As It Was

Classics & News: Mon-Fri • 9:30am & 1pm | News & Information: Mon-Fri • 9:57am

Colorful vignettes dedicated to the regional history of Southern Oregon and Northern California. As It Was is an all volunteer effort -- produced by Raymond Scully and narrated by Shirley Patton in partnership with writers from the Southern Oregon Historical Society.

If you have a writing background and would like to submit an As It Was essay for consideration, email your written piece to mrkrt@ashlandhome.net.

A collection of As It Was essays is available in a high-quality paperback book at the JPR Online Store.  Each episode is also available below.

  Firemen blamed an electrical short circuit in the Western Battery and Separator Co. for sparking a major blaze in North Bend the evening of July 30, 1933.  Among businesses seriously damaged were the Kruse and Banks Shipyard, the Mountain States Power Company and Western Battery, where the fire started.  Flames engulfed the three buildings within 15 minutes. 

  Residents of Medford, Ore., had a new source of entertainment when the Robert L. Lippert Theaters Co. opened a drive-in theater in the summer of 1949. 

Retired wildlife biologist Bob Smith didn’t hesitate on Oct. 24, 1999, to bid $19,000 for a wild horse rounded up by the Bureau of Land Management.  At a time when others were advocating slaughtering thousands of feral horses, Smith’s winning auction bid was a shocker. 

In the mid-1800s, brothers Jesse and Charles Applegate and their families settled land claims near “Yoncalla,” an area named after an Indian tribe north of Roseburg, Ore. Today, a seven-acre parcel of their property is dedicated to conserving more than 3,000 varieties of apples.

News of Deaths

Sep 3, 2013

Following years of sailing, gold mining, and real estate ventures, Capt. John Nash retired in Medford, Ore.  He bought the Hotel Medford in 1894 at the southeast corner of Main and Front streets, enlarged it and changed the name to the Nash Hotel.

On May 1, 1915, Dorothy Conner and her brother-in-law, Dr. Howard Fisher, sailed on first class tickets on the British luxury liner, the RMS Lusitania. They were headed for World War I hospital work in Belgium. Dorothy wrote to her mother near Jacksonville, Ore., that it would be a very boring crossing, and she hoped something exciting might happen on their last day. It did.

David Douglas and the Douglas-Fir

Jul 1, 2005

Douglas-fir trees grow abundantly in Northern California and Southern Oregon. Its wood, one of the hardest softwoods, is a favorite framing timber, while appearance grade lumber makes handsome finish work. The tree is significant to the Northwest economy, but what of the man for whom the tree was named?

Pages