Geoffrey Riley

News Director | Jefferson Exchange Host

Geoffrey Riley began practicing journalism in the State of Jefferson nearly three decades ago, as a reporter and anchor for a Medford TV station. It was about the same time that he began listening to Jefferson Public Radio, and thought he might one day work there. He was right.

Geoff came to JPR as a backup host on The Jefferson Exchange in late 2000, and he assumed the full-time host job at the beginning of 2010. The two hours of the Exchange allow him to join our listeners in exploring issues both large and small, local and global. In addition to hosting The Exchange, Geoff oversees JPR’s news department as its News Director.

Geoff is a New York native, with stints in broadcast news in Missouri, Alabama, and Wisconsin before his arrival in Oregon. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

See Source - A Surprising New Path to Tumor Development. PLoS Biol 3/12/2005: e433 doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0030433, CC BY 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1431947

The terms "cure" and "cancer" generally do not appear in the same sentence, except to describe what we all hope for the future. 

Yet Glenn Sabin swears his health regimen allowed him to recover from leukemia.  And he's gotten the attention and support of medical professionals, including Rogue Valley oncologist Dawn Lemanne

She helped Sabin write a book describing his medical odyssey, "n of 1".  The name refers to the number of patients in a medical study... and in Sabin's case, he's the ONE who took part in his therapies. 

Mambazo.com

Much of the world first learned of the South African a cappella group Ladysmith Black Mambazo when they performed with Paul Simon in the 1980s. 

But Mambazo had already been around for a couple of decades by then, and the group continues to sing and tour and impress. 

It's been more than five decades now, and two of the members from the 1960s are still in the group.  Albert Mazibuko joined in 1969, and he'll be with Mambazo for a stop in Eugene at the end of January (WOW Hall, January 27th). 

Complete Coach Works

Public transportation already gets credit for reducing emissions by getting people out of their cars. 

Just imagine how much more emissions are reduced by an electric bus. 

Eugene's Lane Transit already committed to buying electric busses; now Rogue Valley agencies are getting to kick the tires, with endorsement from groups like Southern Oregon Climate Action Now and the Southern Oregon Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Association (SOHEVA)

An electric bus from Complete Coach Works spent the week working in Ashland, Medford, and Grants Pass. 

Library of Congress/Wikimedia

The third week of January will be a very big week. 

It begins with the Martin Luther King, Jr. birthday observance and ends with the inauguration of Donald J. Trump as U.S. President. 

We'll focus on MLK first, as several cities plan ceremonies.  One of the biggest every year is in Ashland, produced by Claudia Alick at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. 

H. Andrew Schwartz, Johannes C. Eichstaedt, Margaret L. Kern, Lukasz Dziurzynski, Stephanie M. Ramones, Megha Agrawal, Achal Shah, Michal Kosinski, David Stillwell, Martin E. P. Seligman, Lyle H. Ungar - http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1

Any relationship with another human being is bound to have a few sensitive areas, subject matters that are trod upon lightly.

And the choices we make in HOW to talk about them can make all the difference. 

Relationship expert and therapist Carl Alasko points out just how critical word choices are in his book Say This, Not That

That title should tell you plenty. 

John R. McMillan/NOAA Fisheries

It's a good time to be a fish on the North Coast.  Or at least a good time to be a person who wants fish to thrive on the North Coast. 

The Martin Slough project is on the verge of receiving funding to reduce flooding and enhance fish habitat along the slough that winds through the south end of Eureka. 

The project involves the Redwood Community Action Agency, NOAA Fisheries, the federal agency, and the state Coastal Conservancy

Wikimedia

Addictions to opioid prescription drugs are all too common in America.  But facilities to treat people who've become addicted can be harder to find. 

Grants Pass is an example: until this week, Josephine County residents seeking treatment had to seek it in Jackson County, a half-hour drive or more. 

Grace Roots, an organization dedicated to confronting the addiction problem, opened the doors to a Grants Pass treatment center this week, and patients streamed in. 

And the official opening is not until today (Jan. 12). 

Dorothea Lange/National Archives

The shipping of Japanese-Americans to prison camps during World War II is not one of the prouder episodes in American history.  But it is a well-documented episode.

Some of the best-known American photographers of the time, including Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams, captured images of American citizens held captive in the name of security. 

A new collection of the photographs is offered in the book Un-American.  Photo historians Richard Cahan and Michael Williams assembled the collection. 

Amelia Templeton/EarthFix

Nobody figured that removing dams from the Klamath River would be easy. 

But the original plan to remove the J.C. Boyle Dam in Oregon and the Copco 1, Copco 2, and Irongate Dams in California was to have them out by 2020.  Which is getting close. 

Dam removal might start by that year; Pacific Power has already transferred its ownership to another entity, the Klamath River Renewal Corporation.

The California State Water Board begins environmental impact report meetings later this week in Arcata (Thursday, Jan. 12).  A meeting scheduled for Yreka on Tuesday was postponed by weather.

Where do things stand?  That's a question asked by the Yurok Tribe, one of the supporters of dam removal. 

Public Domain

The soil in the old Ashland railroad yard has been contaminated for so long, some of it came from steam locomotives. 

The site of the old roundhouse is where oil and other contaminants spilled and leaked on the ground. 

Now the property owner, Union Pacific, is about to clean it up.  But not before a few tweaks to the cleanup plan... for one thing, the bad soil will be taken out by rail, not by trucks on local streets. 

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality is overseeing the cleanup plan. 

Public Domain/Google Art

It's a simple thing, really, saying "I'm sorry, I messed up."  Well maybe the words are simple, but the process stumps a lot of us. 

In fact, it's not uncommon for people to botch an apology so badly that the hurt feelings are deepened. 

Therapist and relationship expert Harriet Lerner explores the difficulty inherent in apologizing in her book  Why Won't You Apologize? Healing Big Betrayals and Everyday Hurts

Oregon has been a hotbed of activity in the marijuana business since voters legalized pot in the November 2014 election. 

Which is why the Oregonian assigned reporters to cover the marijuana beat.  Noelle Crombie continues to break ground and break stories in her reporting for the paper and its web entity, Oregon Live. 

With retail sales now up and running and local taxes on sales, there's plenty to talk about. 

Wikimedia

Marijuana on the market means opportunities for users and sellers, and some for growers as well. 

And challenges for them, too... to grow a decent crop without spending too much money.  Some growers choose to grow marijuana indoors, and there are studies underway to make indoor grows of any crops more efficient. 

The University of California-Davis is home to the Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC), studying how best to balance environmental controls. 

Wikimedia

California had to learn and re-learn lessons about water conservation as drought deepened in recent years.  And the lessons will be needed again, because rain now does not mean the end of drought. 

Then there's the backdrop... a state that does not get much rain holds more people than any other state.  How can water use be curtailed, yet allow people and fish to thrive at the same time? 

That will be the central question when the Salmonid Restoration Federation convenes a workshop later this week in Fortuna (Jan. 13th).  We get a preview. 

NASA

Even if we all agree on environmental issues to address, how do we move forward? 

It helps to ask a few people, and that's exactly what Mark Lubell and his team at UC-Davis do. 

The Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior is big on surveys, figuring out why people take actions (or inactions) on environmental matters. 

Francis Sinclair/Public Domain

You have to admit, it took courage for our ancestors to get in rickety boats and travel across vast expanses of ocean to find lands new to them. 

It took luck, too... and ocean currents and a number of other factors. 

Archaeologist Scott Fitzpatrick at the University of Oregon studies the history of colonization in the Pacific and in the Caribbean.  And his studies take in weather patterns and other forces that may have forced choices on ancient explorers. 

Ashland Automotive

The recent onslaught of winter weather probably taught a few of us things we did not know about our cars. 

Like how well or poorly we got them ready for winter driving conditions. 

Zach Edwards knows cars and their care very well; that's why we invite him back on a regular basis for a car-talk segment we call "The Squeaky Wheel." 

Lucas/Wikimedia

Bernie Madoff guaranteed his investment customers an eight percent return, every year. 

It sounded too good to be true, and it certainly was. 

Madoff's story is one of several in Maria Konnikova's book The Confidence Game, which points out how often people fall for cons, even after similar cons have been seen many times. 

There's a blend of psychology, theater, and persuasion at work, and the book works to pull apart the ingredients. 

The following schools have reported closures or delays for:

Tuesday | January 10, 2017:

Schools Closed:

  • Prospect Charter School
  • Shady Cove School
  • Gilchrist Schools

Schools Opening Late:

  • Ashland School District-2 hour delay
  • Chiloquin Schools-2 hour delay
  • Klamath County School District - 1 hour delay

Bus Route Changes:

Benjamin Esham/Wikimedia

The Christmas decorations are coming down and the nights are still long and cold. 

All the more reason to get off the couch and burn off some holiday pounds enjoying some of the region's art happenings. 

Our First Friday Arts Segment returns for the first time in 2017, taking stock of events ranging from musical theater to gallery displays. 

And it is a listener-driven segment, composed entirely of phone calls from around the region plugging events in the coming weeks.  Those go to 800-838-3760. 

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