Here & Now

News & Information: Mon-Fri • 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

A fast-paced program that covers up-to-the-minute news and also provides regular features on food, technology, finance, culture and more.

The House has passed a sweeping tax cut bill, and the Senate is expected to vote on its own version next week.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson gets answers to commonly asked questions about the overhaul from Michael Regan (@Reganonymous) of Bloomberg News.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau director Richard Cordray announced Wednesday that he’ll be stepping down. The future of the financial watchdog agency is unclear in an administration that supports slashing regulations.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson discusses what’s next with NPR’s Chris Arnold (@Chris_ArnoldNPR).

NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik (@davidfolkenflik) and Here & Now‘s Robin Young discuss reports of impostors claiming to represent The Washington Post and The New York Times.

Organic food is a $40 billion industry and growing. That has the attention of some farmers discouraged by years of low prices for their conventional crops.

Harvest Public Media’s Grant Gerlock (@ggerlock) has the story of a Nebraska farm making the switch to tap into the lucrative organic market.

In his debut novel “The Hidden Light of Northern Fires,” Daren Wang tells the story of Mary, who uses her New York farm as an Underground Railroad stop for escaped slaves during the Civil War. It’s a risky venture because her town has seceded from the Union.

Authorities say at least four people have been killed in shootings at multiple locations in rural Northern California, and the shooter has been killed by law enforcement.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets the latest from NPR’s Nathan Rott (@NathanRott).

Over the weekend, Keurig tweeted it was pulling ads from Sean Hannity’s show after he made controversial comments about Roy Moore, the Republican U.S. Senate candidate in Alabama accused of sexual misconduct with teenage girls when he was in his 30s.

Keurig’s announcement led to the call for a boycott from conservatives, and the smashing of Keurig coffee machines. Keurig was one of a number of companies that pulled advertising from “Hannity.”

The media shapes public perception about current events, but that doesn’t mean we all see or hear the same things. A team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has developed a platform for “studying media ecosystems” that reveals how news events are framed by media outlets around the world.

Natural history collections serve as a time capsule of sorts, preserving life on Earth. And these collections — birds, bones, stones — always carry the fingerprints of those who collected the specimens. Their passions, interests and hard work become part of what’s stored in flash display cases or dusty drawers.

So when a collection’s future is threatened, it gets personal.

This week, United made its last flight on a Boeing 747 aircraft. Delta will be retiring the 747 by the end of the year, which means no North American passenger airlines will operate the “Queen of the Sky.”

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Clive Irving, aviation correspondent for The Daily Beast and author of the book “Wide-Body: The Triumph of the 747,” about the end of the 747 era.

A New Use For Polytrauma Treatment

Nov 10, 2017

Treating American service members wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has caused a new military emphasis on polytrauma, a medical term meaning more than one serious injury.

The lessons learned from treating those complex wounds demanded a new model of care that today is helping veterans and active-duty military heal — whether they have seen combat or not. Wendy Rigby (@TPRWendy) from Texas Public Radio has the story.

It’s truffle season, a time when many upscale restaurants incorporate white and black truffles into their dishes.

Regalis Foods founder Ian Purkayastha (@IanPurkayastha) has had a longtime love affair with truffles. He joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss his memoir “Truffle Boy: My Unexpected Journey Through the Exotic Food Underground.”

Top Senate Republicans are calling for Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore to step aside if allegations published Thursday by The Washington Post are true.

This year like any other, people are debating whether or not to get vaccinated for the flu. Researchers and manufacturers of the vaccine are trying to find a way to produce a more effective product.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young finds out about efforts to develop a better flu vaccine from Helen Branswell (@helenbranswell) of STAT.

When President Trump was asked about the shooting at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, that killed 26 and injured 20, he brought up the fact that a man nearby grabbed his rifle and ran to the church.

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As the world’s population continues to rise, farmers are looking for innovative ways to increase crop yields. Sometimes the methods are high-tech.

What's Going On In Saudi Arabia?

Nov 7, 2017

Saudi Arabia has accused Iran of “direct military aggression” for supplying Houthi rebels in Yemen with missiles. Iran and Saudi Arabia are vying for influence and power in the region, and they’re engaged in proxy wars in Yemen and other countries, now seeming to involve Lebanon.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Wilson Center analyst Aaron David Miller (@aarondmiller2).

The Latest From Sutherland Springs, Texas

Nov 6, 2017

Officials in Texas say half of the 26 people killed in Sunday’s church shooting in Sutherland Springs were children. We’re also learning more about the deceased shooter, Devin Kelley, and what happened after Kelley fled the First Baptist Church.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti gets an update from KUT’s David Brown.

This modern family consists of three parents: a married couple, Zeke Hausfather and Avary Kent, and their friend David Jay.

The three decided to come together in a committed — and legal — relationship and co-parent baby Octavia together. They tell Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about their decision and how it works.

Interview Highlights

On deciding to have a third parent

Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation says the Republican plan to cut corporate taxes to 20 percent from 35 percent will cost about $850 billion over the next decade.

How will the government make up for the lost revenue, and how will the middle class fare under the plan? Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with George Yin, professor of law and taxation at the University of Virginia who formerly served as the committee’s chief of staff.

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