Geoffrey Riley

News Director | Jefferson Exchange Host

Geoffrey Riley began practicing journalism in the State of Jefferson nearly three decades ago, as a reporter and anchor for a Medford TV station. It was about the same time that he began listening to Jefferson Public Radio, and thought he might one day work there. He was right.

Geoff came to JPR as a backup host on The Jefferson Exchange in late 2000, and he assumed the full-time host job at the beginning of 2010. The two hours of the Exchange allow him to join our listeners in exploring issues both large and small, local and global. In addition to hosting The Exchange, Geoff oversees JPR’s news department as its News Director.

Geoff is a New York native, with stints in broadcast news in Missouri, Alabama, and Wisconsin before his arrival in Oregon. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

Plumbing The Depths Of Seafood

Feb 3, 2017
Public Domain/Wikimedia

The ocean's mysteries are largely uncharted. We do know many of its creatures are delicious.

Yet the unknowns can multiply (or bioaccumulate), when something edible makes the trip from sea to plate.

Jennifer Burns Bright is a food writer who explores these issues, and our collective taste for the deep and briny.

She's based in Port Orford and the leader of an Oregon Humanities Conversation project about the traditions and challenges of seafood in Oregon.

Taking Care Of "The Squeaky Wheel"

Feb 3, 2017
Ashland Automotive

What ails your car?  Zach Edwards can't fix a car over the phone, but he can certainly try to diagnose the problem. 

This month we focus on how to decide if you should sell or fix an ailing car.

Zach is the proprietor of Ashland Automotive, and our monthly visitor for a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel.

Exploring WHY Neonicotinoids Are Harmful

Feb 3, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Reading a pesticide label is a bit like plunging headlong into a foreign language, one with a fast-changing vocabulary. For example: neonicotinoids.

They're a relatively new class of pesticides, favored now because they cause less toxicity in birds and mammals than insects. But that's not good news for pollinators.

Two pesticide experts join us to translate what neonic pesticides mean for the insects who actually help plants grow.  Aimée Code is Pesticide Program Director for The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. Dr. Susan Kegley heads up the Pesticide Research Institute.

Percussion Groups Plan Ashland "Resist"ance

Feb 3, 2017
JPR News

Since the November election, some of our friends and neighbors speak in terms of "resistance." 

There's a similar message in the musical program "Resist," but the work pre-dates the election. 

Southern Oregon percussion duo Caballito Negro, previous guests of The Exchange, join forces with Left Edge Percussion for a concert that features flutes, "a truckload of percussion," spoken word, film, and images. 

The concert is Thursday, February 9th. 

Cephas, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27124271

The First Friday in February has arrived, and with it, a look ahead to a passel of performances and exhibitions in the arts. 

We call it our First Friday Arts segment, a call-driven segment where YOU are the guest. 

If you have an event on stage or gallery or screen to report, tell the rest of the audience, at 800-838-3760. 

You'll be talking to listeners from Mendocino to Eugene. 

"Mostly Mercer" From Siskiyou Music Project

Feb 2, 2017
Siskiyou Music Project

Complete this sentence: "Moon River, wider _____________."  If you said "than a mile," you're familiar with the music of Johnny Mercer. 

His songs form the heart of a program coming to the stage on February 18th, with vocals by Chris Williams and guitar by Ed Dunsavage. 

It is the kickoff to an entire season of performances from the Siskiyou Music Project

Exchange Exemplar: "Texts From Jane Eyre"

Feb 2, 2017
Wikimedia/JPArt

Think of some of the great lines in literature, like "frankly my dear, I don't give a damn."

Now try to imagine those lines delivered by text message.  Would they be the same? 

In the hands of Mallory Ortberg, they are hilarious.  She wrote a book a few years back called Texts from Jane Eyre, with imaginary electronic messages back and forth between some of the major characters in literature. 

DAVID ILIFF. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0

In an age of "libtards" and "cuckservatives," is there any reason to believe we can conduct our discussions of government more with more civility?  The Institute for Civility in Government thinks so. 

The institute's name is its mission, a tall order in a time when opposite sides of an argument don't even agree on the facts. 

The Rev. Cassandra Dahnke is the co-founder of the institute. 

The Plan To Bring Condors To The Redwoods

Feb 1, 2017
U.S. Fish & Wildlife

At one time, the number of California condors could be counted on the hands of just three people. 

The bird--largest land bird in North America--was that close to extinction.  Now it numbers in the hundreds, both in captivity and in the wild. 

And plans to reintroduce condors to their historic habitat continue, most notably with a plan to bring the birds to Redwood National Park. 

It's a joint project of many partners, including US Fish & Wildife, the National Park Service, and the Yurok tribe. 

The Rise And Fall Of Glam Rock

Feb 1, 2017
Hunter Desportes, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12800857

The British Invasion in popular music gave way to more free-form sounds as the 1960s went on. 

And that phase gave way to "glam rock" and David Bowie and Lou Reed and the New York Dolls. 

Could a fan of Led Zeppelin like Queen at the same time?  Simon Reynolds ponders these issues in his book on the genre, Shock and Awe: Glam Rock and Its Legacy, from the Seventies to the Twenty-first Century

Wikimedia

Josh Gross has an addiction, and it's one we're only too happy to share. 

He loves music, and across a wide spectrum of genres and styles. 

Josh makes music, and writes about music for the Rogue Messenger.  And once a month, he visits the studio with "Rogue Sounds," a compilation of musical samples and news of coming band dates. 

The Long Arm Of The SCOTUS

Jan 31, 2017
Wikimedia

The announcement of a choice for Supreme Court justice is always a big deal.  

President Trump made it that much bigger by making the announcement in prime TV time.  

The decisions of the Supreme Court (SCOTUS) may not be actually set in stone, but they can certainly affect American law for generations.  

University of Oregon political scientist Alison Gash focuses on courts and rights in her work.  

Bracing For Immigration Action

Jan 31, 2017
Wikimedia

Two words from the presidential campaign linger into the early days of the Trump administration: "the wall." 

The president continues to talk of strengthening security on the border with Mexico, and addresses it directly in an executive order from January 25th.  

That order also includes wording about rounding up people who have already entered the United States illegally.  

People like Ricardo Lujan, a Southern Oregon University student who was brought into the U.S. at age 9.  

Ashland Composer Composes Life Story

Jan 31, 2017
Wikimedia

"Composer" usually implies music, and Ashland resident Webster Young has written plenty of that. 

But he also writes books about his life as a composer, including a new one called The Luxuries of Unharried Time

It is a continuation of his memoirs about life in the music business, including his dismissal from music school.  We can't wait to hear that story. 

What Happens When Art And Politics Collide?

Jan 25, 2017
Kellyworman.com

Art reflects the times of the artist.

What will contemporary artists have to say about the age of Trump? Artist Richard Prince recently denounced his portrait of Ivanka Trump, in a case of satire doubling down on itself, or perhaps, meeting with sincerity.

We talk with artist Kelly Worman about what to make of that: art, politics and how the lines blur. Worman is a guest curator at Southern Oregon University's Schneider Museum of Art.

BLM

Thank goodness for the dry environment in the vicinity of Paisley, Oregon. 

The conditions have helped preserve evidence of possible human habitation thousands of years ago... long before the usual theories about the first humans in North America. 

Dennis Jenkins at the University of Oregon has supervised many digs at the Paisley Caves, and now he reports on the finding of very old horse bones found there.  Dr. Jenkins shares the microphone in this month's edition of "Underground History." 

What Moves The Ground Beneath Us

Jan 24, 2017
Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup

Check out the web page of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and click on the markers for recent earthquakes.

You'll be surprised to see that they happen all the time... it's just that few of them are strong enough for us to feel. 

The Cascadia Subduction Zone in which we live poses a constant threat of big earthquakes, and other features can also contribute to powerful Earth movements. 

Seismic Network president John Vidale lectures this week at Southwestern Oregon Community College on temblors in the Northwest. 

Two Cents Day: Presidents And Protests

Jan 24, 2017
Public Domain/Wikimedia

Our once-in-a-while opinion round robin gets a new name for the new year: TWO CENTS DAY. 

It's a nod to a more positive kind of discussion, not just the stream of heated consciousness implied by the old name, VENTSday. 

The first time out of the gate, we invite you to join some of the people in last weekend's womens' marches.  We asked several of them why they attended, and what their signs said. 

Whether you did, did not, or would not march, give us your two cents at 800-838-3760 or JX@jeffnet.org

Matt Taibbi Pulls No Punches On President

Jan 24, 2017
White House Photo Office/Wikimedia

Journalist Matt Taibbi won't win any friends at the White House with the title of his latest book: Insane Clown President

But then Taibbi, a Rolling Stone contributor, is not known for his diplomacy, just a call-it-like-I-see-it attitude in his writing. 

He rewinds the tape of the 2016 election campaign in all its grace and glory, examining the moves, countermoves, and just plain dumb luck that resulted in the November outcome. 

Key Streams Get Mining Protection

Jan 23, 2017
PGHolbrook/Wikimedia Commons

A flurry of federal environmental protections took place in the waning days of the Obama administration. 

In addition to the much-publicized expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, 100,000 acres of headwaters of the Smith River and other streams were withdrawn from possible mining by an action of the Interior Department. 

It is not a permanent block, though it would likely be a long time before mining interests were able to work their claims. 

The Kalmiopsis Audubon Society is one of several groups that pushed for the mineral withdrawal. 

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