Geoffrey Riley

News Director | Jefferson Exchange Host

Geoffrey Riley began practicing journalism in the State of Jefferson nearly three decades ago, as a reporter and anchor for a Medford TV station. It was about the same time that he began listening to Jefferson Public Radio, and thought he might one day work there. He was right.

Geoff came to JPR as a backup host on The Jefferson Exchange in late 2000, and he assumed the full-time host job at the beginning of 2010. The two hours of the Exchange allow him to join our listeners in exploring issues both large and small, local and global. In addition to hosting The Exchange, Geoff oversees JPR’s news department as its News Director.

Geoff is a New York native, with stints in broadcast news in Missouri, Alabama, and Wisconsin before his arrival in Oregon. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

Tsunamis are not unknown on the West Coast.  In fact, plenty of people alive today can remember them. 

Like Tom Horning, who nearly lost his life in the 1964 tsunami and decided to return to live in Seaside, Oregon... which could well see another unwelcome visit from the ocean. 

Bonnie Henderson writes about Tom Horning and the potential for disaster in The Next Tsunami, from Oregon State University Press. 

Siskiyou Crest Blog

There's just a bit more than a week (August 1) to comment on the Environmental Assessment for the Nedsbar Forest Management Project on BLM land in the Applegate Valley. 

The alternatives for the project include one provided by the community. 

We heard from BLM and the community alternative assemblers in a previous edition.  Here we get the timber industry perspective from the American Forest Resource Council

Wikimedia

California votes on marijuana for personal use in November, but at the moment, only medical marijuana is legal. 

Just how good is the quality control on the medical pot?  That is the central question in the new "Track and Trace" program. 

Officially the Humboldt Cannabis Pilot Program, it will track and trace marijuana from grower to end user, starting August 1st and running into the autumn. 

Penguin Random House

Paul Graham loves his wheat, but his body does NOT. 

Graham, a lover of artisan bread and homemade beer, had to give those items up when he developed celiac disease. 

Switching to a gluten-free diet was no small feat, but he's done it. 

He shares the story of discovering his affliction in In Memory Of Bread

randompeopletheatre.org

There may be nothing that excites a performer more than performing on a new stage. 

So excitement is likely rampant at Random People Theater Project in Humboldt County. 

The group, composed of amateurs and old pros, performed for years at the Mateel Center in Redway, but just moved to a new home in Garberville. 

It's not just theater IN the community, it is theater ABOUT the community... Random People encourages stories from the region, written by local people about local people.

truenorthorganizing.org

People seeking justice--economic, social, environmental--have a place on the compass on the North Coast of California. 

True North Organizing Network brings together people who feel marginalized in Humboldt and Del Norte Counties. 

Tribal members, immigrants and more have allies in True North. 

Jacob Frank, National Park Service

Blast from the Past: Summer nights are excellent for viewing the night sky. 

Especially in August, when the Perseid meteor shower puts on something like a natural fireworks show. 

But in much of the world, lights from the ground tend to obscure our view of the lights from the sky.  Paul Bogard wrote about this in his book The End Of Night

staytruetoyou.org

One of the major concerns about marijuana becoming legal for personal use in Oregon was the possibility of younger people getting a hold of the drug.

Opponents of legalization pointed to "edibles," food items laced with marijuana, as a major concern.  Now marijuana AND the edibles are legal in Oregon, and the state Health Authority is launching a campaign to discourage pot use among adolescents. 

The "Stay True to You" campaign targets 12-to-20-year-olds. 

Wikimedia

Being a teenager is tough enough without having to worry about having a roof over your head. 

But plenty of teens have that worry; enough in the Eugene area to prompt the creation of a shelter for homeless high school students. 

The Saint Vincent De Paul Society of Lane County bought a vacant church in South Eugene with the intention of housing more than a dozen homeless students. 

If all goes as planned, it could open in the fall of 2017. 

mdvaden/Wikimedia

Trees grow slowly, and it sometimes appears as if forest management plans take a similar amount of time to take shape. 

So it is with the Nedsbar Forest Management Project in the Applegate Valley, a responsibility of the Medford office of the Bureau of Land Management

BLM says the tree stands are overstocked and in need of thinning.  Environmental groups say the plans would remove healthy, fire-resistant trees. 

We hear two sides of the project, beginning with BLM rep Kristi Mastrofini talking about the attributes of the sale. 

Then Luke Ruediger checks in with the alternative proposed by the Applegate Neighborhood Network and the Klamath Forest Alliance. 

Public Domain/Wikimedia

If the Earth's problem is too much carbon in the atmosphere and trees soak up carbon, will more trees head off climate change?  Maybe not, according to recently published research

Noah Charney at the University of Arizona and his team find trees all over North America stressed by higher-than-normal temperatures, and stressed trees grow more slowly. 

ACLU of Washington

The lack of sheriff's deputies in Josephine County creates issues for emergency workers who are NOT officers of the law.  Because the situations that lead to medical and fire calls are often police situations as well. 

And with no police around, emergency crews can find themselves in danger.  That's why the chief at the Wolf Creek Rural Fire Protection District wants body cameras on his firefighters... to keep a record of potential problems, if not help prevent them. 

Steve Scruggs is getting some help from BodyCameraDonations.com

Shay Sowden/Wikimedia

Scarcely a day goes by without some horrific act of violence--with multiple deaths--making the news.  Your reaction to that violence is our key topic on VENTSday this week. 

For an alternative, tell our audience your feelings about the proposal to removal federal protections for gray wolves. 

VENTSday removes the guests and puts listener comments front and center on The Exchange. Once a week, it's all about you... we plop a pair of topics on the table, post a survey on our Facebook page, and open the phone lines and email box for live comments.

The topics can range from presidential politics to how you spend your days off. Got an observation or opinion? Share it with the State of Jefferson on VENTSday.

Simon & Schuster

It's county fair season around the region.  Along with the cows, sheep, and 4-H kids come the carnivals, rides, and games of chance. 

They've cleaned up a lot over the years, but traveling carnivals used to be a great place to lose money. 

Eugene's Peter Fenton knows firsthand... he learned the tricks of the trade years ago; learned how to con people at the carnival.  He tells about it in his book Eyeing The Flash

Wikimedia

  The image conjured by the word "veteran" changes over time, because veterans themselves are changing. 

More women are serving in the armed forces, and once out, they are eligible for the same health services as men.  A major question is: do they use those services? 

The Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs wants an answer to that question, and invites women vets to take a survey on their use of health services. 

Up & Down Ashland

  Getting into the mountains can yield some spectacular views.  Getting into the mountains on a bicycle can get you the views and a lot of exercise. 

Such is the nature of the Oregon-designated Cascade Siskiyou Scenic Bikeway, rising into the mountains from the Rogue Valley floor. 

The inaugural event on the bikeway will be the Up & Down ride--advertised as "not a ride for the faint-hearted"--on July 23rd. 

Penguin Random House

  We live in a couple of states where lifelong residents can be few and far between. 

Sometimes it seems like everyone is from someplace else.  And it's not just here... Americans move a lot; for jobs, for college, for adventure. 

Melody Warnick had just finished move Number Six in her life when she decided to change her thinking about attachment to place.  The result is her book This Is Where You Belong

Ken Morrish/Wild Salmon Center

The fishing is world-class along the North Umpqua River. 

And it might be even better, if Congress acts to create the Frank Moore Wild Steelhead Sanctuary.  Moore was the longtime operator of the Steamboat Inn along the river, and a member of the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission. 

A bill to create the sanctuary in his name is working its way ever so slowly through Congress. 

Anthony Sanchelli/Air Force via Wikimedia

American military bases exist in countries around the world.  A few draw more attention--and more criticism--than others. 

Ramstein Air Base in Germany is one of them, because it is the home base for many drone operations in that part of the world. 

Journalist and war critic Norman Solomon writes about Ramstein and how it is used in a recent edition of The Nation

Penguin Random House

Apartheid ended in South Africa, but it did not end quietly.  Violence marked the drawing down of the strict separation of the races that had existed for decades. 

And the violence included the murder of a white American woman by a mob of young black men.  The parents of Amy Biehl forgave her killers.  But when writer Justine van der Leun investigated the case, the details only got more convoluted... leading to a wholesale reconsideration of crime and punishment, transgression and reconciliation. 

Her book We Are Not Such Things gets into the points of the murder and its much larger significance. 

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