new technologies, random and prolific as they may seem. 

Wellcome Images/Wikimedia

Lead hit the headlines in a big way with the news of lead in the Flint, Michigan water supply. 

And that led to many other communities wondering about the chance of finding lead in their water.  So a series of tests on water systems, facilities, and appliances has shown lead at actionable levels in schools and homes in Oregon, including recent findings of lead pipes in Medford. 

We begin to get a picture of lead in water, and why it's such a concern, with Jackson County Health Director Jim Shames, pediatrician Lauren Herbert at PeaceHealth in Eugene,  and Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center Director Richard Roseberg. 

Michael Richardson/Wikimedia

  It's time to get to know our lichens better. 

Naturalist Kem Luther can help in that department.  He's written a book about lichens, mosses, fungi, and the other things that grow on the forest floor in his book Boundary Layer from Oregon State University Press. 

Luther makes the comparison between the importance of plankton in the oceans and the importance of the plant layer in the forest. 

BLM

The image of wild horses on the open range is stirring. 

But beyond the image, there are some real issues for land managers. 

Because left alone, herds of wild horses and burros quickly multiply in number, beyond the ability of the federal Bureau of Land Management to see to their needs. 

So BLM proposes birth control for wild mares in Oregon, and plans to study the proposal with the help of Oregon State University this year.  But there's controversy attached to this and pretty much any plan for horse population control. 

Wikimedia

Long live wild horses.  That is the essence of the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign, which advocates for keeping horses alive and free and not facing slaughter in the American West. 

But horse populations grow relatively quickly, forcing federal managers to consider options to keep herd numbers down. 

AWHPC opposes slaughter and keeping horses captive, especially when removing animals from the range appears to favor private cattle herds. 

Southern Oregon University

  Aja Monet is probably pleased to know that she is difficult to categorize. 

She is a poet, songwriter, singer, activist, and much more.  And she arrives in Southern Oregon for the Youth Artists Institute in Ashland, at a time when issues she holds dear are very much in the news. 

Juvenile justice, police violence, and race relations continue to trouble the country, and they are of concern to her. 

HarperCollins

  Claire Hoffman had "made it" in life, doing work she liked, living with family in Los Angeles. 

But something felt empty about it all, and she realized she missed her unusual upbringing in the Midwest. 

She grew up in a meditation community where she learned spiritual practices and beliefs that stick with her to the present day.  It was also a community that grew more insular over time. 

Claire Hoffman tells the full story in her book Greetings From Utopia Park

City of Eugene

Maybe you've had one of those conversations while helping a friend prepare a meal: "do you compost?" 

Not everybody saves food scraps for composting.  And Eugene will soon start a trial run for the people who don't: curbside food waste pickup. 

1500 households will be included in the now business-only "Love Food Not Waste" program. 

Lulu Vision

Our VENTSday segment is meant to put anybody and everybody on the air with cogent comments about topics in the news.  But not everybody has easy access. 

So this week, in talking about appropriate laws, regulations, and supports for homeless, we hit the streets. 

Conversations with a handful of homeless people in Ashland are meant to spur further discussion from you, live at 800-838-3760 or JX@jeffnet.org

Our alternate topic this week--and our survey--follows our conversation about curbside food waste recycling: what do you need to recycle more? 

VENTSday is a once-a-week chance to vent on news topics. 

beingselfish.com

Sarah Marshank set out on a journey of self-discovery. 

And wow, what a journey... she's very candid about her transformation from nice Jewish girl to sex worker to celibate monk. 

It led to a philosophy she calls "selfistry," and she writes about it her memoir Being Selfish

Restore Oregon

Before the multiplex with the dozen-or-more smallish movies screens, we had big theaters downtown.

Medford's a great example: the historic Craterian got a major renovation 20 years ago, and the Holly is set for a major reworking. 

People like old theaters, especially when they are made to look new again.  Restore Oregon is holding a series of theater restoration workshops around the state. 

Randy McKay, boss of the Holly project, visits with details of the workshop and an update on his project. 

Pinterest

Ron Kovic's name is almost instantly recognizable to several generations of Americans. 

Tom Cruise played Kovic, a wounded Vietnam War veteran, in the Oscar-winning "Born on the Fourth of July." 

Kovic followed the book upon which the movie was based with a prequel just out called Hurricane Street

It tells the story of activism by Kovic and others to get better health care for all vets. 

University of California-Davis

You've probably got a list of animals you'd never think about hurting.  But what if those animals were crowding out other animals you valued? 

That is the ethical issue faced by the people manage the curbing or removal of invasive species. 

Like the Tui Chub, a fish in Diamond Lake that has crowded out sport fish in the past, leading wildlife managers to poison the lake to kill all the fish (and later re-stock). 

Joseph Tuminello studies this kind of ethical dilemma in his doctoral research in Texas. 

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