The Jefferson Exchange

News & Info: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and news makers from around the region and beyond. Participate at:  800-838-3760.  Email: JX@jeffnet.org.   Check us out on Facebook.  Find the News & Information station list here.

Or suggest a guest for The Exchange.

Oregon has been a hotbed of activity in the marijuana business since voters legalized pot in the November 2014 election. 

Which is why the Oregonian assigned reporters to cover the marijuana beat.  Noelle Crombie continues to break ground and break stories in her reporting for the paper and its web entity, Oregon Live. 

With retail sales now up and running and local taxes on sales, there's plenty to talk about. 

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Marijuana on the market means opportunities for users and sellers, and some for growers as well. 

And challenges for them, too... to grow a decent crop without spending too much money.  Some growers choose to grow marijuana indoors, and there are studies underway to make indoor grows of any crops more efficient. 

The University of California-Davis is home to the Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC), studying how best to balance environmental controls. 

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California had to learn and re-learn lessons about water conservation as drought deepened in recent years.  And the lessons will be needed again, because rain now does not mean the end of drought. 

Then there's the backdrop... a state that does not get much rain holds more people than any other state.  How can water use be curtailed, yet allow people and fish to thrive at the same time? 

That will be the central question when the Salmonid Restoration Federation convenes a workshop later this week in Fortuna (Jan. 13th).  We get a preview. 

NASA

Even if we all agree on environmental issues to address, how do we move forward? 

It helps to ask a few people, and that's exactly what Mark Lubell and his team at UC-Davis do. 

The Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior is big on surveys, figuring out why people take actions (or inactions) on environmental matters. 

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You have to admit, it took courage for our ancestors to get in rickety boats and travel across vast expanses of ocean to find lands new to them. 

It took luck, too... and ocean currents and a number of other factors. 

Archaeologist Scott Fitzpatrick at the University of Oregon studies the history of colonization in the Pacific and in the Caribbean.  And his studies take in weather patterns and other forces that may have forced choices on ancient explorers. 

Ashland Automotive

The recent onslaught of winter weather probably taught a few of us things we did not know about our cars. 

Like how well or poorly we got them ready for winter driving conditions. 

Zach Edwards knows cars and their care very well; that's why we invite him back on a regular basis for a car-talk segment we call "The Squeaky Wheel." 

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Bernie Madoff guaranteed his investment customers an eight percent return, every year. 

It sounded too good to be true, and it certainly was. 

Madoff's story is one of several in Maria Konnikova's book The Confidence Game, which points out how often people fall for cons, even after similar cons have been seen many times. 

There's a blend of psychology, theater, and persuasion at work, and the book works to pull apart the ingredients. 

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The Christmas decorations are coming down and the nights are still long and cold. 

All the more reason to get off the couch and burn off some holiday pounds enjoying some of the region's art happenings. 

Our First Friday Arts Segment returns for the first time in 2017, taking stock of events ranging from musical theater to gallery displays. 

And it is a listener-driven segment, composed entirely of phone calls from around the region plugging events in the coming weeks.  Those go to 800-838-3760. 

JPR News

Leslie Kendall has the kind of singing voice that makes people widen their eyes and ask "who's THAT?" 

We'll answer that question as we visit with Leslie, who recently retired from singing after a long career.  Her work includes singing with jazz and swing bands large and small, and cutting records for three different record companies. 

She's lived in Ashland for years now. 

Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4228375

It's been almost 52 years since The Beatles first appeared on the Ed Sullivan show, turning the flame of Beatlemania into a raging inferno. 

Penelope Rowlands remembers well... she not only got to see The Beatles back then, she was captured for all time in a photograph of girls hooting for their idols. 

Penelope grew up to become a writer, and the editor of The Beatles Are Here, a collection of stories about the Fab Four's time in the spotlight. 

Megathon Charlie/Flickr

Klamath County's violent crime rate for 2016 shot up in the final days of the year. 

Three separate homicides occurred in a span between December 26th and 31st; an unusual outbreak of violence. 

Stephen Floyd covered the cases for the Herald & News in Klamath Falls. 

Living outside is never easy, but it could be deadly this time of year.

A Portland man living on the street succumbed to hypothermia Monday, as temperatures plunged into the teens.

We hear about efforts in Lane County to keep people warm during dangerously cold times of year. Groups like St. Vincent De Paul are providing warming shelters from Dec. 1 to March 31 this year, longer than ever before thanks to a bump in state funding.

Ashland also provides cold-weather shelters.  Our guest is William Wise, Director First Place Family Center for St. Vincent De Paul Lane County. 

Gingkopress.com

Todd Blubaugh planned a motorcycle trip across the country, combining his twin passions for motorcycles and photography. 

His journey of self-discovery racheted up in importance when his parents died just days before his intended departure. 

Prose, personal letters, artifacts, and stunning photography combine to tell the story of the trip in Blubaugh's Too Far Gone.

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We'd be hard-pressed to find another person who is as passionate about music as Josh Gross. 

Or at least as passionate and ARTICULATE before 10 AM as Josh is. 

Josh is the music editor at the Rogue Valley Messenger (check out his Best of 2016 list), and a monthly contributor to The Exchange with "Rogue Sounds." 

JPR News

Rogue Valley communities are not used to dealing with snow in any amounts, and eight inches fell on Medford on Tuesday (January 3, 2017). 

That's a headache for travelers to deal with, and the job of road crews to clean up. 

The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) works closely with its California counterpart, CalTrans, on the Interstate Five corridor linking the two states. 

So California blizzard conditions led to a half-day shutdown on the Siskiyou Summit on the Oregon side, to allow road maintenance to catch up with the weather.

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It's been more than a decade since beekeepers began noticing huge die-offs of bees in their care, in a phenomenon called colony collapse disorder, or CCD. 

Science is perhaps closer to understanding the causes of CCD, but not to stopping it outright.  And the public at large has a stake, since bees pollinate so many of the crops we depend upon for food. 

Biologist Sainath Suryanarayanan and sociologist Daniel Lee Kleinman teamed up to explore bee plague and human reaction, in a book called Vanishing Bees

NASA/Public Domain

Recent history shows how trends in human behavior produce similar movements in different places far apart. 

Example: the UK vote on "Brexit" and the American presidential election.  But that's to be expected in a modern, connected world, right? 

So how do we explain some of the human revolutions of antiquity?  Michael Scott takes on that project in his book Ancient Worlds: A Global History of Antiquity, showing how societal changes happened even among humans scattered far and wide. 

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The State of Oregon will have to scramble for funding again in the coming legislative session. 

Revenue projections are not keeping up with the cost estimates, to no one's surprise.  Measure 97 in the November election was supposed to address the systemic issue by taxing corporations more.  But voters rejected it, leading to the obvious question: what next? 

A Better Oregon is already on it, floating an idea for a new corporate tax and a health care provider tax. 

By FluttershyIsMagic - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37476638

There tends to be a controversy attached to any official designation of a wilderness area. 

The argument against wilderness set-asides is that they restrict economic activity.  But the wilderness proponents point out that roads crisscross the planet, rendering most roadless areas small. 

There is now a global map of roadless areas showing exactly where the untouched islands lie. 

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Conservative giant William F. Buckley called his TV show "Firing Line" when it debuted in 1966. 

But despite the title, it was not a free-fire zone for people to yell at one another.  Debate and disagree, yes... but not like today's shouting matches on cable news channels. 

Buckley's show and his other work in media made him the prototype pundit, and that role allowed him to present his ideas to a broader audience.  Over time, they became mainstream. 

M.I.T. professor Heather Hendershot reconstructs the journey of conservatism from outcast to inner circle in her book Open to Debate

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