Here & Now

News & Information: Mon-Fri • 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

A fast-paced program that covers up-to-the-minute news and also provides regular features on food, technology, finance, culture and more.

It’s 1967 in Los Angeles in NBC’s new show “Aquarius.” The crime drama, set in an era of free love, cheap drugs and “unparalleled music,” sets up a promising plot, which viewers will be able to watch in one long binge on NBC’s website or mobile app starting on May 29, 2015.

It is NBC’s first “binge-watching” show, which was popularized by media companies like Hulu, HBO and Netflix.

In his free time, NPR correspondent Frank Langfitt likes to drive around Shanghai as a sort of free taxi cab, offering rides to strangers, to get to know the real lives of ordinary Chinese.

He sometimes records their stories, for his ongoing series Streets of Shanghai.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to Langfitt about what he’s been learning, and what it’s like driving in China.

In the final installment of our “Bay Days in History” conversations, author Michael Farquhar Here & Now’s Robin Young take us back to 1632.

On May 8, 1632, an English court called upon the unfortunate printers of a King James Bible, who let more than a few spelling and grammar errors slip through the cracks such as, “Thou shalt commit adultery.”

As the use of health and fitness mobile apps and wearable activity trackers grow, so do questions about what happens to the sensitive data these devices collect – all those steps, calories and heart rate readings the devices measure. Carolyn Beeler from Here & Now contributor WHYY’s “The Pulse” reports.

5 Dessert Recipes For Mother’s Day

May 8, 2015

Mother’s Day is Sunday, so Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst joined us with recipes that use fruits and even vegetables: a strawberry-rhubarb pie, a fresh-fruit Pavlova, carrot-parsnip cupcakes and even a strawberry-rhubarb drink for a festive Mother’s Day brunch.

These desserts aim to take advantage of the bounty of the spring season, without being too sweet.

Mike Barry of The Guardian joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to look at how the news is reverberating on social media. The stories include:

The NFL’s report on the controversy over whether the New England Patriots used deflated footballs during the AFC Championship game, dubbed “Deflategate.”

Let's Have Dinner And Talk About Death

May 6, 2015

The last time you went to a dinner party, you probably didn’t talk about death, but that’s the focus of conversation at a growing number of tables. It’s part of an international movement called “Death Over Dinner.” The goal is talk about important questions before it’s too late. In San Francisco, Lesley McClurg of Capital Public Radio joined a recent gathering of guests with ties to Silicon Valley.

For this week’s DJ Session, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson sits down with DJ Luis “Speedy” Gonzalez, who hosts “Latin Jazz and Salsa” on WMNF in Tampa, Florida. He shares new Latin and salsa sounds, including artist Tony Succar’s new tribute to Michael Jackson, and the Afro-Cuban funk group Palo.

Freightliner, a division of Daimler, has been given a license to test its self-driving tractor-trailer truck in Nevada. The trucks will have a driver in the driver’s seat to take control when the truck is in cities, but the idea is that on limited-access interstates it could self-drive. CNN’s Maggie Lake discusses the implications with Here & Now's Robin Young.

Guest

When David Letterman makes his last wisecrack as host of the “Late Show” on May 20th, he’ll be concluding an accomplished 33-year career that included more than 6,000 late-night broadcasts and almost 20,000 guest appearances.

His shows received 16 Emmy Awards awards and a staggering 112 Emmy Award nominations.

NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the host’s legacy and final weeks.

What Is Cinco De Mayo?

May 5, 2015

Today is Cinco de Mayo (the fifth of May), a Mexican holiday traditionally celebrated with colorful costumes, singing, dancing and lots of drinking.

The day is well known in U.S., but as we sip on margaritas, do we know exactly what we’re celebrating?

The holiday commemorates a Mexican victory over the French in Puebla on May 5, 1862.

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch is visiting Baltimore today to meet with local leaders, as things are slowly getting back to normal in the city.

The city has lifted its curfew, National Guard Troops are pulling out and businesses, including CVS, are saying they will rebuild.

But tensions are still running high in parts of the city, as evidenced yesterday after police arrested a black man. Rumors were running rampant that police had shot the man in the back as he was running away.

The United States says climate change will be front and center on the agenda of the Arctic Council – the intergovernmental body made up of eight countries with territories in the region.

The U.S. is now chair of the council, which includes Russia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden.

Founded in 1996, the council’s purpose is to promote cooperation in the region. They are not policymakers, but do advise governments on issues related to the Arctic.

Today is the 45th anniversary of the killing of four students by National Guard troops on the campus of Kent State University in Ohio during a rally to protest U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

The cultural divisions of those times have been examined in numerous books and documentaries, but sometimes history leaves its mark in other ways.

Comcast reported today that its total revenue rose 2.6 percent in the quarter that ended March 31, surpassing analyst expectations.

The earnings report comes after Comcast abandoned its plans to merge with Time Warner Cable, amid news of increased scrutiny from regulators over the deal.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson takes a look at Comcast’s earnings with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News.

David Wildstein, a former Port Authority official in New Jersey, pleaded guilty today to playing a role in shutting down lanes of traffic during rush hour on the George Washington Bridge, a move taken as political retribution against the Mayor of Fort Lee, New Jersey, who refused to support New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s bid for re-election.

Wildstein was a known Christie ally, as well as one of the governor’s childhood friends.

Lincoln History Told Through Tree Rings

May 1, 2015

In 1992, the Lincoln Vault Oak was cut down to protect Abraham Lincoln’s burial vault.

At the president’s funeral in 1865, the tree stood just a few feet from the event, shading the funeral choir.

When the tree was finally cut down, local arborist Guy Sternberg salvaged the massive stump and began a dissection project that peeled back the layers of history to reveal clues about that day.

Sternberg speaks with Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd about what he was able to learn.

 

The free music streaming service Grooveshark has closed down its service after a six-year legal battle with the music industry.

The closure of the service, owned by Escape Media, is part of a settlement with Universal Music Group, Sony Music and Warner Music Group, in which the company issued a formal apology in lieu of paying damages to the labels.

When people think of George Washington’s home, Mount Vernon, Va., usually comes to mind – but that’s just where he lived later in life. Our first president spent most of his childhood at Ferry Farm in Fredericksburg, Va.

The house itself has long since been destroyed, but after years of excavation, archaeologists have found its exact location, along with hundreds of thousands of artifacts. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Matthew Schwartz of WAMU went there to hear the tale.

When President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train left Indianapolis on May 1, 1865, it turned north to Chicago. But Here & Now’s series Tracking Lincoln is going due west to Decatur, Illinois.

Lincoln lived near Decatur long before he became president. It’s said that he made his first public speech right there in the center of town, where a statue of the young president-to-be now stands.

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