Jessica Robinson

Inland Northwest Correspondent Jessica Robinson reports from the Northwest News Network's bureau in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. From the politics of wolves to racial tolerance in small towns, Jessica covers the economic, demographic and environmental trends that are shaping communities east of the Cascades.

Prior to joining the Northwest News Network team, Jessica was the news director of Jefferson Public Radio in Ashland, Oregon, where she produced a newsmagazine on Northern California and Southern Oregon. In 2010, she took a year to study Spanish in central Mexico and reported for an English–language newspaper in San Miguel de Allende. Jessica's stories for radio and print have earned awards from the Associated Press, the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association, and Public Radio News Directors Inc.

A Northwest native, Jessica grew up in an off–the–grid log cabin in the Columbia River Gorge. These days, when she's not agonizing over the perfect piece of tape, Jessica enjoys camping and hiking, amateur photography, and learning the etymology of words.

The search is on to find an alternative to salting the roads in winter. Salt helps melt the ice, but it also builds up in stream beds and drinking water.

Federal land managers are rescinding a permit that would have allowed a competition to hunt wolves and coyotes in Idaho.

Over the weekend, the story of a transgender woman in Idaho whose family had her buried as a man lit up social media.

The movie “Wild” hits select theaters Friday, December 5. It's based on a memoir by a Portland author who made a life-changing trek on the Pacific Crest Trail.

A new study out of Canada reveals a surprising side-effect that hunting may have on wolves.

A slowdown at West Coast ports is beginning to stifle the flow of goods in and out of the Northwest.

A slowdown in operations at ports up and down the West Coast is choking off the flow of apples, Christmas trees, potatoes and other Northwest products to foreign markets.

The Native American Music Awards recognize indigenous musicians from the U.S., Canada and Latin America. It is considered to be the Grammys of Native American music.

New statistics out Monday from the FBI show violent crime continues to decrease in Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

The Environmental Protection Agency is testing out a new technique for keeping heavily-used river banks from eroding into the water.

HBO is planning a new six-hour miniseries on the Lewis and Clark expedition.

The city of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, said a for-profit wedding chapel owned by two ministers doesn't have to perform same-sex marriages.

A little-known fact about Columbia River dams is that a valuable chunk of the power generated on the U.S. side goes to Canada under an international treaty.

Religious conservatives around the country are rallying to the defense of a wedding chapel in north Idaho whose owners don’t want to perform gay marriages.

County clerks in Idaho officially began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples today. But those couples aren’t the only ones celebrating.

The Idaho attorney general has asked his legal staff to start looking at what implications gay marriage will have for the state.

Same-sex couples in Idaho are awaiting one more court decision Monday on the state's on-again, off-again gay marriage ban.

A group in the Boise area is in the midst of fundraising for a new attraction in the Northwest. It'll be called the Northwest Science Museum.

Coeur d’Alene's North Idaho College received a major grant Monday to train people in rural areas for hard-to-fill jobs in the health care industry.

Under fire from free speech advocates and nature enthusiasts, the U.S. Forest Service, said Thursday it has absolutely no intention of charging people to take pictures on public land.

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