The Jefferson Exchange

News & Information: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook and Twitter.  Find the News & Information station list here.

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When cars drive themselves, will we all be backseat drivers?  There's something to think about. 

Jokes and philosophy aside, there are many issues yet to be resolved with self-driving cars. 

A simple one: how do they work?  A listener suggested this topic after our last session with mechanic Zach Edwards, the owner of Ashland Automotive

He joins us monthly for a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel. 

Invisibilia 1/4

Aug 11, 2017

Our emotions are plenty real to us when we're experiencing them, but are they universal? 

Do they come from inside us, or from society?  That's the question raised in Episode 1 of a new season of "Invisibilia." 

"Invisibilia" is Latin for "Invisible Things," and the series explores the unseen forces that shape human behavior. 

Wiki

In 1906, Teddy Roosevelt ordered a large fleet of US warships to circumnavigate the globe. The fleet, painted white as a symbol of peace, became known as The White Fleet. Author Leslie Compton recreates this legendary voyage as a historical love story using postcards sent by a White Fleet sailor. 

Leslie Compton joins us in the studio.

Picture of a drought affected landscape
CSIRO

It takes more than one wet year to recover from a severe drought. What if the next drought arrives soon after?

A new study published August 10 in Nature seeks to understand the ways in which ecosystems across the world recover from drought. It finds that, if a new drought arrives before the ecosystem has recovered from a previous drought, the entire ecosystem may change for good.

William Anderegg,  Assistant Professor of Biology at the University of Utah, is one of the study's authors and joins us to discuss his findings. It's far from a dry subject.

Random House

It happens to us all the time: one little slip on the keyboard, and a "protector" becomes a "protestor." 

Typographical errors are not fun for the committer, perhaps, but they can be highly entertaining for the rest of us. 

Scottish editor and author Drummond Moir proved the point with his book of some truly classical typing gaffes, called Just My Typo.

Public Domain/Wikimedia

We already have master gardeners and master recyclers in our midst. 

Now you can add a title: master climate protector.  It puts action into the concept of "think globally, act locally." 

Southern Oregon Climate Action Now, SOCAN, offers the 10-week training course for master climate protectors starting in September.  It follows a pilot program earlier in the year. 

News from around the world in an instant.  Summer movies.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

U.S. Army/Public Domain

The ground shook in Alaska in March 1964.  And shook and shook and shook. 

When the earthquake was over, it measured higher in magnitude than any other quake in North American history, more than 130 people were dead, and the resulting tsunami wiped out downtown Crescent City. 

Science journalist Henry Fountain pulls many details together for his book The Great Quake: How the Biggest Earthquake in North America Changed Our Understanding of the Planet.

NASA/Public Domain

One of the targets set by the Paris Climate Agreement is a limit to how much temperatures rise. 

The agreement aims to keep the increase under 1.5 degrees Celsius.  But that figure will likely be exceeded. 

In fact, a new study shows there's more than a 90% chance that the Earth will warm by more than 2 degrees during this century. 

Adrian Raftery at the University of Washington is the lead author. 

Wikimedia

Cellphones are in just about everybody's hands or pockets these days, and we've gotten used to having them around. 

We just notice less when people pull them out in restaurants and other public places.  But that doesn't mean we're all using them properly. 

In fact, cellphone users are often seen as rude by the people around them. 

If Emily Post were around, what we she say is good cellphone etiquette?  Let's ask her great-great-grandson. 

Daniel Post Senning writes about manners just like his famous ancestor. 

Wikimedia

It seems like a straightforward path: fix the environment, and the people will thrive. 

But the experience of Western organizations and individuals in Africa tells a different story.  Efforts to restore animals and ecosystems have often gone awry, with researchers noting local people getting sicker and hungrier while animal populations fail to thrive. 

This is the story told in White Man's Game: Saving Animals, Rebuilding Eden & Other Myths of Conservation in Africa

Author Stephanie Hanes lived in, and reported from< Africa several years. 

Azoreg, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5184943

Babies need a lot of touch and attention when they're growing up. 

Come to think of it, so do their mothers.  Linda Otto, who never had kids of her own, realized the need for something like unofficial grandmothers to help babies and their mothers thrive. 

Thus was born "Grandmas2Go," a service bringing support to high risk babies and their mothers and families in the Rogue Valley. 

Wikimedia

You've heard of POTUS and SCOTUS, now meet WOTUS. 

That acronym means Waters Of The United States, and the Obama Administration made a rule identifying even small and frequently dry bodies of water as subject to federal jurisdiction. 

Several states and groups objected, and President Trump ordered the WOTUS rule rescinded. 

The Oregon Farm Bureau supports the move, Trout Unlimited opposes. 

A public comment period is open until August 28th.  Place your comments here.

Bonnie U. Gruenberg, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19697422

Boy meets girl, girl and boy love each other, girl gets pregnant. 

Bam, the relationship ends, because boy does not want children.  It's a true-life story, lived by Heather Harpham. 

Her daughter was born with serious medical issues that required attention and dedication from both parents.  The story unfolds in Harpham's memoir Happiness: The Crooked Little Road to Semi-After Ever

Medford School District

Families moving from place to place for seasonal work can put a strain on their childrens' schooling. 

And the Medford School District addresses the issue with its Migrant Summer School program.  It allows students whose education has been disrupted to catch up on school work, especially their language skills. 

This summer's session serves a record number of students, around 320. 

Geoffrey Riley/JPR News

No need to tell you that the weather's been hot  -- too hot -- and it's creating all sorts of problems. 

Spending a few minutes in the high heat can be dangerous, and so can standing in the shade breathing, when there's wildfire smoke in the air

Bruce Hope, retired from Oregon DEQ, returns to the Exchange to talk about air quality and its effects on health, and Ryan Sandler from the National Weather Service explains how and why it's been so hot, and what we can expect in the coming weeks. 

Katie Alaimo / Roseburg News-Review

Oregon U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley is getting well known outside the state he represents. 

Merkley has been outspoken in his criticism and opposition to the Trump administration, including a true talking-marathon filibuster in opposition to the appointment of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court. 

Senators are heading back to their home states for a delayed August recess, and a chance to meet with constituents. 

Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest

Smoke has been a more regular feature of the region's skies of late. 

Up until the beginning of August, the fire season did not feature the huge outbreaks of fires of recent years.  But it may just be a matter of time. 

Whatever happens,  crews and equipment from Oregon Department of Forestry and other agencies are ready for lightning or human-caused fires, or whatever comes their way. 

Steve Sutfin/Camelot Theatre

Wow, it's August already?  And it's time once again to take stock of arts events coming to the region's stages and galleries in the week ahead. 

The Exchange gets in sync with the many First Friday art walks around the region by offering up our own First Friday Arts Talk. 

Simple recipe: six phone lines, 25 minutes or so, and all the calls we can fit in that time. 

Call 800-838-3760 to take part and talk up an arts event in your town. 

Sunriver Music Festival

The longstanding Britt Festivals in Jacksonville gobble up much of the attention, but there are other ongoing music festivals in our part of the world. 

The Sunriver Music Festival is starting its 40th season next week. 

George Hanson is the man with the baton, the music director of the festival. 

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